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Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and More)

Last Updated on June 16, 2023

Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and More)

We've compiled a list of 100+  golf terms  that are useful to know, but the  golf scoring terms  we'll cover in this guide are among the most essential when you're out on the course or watching televised golf.

Golf Scoring Terms Cheat Sheet

Golf scoring terms explained.

Stroke -  In golf, a "Stroke" is any forward club swing, including when putting, that a golfer is trying to hit the ball. 

You can essentially use "Stroke" as a synonym for a shot/putt, but keep in mind that it also includes "whiffs" if you miss the ball when trying to hit it.

Par - " Par " is the number of strokes that an expert or " scratch golfer " is expected to need to complete a hole. 

Par always includes two putts for each hole. On a par-4 hole, a scratch golfer is supposed to reach the green in two strokes, then complete the hole with two putts.

Distance, or more specifically "effective distance" (the distance a hole plays after accounting for whether it's uphill/downhill, its elevation, etc.), is the main determining factor in a hole's par rating.

Here are the USGA 's distance guidelines for men:

  • Par-3 –  Up to 250 yards
  • Par-4 –  251 to 470 yards
  • Par-5 –  401 to 690 yards

For women, the USGA’s distance guidelines are:

  • Par-3 –  Up to 210 yards
  • Par-4 –  211 to 400 yards
  • Par-5 –  401 to 575 yards

The golf scoring term "Par" is also used to reference the combined par of a group of golf holes.

Full-length 18-hole golf courses include par-3, par-4, and par-5 holes. "Course Par" for the 18 holes will usually be between 69-73, with par-72 being most common for an 18-hole golf course.

Par can also be used for multiple rounds of golf. In the PGA tour, tournaments are usually played over four days, with 18 holes being played each day.

On a par-72 golf course, par for four rounds is 288. On leaderboards and television graphics, you'll usually be shown a professional golfers score relative to par for all holes played thus far in all days of the tournament. Sometimes their scores for individual rounds will also be shown or discussed.

Under Par -  The term "under par" describe a player's score when they've taken fewer strokes than par up to a given point of the golf course.

If a player took 3 strokes to complete a par-3, 3 strokes to complete a par-4, and 4 strokes to complete a par-5 hole, their score could be described as "two under par" or "-2".

bogey par golf

Over Par -  The term "over par" can describe a player's score relative to par when they've taken more strokes than par.

If a player took 4 strokes to complete a par-3, 6 strokes to complete a par-4, and 4 strokes to complete a par-5 hole, their score could be described as "two over par" or "+2".

Even -  "Even" ("E") can be used to describe a golfer's score when it is equal to the combined par of all holes that they've completed.

A golfer would be even through three holes if they took 4 strokes to complete a par-3, 3 strokes to complete a par-4, and 5 strokes to complete a par-5 hole.

Birdie -  A " Birdie " is when a golfer scores one less stroke than par on an individual golf hole. Ex: 2 strokes on a par-3 hole.

In 2019, the PGA Tour average number of birdies per round was just 3.68 . Justin Thomas led the way, averaging 4.58 birdies per round.

For average golfers, birdies (and even pars) are far more challenging to make than pros would indicate.

MyGolfSpy and TheGrint (a Golf GPS and Golf Handicapping App) analyzed how often users of TheGrint made par, birdie or better, bogey, double bogey, and triple bogey or worse.

As you can see in the chart below, golfers with a 16-20 handicap only average 0.3 birdies or better per round. TheGrint users at the same handicap range only make 3.6 pars per round.

Birdies, Pars, Bogeys Per Handicap - Source MyGolfSpy

It's not until golfer's in that study reached a handicap in the range of 1-5 that they started averaging more than 1 birdie per round (and 9 pars per round).

Eagle -  An " Eagle " is when a golfer scores two fewer strokes than par on an individual golf hole. Ex: 3 strokes on a par-5 hole.

Eagles are most commonly achieved by reaching a par-5 green in 2 strokes, then completing the hole with one putt.

Albatross / Double Eagle -  An " Albatross " or " Double Eagle " is when a golfer scores three fewer strokes than par on an individual golf hole. Ex: 2 strokes on a par-5 hole.

An Albatross is far rarer than even a hole-in-one (ace).

Condor -  A "Condor" is when a golfer scores four strokes less than par on an individual golf hole. A hole in one on a par 5 is a condor.

Only four condors have been recorded in PGA history. Generally, the only way to accomplish a condor is to massively "cut off" a "dogleg" par-5 golf hole for a hole-in-one.

Hole-in-One / Ace -  A "Hole-in-One" or "Ace" occurs when a golfer hits their first shot into the hole (cup), completing the hole in just one stroke. 

Aces are very rare. According to American Hole 'N One, the average golfer's chances of making a hole-in-one on a par-3 hole are 12,500 to 1. The odds improve for professional golfers at 2,500 to 1.

When aces do occur, it's almost always on a par-3 hole, though hole-in-ones have been accomplished on par-4 and even par-5 holes.

Par-3 at Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort - Source SuperSeeker

Par-3 at Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort - Source SuperSeeker

Bogey -  A " Bogey " is when a golfer scores one stroke OVER par. Ex: 5 strokes on a par-4 hole.

While a bogey is a bad result for a low handicap or professional golfer, new and less skilled golfers are often fine with only needing one more stroke than par to complete a hole. 

If you got a bogey on every hole of a par-72 course, you'd shoot a 90. This is a major milestone for newer golfers.

Double Bogey -  A "Double Bogey" is when a golfer scores two strokes OVER par. Ex: 6 strokes on a par-4 hole.

Triple Bogey -  A "Triple Bogey" is when a golfer scores three strokes OVER par. Ex: 7 strokes on a par-4 hole.

Quadruple Bogey -  A "Quadruple Bogey" is when a golfer scores four strokes OVER par. Ex: 8 strokes on a par-4 hole.

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Bogey to Blow-Up

There is quite a history behind the golfing terms bogey, par, birdie, eagle and albatross.

Bogey and par were central to the development of handicapping, pioneered by the LGU . The modern meaning of three of the terms - bogey, birdie and eagle - comes from their use in USA.

Bogey Par Birdie Eagle Albatross   Condor

"Bogey" was the first stroke system, developed in England at the end of the 19th Century. The full history is given in Robert Browning's History of Golf 1955 .

In 1890 Mr Hugh Rotherham Secretary of the Coventry Golf Club conceived the idea of standardising the number of shots at each hole that a good golfer should take, which he called the 'ground score.'

GreatYarmouth01

A 'bogle' was a Scottish goblin as far back as the 16th Century and a Bogey-man was a widely used term for a goblin or devil. Golfers of the time considered they were playing a Mister Bogey when measuring themselves against the bogey score. This allowed the introduction of bogey competitions, which we would call handicap competitions or stablefords. 

On 2nd January 1892, The Field reported that 'a novelty was introduced in the shape of a bogey tournament for a prize. ... Fourteen couples started but the bogey defeated them all.'

In 1892, Colonel Seely-Vidal, the Hon Secretary of the United Servic es Club at Gosport, also worked out the 'bogey' for his course. The United Club was a services club and all the members had a military rank. They could not measure themselves against a 'Mister' Bogey or have him as a member, so 'he' was given the honorary rank of Colonel. Thus the term 'Colonel Bogey' was born. 

Later, in the middle of 20th century, bogey was used as the term of one above par.

Par is derived from the stock exchange term that a stock may be above or below its normal or 'par' figure. In 1870, Mr AH Doleman, a golf writer, asked the golf professionals David Strath and James Anderson, what score would win 'The Belt', then the winning trophy for 'The Open', at Prestwick, where it was first held annually from 1861 to 1870. Strath and Anderson said that perfect play should produce a score of 49 for Prestwick's twelve holes. Mr Doleman called this 'par' for Prestwick and subsequently Young Tom Morris won with a score of two strokes 'over par' for the three rounds of 36 holes.

TomMorrisJnr04

In 1911, the United States Golf Association (Men) of the day laid down the following very modern distances for determining par:

As golf developed, scores were coming down, but many old British courses did not adjust their courses or their bogey scores, which meant good golfers and all the professionals were achieving lower than a bogey score. This meant the US had an up-to-date national standard of distances for holes, while the British bogey ratings were determined by each club and were no longer appropriate for professionals. The Americans began referring to one over par as a bogey, much to the British chagrin.

By 1914, British golf magazines were agitating for a ratings system similar to the US. However the Great War 1914-18 intervened and it was not until 1925 that a Golf Unions' Joint Advisory Committee of the British Isles was formed to assign Standard Scratch Scores (SSS), to golf courses in Great Britain and Ireland. Today, this committee is known as the Council of National Golf Unions (CONGU). It is the Golf Unions of each country (and not the Royal and Ancient) who determine pars and handicaps.

"Birdie", meaning a score of one stroke under Par, comes from the early 20th century American slang term "bird", meaning anything excellent. The September 1911 edition of Maclean Magazine described a golf shot as - '"bird" straight down the course, about two hundred and fifteen yards.'  

The Country Club in Atlantic City lay claim to the first use of the word 'birdie' itself, as mentioned on the USGA website. In 1962 the US greenkeepers' magazine reported a conversation with A B Smith. He recounted that, in 1898/9, he and his brother, William P Smith, and their friend, George A Crump, who later built Pine Valley, were playing the par-four second hole at Atlantic City, when Ab Smith's second shot went within inches of the hole. Smith said "That was a bird of shot" and claimed he should get double money if he won with one under par, which was agreed. He duly holed his putt to win with one under par and the three of them thereafter referred to such a score as a "birdie". The Atlantic City Club date the event to 1903.

AtlanticCityCC Birdie

Sea Eagle Fife

Ab Smith ( see Birdie above ) said that his group referred to two under as an 'eagle'.

By 1919 the term was being introduced to Britain, as when Mr H D Gaunt's explained the use of 'birdie' and 'eagle' that he met in Canada . For many years, eagle was always introduced as American terms, as in 1922 when  Cecil (Cecilia) Leitch described a putt for a 3 on a par-5 hole as 'securing what is known in American golfing parlance as an "eagle"' (Golf XII 1922 p 202). 

  Albatross

Albatross is the term for three under par and is a continuation of the birdie and eagle theme, but is in fact a British term. Ab Smith said his group used the phrase 'double eagle' for three under ( see Birdie above ), which is still the term most Americans and the name for their Double Eagle Club  (membership by invitation only).

Three under par is a very rare score and an albatross is a very rare bird. The exact origin is unclear but the first known reference in 1929 indicates that it had been in use for some time before then.  John G Ridland, who scored an 'albatross' in India in 1934 , theorized that it was the introduction of steel shafted clubs in 1920s which made this score common enough to necessitate a name for it. 

Durban CC Hole 18 L

Durban Country Club 18th Hole site of first recorded albatross, a hole-in-one on 271 yard par-4

The first ‘albatross’ score reported as such in the press is from South Africa when E E Wooler scored a hole-in-one in the summer of 1931 on the 18th hole of the Durban Country Club which is a par-4. It cost £40 in drinks but, had he known that he was making history, he would not have minded. 

More details of the first albatrosses, are given in   The Albatross has Landed  in News section. 

A 'condor' in golf is a score of four (4!) under par. This can be achieved by scoring a hole-in-one on a par-5 hole, or by taking two strokes on a par-6 hole, which are themselves as rare as hen's teeth. Until recently, the idea of a condor was not considered to be possible and certainly few people were aware that anyone had scored one.

Golfing condors have been recorded six times around the world over the last 60 years in the USA, the UK and Australia. Until 2020, they were all par-5 'aces'.   More details can be found here .

The Whaup and Double Bogeys

No standard terms for 2 or 3 or more over Par have emerged. They are just double and triple Bogeys. Depending upon how good you are, anything over 7, 8 or 9 will be a ‘Blow-up’ or a ‘Disaster’.

Joyce Wethered once suggested that a hole-in-one should be called a Curlew, known in Scottish as a 'Whaup', which, though fitting, did not catch on. 

It seems that golfing terms came into popular use in much the same way as you find new words being invented and used on the Internet. If they sound good, people start using them. What we do not hear about are all the terms, such as beantops , that never made it because they did not catch on. Only the future can tell which of the terms that we create will still be in use in a hundred years time.

Updated to add Condor 18th July 2023

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What Do Those Golf Scoring Terms (Birdies, Bogeys, Pars) Mean?

So you're new to the game of golf and you keep hearing references to birdies and bogeys, eagles and pars. What are those things, anyway? What do those golf scoring terms mean ?

Those (and other terms) are all names for different types of scores on an individual golf hole.

Start With Par, Go From There to Understand Golf Score Names

When explaining golf scoring terms, start with par, because all the other names of golf scores are defined in relation to par. "Par" refers to the number of strokes an expert golfer is expected to need to complete the play of one hole on a golf course.

Golf holes of different lengths will require more or fewer strokes by a golfer. And regardless of length, the par number of a hole always allows for two putts. So a 150-yard hole is one on which the expert is expected to hit the green with his tee shot, take two putts, and, therefore, require three strokes to finish that hole. Such a hole is therefore called a par-3.

And every hole on a golf course is rated as either a par-3, a par-4 or a par-5 (par-6 holes also exist, but they are rare).

A very good golfer — or a very lucky golfer — might complete a hole in fewer strokes than the par (called "under par"). And of course, most of us are not "experts" at golf, and so on most holes we'll need more strokes than the par (called "over par").

That's where those other terms — birdies, eagles, bogeys, and so on — come into play. They describe a golfer's performance on a hole in relation to the hole's par:

  • A birdie is a score of 1-under par on a hole (for example, scoring 4 on a par-5).
  • A bogey is 1-over par on a hole.
  • An eagle is 2-under par on a hole.
  • A double bogey is 2-over par on a hole.
  • A double eagle (very rare) is 3-under par (also called an "albatross").
  • A triple bogey is 3-over par.

Given that a par-5 hole is the highest par most golfers will ever see, there is a limit to how far under par a golfer can go. But a hole-in-one — knocking the ball in the hole with your first shot — is also called an "ace." (On a par-5 hole, making an ace means a golfer is 4-under on that hole and, yes, golfers have a term for that, too: condor.)

Scores over par can keep going up, and you just keep adding to the prefix, as in quadruple bogey, quintuple bogey, and so on. Here's hoping that's knowledge you'll never need.

The Actual Number of Strokes That Result in These Golf Scores

Here's what these most-common golf scoring terms mean for holes with pars of 5, 4 and 3, in the actual number of strokes:

  • Double eagle: On a par-5, means you finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 7 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 8 strokes
  • Double eagle: On a par-4, means you finished the hole in 1 stroke — a hole-in-one (very, very rare on par-4 holes)
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 7 strokes
  • Double eagle: Double eagles are not possible on par-3 holes (a score of 3-under on a par-3 would be zero)
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 1 stroke — a hole-in-one
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes

Note that any hole-in-one or ace will be called by those terms, rather than by double eagle (on a par-4) or eagle (on a par-3). After all, why use double eagle or eagle when you can call it a hole-in-one?

Another note about the alternative term for "double eagle": Albatross is the preferred term in most of the golfing world; double eagle is the preferred term in the United States.

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Golf Rule 32, Bogey Par And Stableford Competitions

Simplified Rules

video thumbnail

  • Note: Bogey, par and Stableford are competitions played under the stroke play format, with each player competing against a fixed score for each hole. The player with the most “wins” during the competition is the winner, as in match play.

In bogey (or par) competition, the object is to beat a score of bogey (or par) on as many holes as possible.

  • Example: Maurice scores a net 5 on the first hole, a par 5. In bogey competition, he would “win” the hole and go 1-up; in par competition, he would earn a halve and be all square. At round’s end, Maurice has 6 wins and 3 losses for an aggregate total of 3-up.

In Stableford competition, a point value is assigned for different scores on a hole (e.g., birdie, par, bogey). The player with the highest point total wins.

32-1. Stroke play rules apply to bogey, par and Stableford competitions, except where the rules are at odds with the specific rules in this section. If handicaps are being used, the player with the lowest net score on a hole (gross score minus any handicap strokes) has honors on the next tee.

In scoring bogey and par competitions, any hole on which no score is recorded is considered a loss. The player loses any hole on which he breaks Rule 4 (Clubs), Rule 6-4 (Caddie) or any local rule or condition of competition that carries a maximum per-round penalty. Any player not reporting a rules violation is disqualified.

A competitor who breaks Rule 6-3a (Time of Starting) by showing up late, but is on the tee and ready within five minutes of his tee time, is penalized with the loss of one hole on his total. The same applies if a player breaks Rule 6-7 (Undue Delay; Slow Play).

Stableford competitions are scored under the following point system:

Triple eagle (4-under par on a hole) – 6 points; double eagle – 5 points; eagle – 4 points; birdie – 3 points; par – 2 points; bogey – 1 point; double bogey or worse – 0 points.

A player who breaks any rule that carries a maximum per-round penalty must report the violation before turning in his scorecard; otherwise, he’s disqualified. When such a violation is reported, two points are deducted for each hole on which he broke the rule, up to a maximum of four points per round for each rule broken.

A competitor who breaks Rule 6-3a (Time of Starting) by showing up late, but is on the tee and ready within five minutes of his tee time, loses two points from his total. The same applies if a player breaks Rule 6-7 (Undue Delay; Slow Play).

The tournament committee can set pace-of-play guidelines imposing maximum times to play a shot, hole or round. In this case, a first violation brings a one-point penalty; a second violation earns an additional two-point penalty; a third violation results in disqualification.

32-2. Disqualification under any of these rules means disqualification from a bogey, par or Stableford competition: Rule 1-3 (Agreement to Waive Rules), Rule 3-4 (Refusal to Comply with a Rule), Rule 4 (Clubs), Rule 5-1 or 5-2 (the Ball), Rule 6-2b (Handicap), Rule 6-3 (Time of Starting and Groups), Rule 6-4 (Caddie), Rule 6-6b (Signing and Returning Score Card), Rule 6-6d (Wrong Score for Hole, unless the violation doesn’t change the result of the hole), Rule 6-7 (Undue Delay; Slow Play), Rule 6-8 (Discontinuance of Play), Rule 7-1 (Practice Before or Between Rounds), Rule 11-1 (Teeing), Rule 14-3 (Artificial Devices, Unusual Equipment and Unusual Use of Equipment), Rule 22-1 (Ball Assisting Play), or Rule 33-7 (Disqualification Penalty Imposed by Committee).

In all other instances where breaking a rule would bring disqualification, the player is only DQ’d for that particular hole.

32-1. Conditions Bogey, par and Stableford competitions are forms of stroke play in which play is against a fixed score at each hole. The Rules for stroke play, so far as they are not at variance with the following specific Rules, apply.

In handicap bogey, par and Stableford competitions, the competitor with the lowest net score at a hole takes the honor at the next teeing ground.

a. Bogey and Par Competitions The scoring for bogey and par competitions is made as in match play.

Any hole for which a competitor makes no return is regarded as a loss. The winner is the competitor who is most successful in the aggregate of holes.

The marker is responsible for marking only the gross number of strokes for each hole where the competitor makes a net score equal to or less than the fixed score.

bogey par golf

b. Stableford Competitions

The winner is the competitor who scores the highest number of points.

The marker is responsible for marking only the gross number of strokes at each hole where the competitor’s net score earns one or more points.

32-2. Disqualification Penalties

a. From the Competition b. For a Hole In all other cases where a breach of a Rule would result in disqualification, the competitor is disqualified only for the hole at which the breach occurred.

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Bogey Golf: The Ultimate Strategy on How to Play Bogey Golf

bogey golf tips how to be a bogey golfer

Bogey golf is when you score one more than the posted par score on a golf hole. For some amateur golfers, it’s a real accomplishment!

This article will cover bogey golf and how to be a bogey golfer. Keep scrolling below for specific tips on how to be a better bogey golfer off your drive, approach, and on the green.

Remember, you can’t score par until you know how to bogey!

Key Takeaways

  • Bogey golf involves scoring one stroke over par on each hole, a great accomplishment for amateur golfers.
  • Double, triple, and quadruple bogeys indicate higher scores above par and should be minimized.
  • The term ‘bogey’ originated in Scotland and England in the late 1800s, representing golf’s original ‘par’ score.
  • A bogey golfer’s handicap score is 90, which many golfers find satisfactory.
  • To play bogey golf, focus on hitting straight woods and irons and only putt a maximum of two times per hole.

Table of Contents

What is a bogey in golf.

A bogey in golf is shooting one stroke over what the par on that individual hole is.

  • On a par 3, a bogey is a score of 4.
  • On a par 4, a bogey is a score of 5.
  • On a par 5, a bogey is a score of 6.

Is Bogey Golf Good?

A bogey is not a bad score in the game of golf. For lots of casual golfers, bogey golf is a great goal!

Golf is a challenging sport to learn. If you are starting out, shooting one stroke over a particular hole’s par rating is a great accomplishment. Most golfers are content to be bogey golfers!

bogey golf scorecard

What is a Double Bogey in Golf?

On top of just a regular bogey, a double bogey means shooting two strokes over that hole’s par rating.

  • On a par 3, a double bogey is a score of 5
  • On a par 4, a double bogey is a score of 6
  • On a par 5, a double bogey is a score of 7

For most regular golfers, a double bogey is easily achievable. You can hit one or two bad shots and still save a double bogey score.

Is Double Bogey Golf Good?

Double bogey golf, where a player averages a score of two over par on each hole, isn’t considered as proficient as bogey golf. However, it is still a reasonable standard of play for many weekend golfers and beginners.

Double bogey golf represents a stage in a golfer’s development where they are still learning the game’s nuances and improving their skills. While there’s room to grow from a double bogey standard, achieving this level of play can still offer a satisfying and enjoyable golfing experience.

Remember, the most important part of golf is to enjoy playing the game, and as long as you are doing that, you’re doing great.

What is a Triple Bogey in Golf? Quadruple Bogey?

Triple bogey and quadruple bogey are other scores in golf and mean exactly as they sound.

  • A triple bogey means shooting three strokes over par.
  • A quadruple bogey means shooting four strokes over par.

These scores are worse than just a regular or double bogey and will quickly increase your score on the scorecard.

Below, we will review a few things you can do as a golfer to limit double bogeys and these other higher scores.

Birdie, Eagle, and Albatross

If you are lucky enough to score under par on a hole, you’ll need to understand what a birdie, eagle, and an albatross is.

  • A birdie means shooting one stroke under a hole’s par rating.
  • An eagle means shooting two strokes under par.
  • An albatross means shooting three strokes under par (usually a 2 on a par 5)!

These scores are really good because they help to offset bogeys that you get on other holes.

What does the word bogey mean?

“bogey” originated in Scotland and England in the late 1800s. It was slang related to the quest for finding the “bogey man” being as hard as getting a perfect score on a golf hole.

When scoring criteria were first introduced on British golf courses, bogey represented the result that the best players were expected to achieve on each hole.

As the game evolved, so did the scoring measures and terms used to describe them. Eventually, all golf courses moved this route, with the bogey showing one stroke above the expected result on each hole.

Is scoring a bogey in golf bad?

It depends on your skill level out on the golf course.

For professional golfers, known as a scratch golfer , getting a bogey is typically considered a bad score. Professional golfers aim to shoot under par, meaning a bogey adds more strokes to their score than they would like.

Only a small percentage of golfers are scratch golfers, so this only applies to a few.

For amateur golfers, a bogey can be viewed as an average to a good score, depending on the hole and how challenging the golf course is.

A bogey can be considered a great score for recreational golfers.

Golf is a challenging sport to pick up and learn. If you can hit the ball consistently to get within one stroke over par, you can consider that a success.

Golf Accessories Every Bogey Golfer Should Have

To play better golf, there are a few key accessories that we think all bogey golfers should invest in:

  • Golf Shoes : Proper shoes (spiked or spikeless) give you extra traction on the golf course, which helps you hit more solid golf shots.
  • Golf Glove : Like your shoes, proper gloves prevent your hands from slipping on your golf club’s grip. This will help you hit more solid shots.
  • Golf GPS or Watch : To be better at golf, you must know how far you can hit each club. A golf GPS watch or rangefinder will help you dial in your distances and help you pick the right club for each situation.

Shop some of the top golf accessories for bogey golfers below. Click here to view tons of other gifts for golfers .

FootJoy Men's FJ Fuel Golf Shoe, White/Black/Orange, 11

A Bogey Golfer’s Average Golf Score

If you finish with a bogey score at the end of 18 holes, your average score will be 90.

Ask yourself:

Would you be happy if you had a score of 90 on a golf round?

How To Play Bogey Golf

If you are looking to score lower , you first need to master how play bogey golf off the tee, on your approach, pitching, chipping, and putting.

If you aim to play bogey golf, your tee shot becomes critical. Before your shot, you will want to check out the fairway and decide which side of the fairway would be best to land on for a better approach shot into the green.

If the hole is a dogleg left or right, it will make sense to try and get the best view at the green without any obstacles or trees in the way.

This plays the same for a par 3. Look at where the hole is located on the green, then decide which side of the green you want to aim at. This will give you the best look at your second shot.

As a bogey golfer, it is important that your tee shot lands in the fairway or light rough so that you can hit a pure approach shot.

To improve your tee shot, watch this video below! It helped me save strokes off of the tee box.

TOP 5 DRIVER GOLF TIPS - IMPORTANT DO'S & DON'TS!

Approach Shot

Once you have your ball on the fairway (or not), you have to aim your approach shot and decide where to attempt to land the ball on the green. Take a look at where the flag is located.

At most golf courses, there is some indicator on the flagstick to tell you if it is situated in the green’s front, middle, or back.

Another helpful tip I’ve found is to club up on your irons. In most cases, clubbing up will help remove the slope and wind that may be a factor in the course. It also should ensure that you have enough club to get up to the green and past the hole, leaving you an easy chip back near the pin.

You want your approach shot straight towards the hole so that even if you are short or deep, you have a clear next shot.

Pitching and Chipping

When up near the green, you must be careful with pitching and chipping to limit yourself to a bogey.

One helpful tip is that if you can putt the ball from off the green, you should.

If you need to chip, always watch the ball. Place the ball back in your stance and let the wedge’s loft get underneath to pop the ball up and toward your target.

You don’t want to be super aggressive because that will have you sending the ball way past the hole. You will often want to use your pitching or approach wedge , which has the perfect loft for these types of shots.

The goal is to get the ball to stop as close to the hole as possible.

To be a bogey golfer, it is important that you never putt more than two times on the green on a single hole. This will limit the number of strokes you add to your scorecard when you play golf .

To limit your putts, you need to master your putting weight. You don’t want to be super aggressive because that will have you putting way past the hole. Try to read the slope rating of the green as best as possible.

If you are on the green in regulation, you will also have a great look to score par with a two-putt.

how to play bogey golf putting

What is a Bogey Golf Handicap?

A bogey golf handicap refers to a handicap of 18 for a standard 18-hole course. This is calculated based on the idea that the golfer will make a bogey, or one over par, on each hole.

According to the United States Golf Association , a bogey golfer is considered a golfer with a course handicap of 20 on a course of standard difficulty. You usually shoot about 20 strokes over the golf course’s par.

If you were to bogey every hole on the golf course, you would be 18 over par. This does equate to an 18 handicap, but several other factors are also taken into consideration.

It is a clear sign of a golfer who has moved beyond beginner status and can maintain a consistent playstyle over the course of a round.

Most amateurs would be happy averaging a bogey per hole, but would you?

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is a bogey on golf.

In golf, a bogey is a score of one stroke over par on a particular hole.

What is a birdie, bogey, and eagle in golf?

In golf, a birdie is a score of one stroke under par on a hole, a bogey is a score of one stroke over par on a hole, and an eagle is a score of two strokes under par on a hole.

Is a bogey better than a birdie?

No, a birdie is better than a bogey in golf as it is a score of one stroke under par while a bogey is a score of one stroke over par

Is bogey worse than par?

Yes, bogey is worse than par in golf as it means taking one more stroke than the set par for a particular hole.

What’s worse than a bogey in golf?

In golf, a double bogey is worse than a bogey, which means taking two more strokes than the set par for a particular hole.

What is 18 holes of golf called?

In golf, playing a full round of golf consisting of 18 holes is called a “round of golf.”

What are bad golfers called?

There is no specific term for bad golfers, but sometimes the term “hackers” or “duffers” is used.

What does E stand for in golf score?

In golf, “E” stands for “even,” which means the golfer has completed a hole or a round with a score that is equal to par.

What is the purpose of a golf handicap?

The purpose of a golf handicap is to allow golfers of different skill levels to compete fairly against each other. The handicap system adjusts a golfer’s score based on their skill level, so that they can compete on an even playing field with other golfers.

Ryan William

Ryan William

With over 25 years hands-on experience in the golfing world, Ryan is not just an avid golfer but a topical authority. His journey has had him delve deep into the nuances of the sport, from mastering the swing to understanding new golf technology. As an entrepreneur, Ryan is at the forefront of the latest golf trends, reviewing all new clubs, accessories, and training aids. His insights and expertise are backed by a prolific writing career, with over 1000 articles published across various platforms. Ryan's commitment is clear: to guide and inform the golf community with unparalleled knowledge and passion.

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Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Eagle, Birdie, Albatross, and More)

Golf Scoring Terms

Golf, a sport that melds skill, strategy, and a touch of finesse, comes with its own rich vocabulary of Golf scoring terms . From the familiar Stroke to the elusive Condor , each term encapsulates a moment on the course, a stroke of the club that defines a golfer’s journey. Let’s unravel the language of golf scoring and explore the nuances of Stroke, Par, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross , and more.

Normal Loft of a Pitching Wedge in Golf.

Table of contents: golf scoring terms., stroke: the fundamental unit, par: the benchmark of performance, even: a perfect balance, bogey: a minor setback, double bogey, triple bogey, quadruple bogey: escalating challenges, birdie: soaring above par, eagle: majestic mastery, albatross / double eagle: rare and remarkable, condor: the mythical marvel, hole-in-one / ace: a stroke of perfection, conclusion: a tapestry of golfing moments, faqs: golf scoring terms..

bogey par golf

Understanding the Basics: Stroke and Par

At the heart of golf scoring is the concept of a Stroke . This term refers to each time a golfer takes a swing at the ball. Every stroke counts, and the cumulative total shapes the scorecard at the end of a round.

Par sets the standard for each hole on the course. It represents the number of strokes a skilled golfer is expected to take to complete the hole. Scoring Under Par means completing the hole in fewer strokes, while going Over Par signifies a score higher than the expected number.

When a golfer matches the expected number of strokes for a hole, they achieve Even . It’s a moment of equilibrium, where the player’s performance aligns precisely with the course’s design.

Golf Swing Pull With Left Arm or Push With Right.

bogey par golf

Navigating Challenges: Bogey and Beyond

A Bogey occurs when a golfer completes a hole in one stroke over par. It’s a minor setback, a stumble on the path to perfection. While not a disastrous outcome, it signifies room for improvement.

As the number of strokes surpasses par, golfers encounter the escalating challenges of Double Bogey , Triple Bogey , and Quadruple Bogey . Each increment represents a greater struggle on the course, urging players to regroup and refocus.

The Golf swing left arm dominant: Unraveling the Technique

Pinnacle achievements: birdie, eagle, albatross, condor, hole-in-one.

A Birdie is cause for celebration, earned by completing a hole in one stroke less than par. It reflects skillful play, strategic thinking, and the ability to outperform the course’s expectations.

Achieving an Eagle involves completing a hole two strokes under par. It’s a majestic feat, showcasing a golfer’s mastery over the course and their capability to navigate challenges with finesse.

The Albatross , or Double Eagle , is a rare and remarkable accomplishment in golf. It occurs when a golfer finishes a hole three strokes under par, a testament to extraordinary skill and precision.

A Condor is the stuff of golfing legends. This term is reserved for completing a hole four strokes under par, an exceedingly rare occurrence that few golfers can claim. It’s a mythical marvel, etching the player’s name in golfing history.

The pinnacle of golfing achievement is the Hole-in-One , also known as an Ace . It occurs when a golfer successfully sinks the ball in the cup with just one stroke from the tee. It’s a stroke of perfection, a moment that resonates in the memory of every golfer fortunate enough to experience it.

The Right Foot Back Golf Swing: A Game-Changer.

In the world of golf, each swing tells a story. The scoring terms woven into the fabric of the game add depth and meaning to a golfer’s journey. From the routine strokes to the rare and extraordinary, these terms capture the essence of the sport—a pursuit of excellence, a battle with the course, and the thrill of achieving the seemingly impossible.

As you navigate the golf course, let these scoring terms be your guide, shaping your narrative and adding color to each round. Embrace the challenges, celebrate the victories, and revel in the rich tapestry of golfing moments.

Golf scoring terms denote the number of strokes a player takes on a hole relative to the standard.

Achieving an Albatross, or a score of three strokes under par on a hole, is extremely rare and signifies exceptional skill.

Yes, overall score matters more than individual hole scores. Consistency across the round is crucial for competitive golf.

Scoring an Eagle involves completing a hole two strokes under par, while a Birdie is one stroke under par.

Understanding scoring terms helps players assess their performance, set goals, and refine strategies for a more successful and enjoyable golf experience.

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What Is A Bogey In Golf?

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What Is A Bogey

Learn what a bogey in golf is here.

What  Is A Bogey In Golf?

A bogey in golf is one of the most common terms, with golfers of all abilities producing at least a few every round.

But what is a bogey? We find out here.

What Is A Bogey In Golf?

A bogey is where a player takes one more shot than the par of the hole. So if a player is playing a par-3 and they make a four, or they are playing a par-4 and make five, it is a bogey.

Moreover, there are other variations of a bogey. For example, a double bogey is where you make two shots more than the par of the hole, and a triple bogey is where you take three shots more than the par.

Bogies are common during a round of golf, but sometimes it has been known for Tour players to complete a 72-hole tournament without a single dropped shot.

Related:  What Is A Birdie In Golf?

The first player to complete a 72-hole PGA Tour event without a bogey was Lee Trevino, who won the 1974 Greater New Orleans Open.

The longest bogey-free streak recorded on Tour came from Jin Young Ko in 2019, who eclipsed Tiger Woods' record of 110 holes without a bogey.

Making a bogey in the third round of the Women's Open Championship, she would then play (and win) the CP Women's Open with nothing worse than a par.

Related:  What Is Strokeplay In Golf?

Finally, on the ninth hole of the Cambia Portland Classic, Ko made a bogey. Ending her streak at 114  holes in a row.

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Matt joined Golf Monthly in February 2021 covering weekend news, before also transitioning to equipment and testing. After freelancing for Golf Monthly and The PGA for 18 months, he was offered a full-time position at the company in October 2022 and continues to cover weekend news and social media, as well as help look after Golf Monthly’s many buyers’ guides and equipment reviews.

Taking up the game when he was just seven years of age, Matt made it into his county squad just a year later and continues to play the game at a high standard, with a handicap of around 2-4. To date, his best round came in 2016, where he shot a six-under-par 66 having been seven-under through nine holes. He currently plays at Witney Lakes in Oxfordshire and his favourite player is Rory McIlroy, despite nearly being struck by his second shot at the 17th during the 2015 BMW PGA Championship.

Matt’s current What’s In The Bag?

Driver: Honma TW747, 8.75°

Fairway Wood: TaylorMade Rocketballz Stage 2, 15°, 19°

Hybrid: Adams Super Hybrid, 22°

Irons: Mizuno MP54, 5-PW

Wedges: Cleveland 588 RTX 2.0 Tour Satin, 50°, 56°, 60°

Putter: Cleveland TFI 2135 Satin Cero

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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Golf Scoring Term: Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle and More

Golf Scoring Term

Are you a beginner golfer trying to wrap your head around all of the lingo? Scoring terminology can be one of the most confusing topics for golfers. From birdies to bogies, there are lots of terms that every golfer needs to know. In this blog post, we’ll cover some essential scoring vocabulary and what it means on the course. So get ready to hit the links feeling more confident in your understanding of golf scoring terminology!

Read more: Golf Foursomes Guide : How Does It Work?

Table of Contents

What Are The Common Terms Used In Golf Scoring?

Score: This is the total number of shots a golfer has taken to get their ball into the hole (a round of golf consists of 18 holes). A score can be expressed in either gross or net.

Gross Score: The total number of strokes taken by a golfer on each hole, with no allowances for handicaps. For example, if a golfer scored 5 on the first hole, 4 on the second and so on, their gross score would be 73.

Net Score: A net score is calculated by subtracting any handicap allowance from the golfer’s gross score. For example, if a player with a 16 handicap shot a gross score of 74, their net score would be 58.

Par : This is the number of shots an average golfer should take to get their ball into the hole. The par for each hole can vary, but a standard round of golf usually has a par of 72 (which means 18 holes with a par 4).

Bogey : A bogey is a single stroke above par. So if a golfer takes 5 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a bogey.

Double Bogey: A double bogey is two strokes above par. So if a golfer takes 6 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a double bogey.

Triple Bogey: A triple bogey is three strokes above par. So if a golfer takes 7 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a triple bogey.

Quadruple Bogey: A quadruple bogey is four strokes above par. So if a golfer takes 8 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a quadruple bogey.

Birdie : A birdie is a single stroke under par, so if a golfer takes 3 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a birdie.

Eagle : An eagle is two strokes under par. So if a golfer takes 2 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored an eagle.

Albatross /Double Eagle: An albatross is three strokes under par. So if a golfer takes 1 shot to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored an albatross.

Condor: A condor is four strokes under par. So if a golfer takes 0 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a condor.

Ace/Hole in One : An ace is a shot made from the tee into the hole with one stroke. A golfer with an ace on a par 4 has scored a hole-in-one.

Scorecard: A scorecard is used to record each player’s score for each hole. It also includes information such as the course, par for each hole, number of holes played, and other important information. The scorecard is used to track a golfer’s progress over time.

Stableford Points: Stableford points are awarded based on a golfer’s performance in relation to par on each hole. For each stroke taken under or above par, a golfer earns points. These points are tallied up at the end of the round and used to rank players in competitions and tournaments.

Handicap: A handicap is an indication of a golfer’s playing level, relative to other golfers. It is calculated using the scores from previous rounds and is used to give every player an equal chance in tournaments and competitions. A lower handicap indicates a better player, while a higher handicap indicates a less experienced golfer.

What Are The Difference Between Even-Par, Under-Par, and Over-Par Scores?

Golf Scoring Terms

Golf Scoring Term

A player can earn different types of scores based on their performance on the course. These scores include even-par, under-par, and over-par, and they provide insight into how well a player performed compared to the expected level of play.

When a golfer scores even-par, it means they have completed the course in the expected number of strokes. For example, if a golfer completes a par-72 course with a score of 72, they have achieved an even-par score. This is considered a solid performance, as the golfer has met the expected level of play.

An under-par score is achieved when a golfer completes the course in fewer strokes than expected. For example, if a golfer completes a par-72 course with a score of 69, they have achieved an under-par score of 3. This is a highly desirable score, as it indicates the golfer has performed better than expected.

An over-par score is earned when a golfer completes the course in more strokes than expected. For example, if a golfer completes a par-72 course with a score of 76, they have earned an over-par score of 4. This is a less desirable score, as it indicates the golfer has performed worse than expected.

It’s important to note that the par for a course can vary depending on the course’s difficulty level, so a score of even-par, under-par, or over-par may have different meanings from course to course. Additionally, different golf tournaments may have different expectations for player scores based on factors such as weather conditions or course setup.

How To Calculate Your Golf Score Using A Simple Formula?

Calculating your golf score may seem intimidating at first, but it’s actually quite simple. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to calculate your golf score using a simple formula:

Determine the par for the course: The first step in calculating your golf score is to determine the par for the course you’re playing. Par is the number of strokes a skilled golfer should take to complete a hole or a course.

  • Keep track of your strokes: Throughout the game, keep track of the number of strokes you take on each hole. Write it down on a scorecard or use a golf GPS app to track your shots.
  • Subtract the par from your total strokes: Once you’ve completed the round, subtract the total number of strokes you took from the par of the course. This will give you your score for the round.
  • For example, let’s say you played a round on a par-72 course and you took 90 strokes. To calculate your score, simply subtract 72 from 90: 90 – 72 = 18. Your score for the round is 18 over par.

Strokes – Handicap adjustment = Scores

You can even use this formula to compare different rounds and find out which course you perform better on. Just remember to always subtract any handicaps before you divide, and your golf score will be accurate every time.

You can learn about how to calculate golf Handicaps in the article: What Are Golf Handicaps? Meaning & How To Calculate

Final Thoughts

Understanding golf scoring terms is an important part of gameplay. Increasing your knowledge of these terms enhances your overall performance on the course and can help you become a better golfer. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced player, it is essential to know the proper terminology for strokes, pars, birdies and bogeys.

Taking the time to brush up on golf scoring terms will benefit not just your game but also the way that other players perceive your play. As shown in this blog post, having a deep understanding of golf rules and their associated terminology can help you make smarter decisions during gameplay which could ultimately propel you to have more consistent lower scores.

Alvin Daniel

Hello everyone, I'm Alvin Daniel. I was born in the Philippines and came to the United States when I was 16 years old. I started playing golf at that age and have loved it ever since. I turned professional when I was 21 and have been working as a golf instructor and guide ever since. My goal is to help everyone know more about this great game of golf. And, hopefully, through my instruction, they can improve their skills and enjoy the game even more.

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What Is a Good Score in Golf? How Much In 18 Holes & 9 Holes

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What Is A Bogey In Golf (And Double Bogey)

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Kolter Knutson

“You made a bogey there,” you might hear your golf buddies say. Of course, you laugh along and continue playing. But in the back of your mind, you have a question you don’t want to ask them. What in the world is a bogey in golf terminology ?

A bogey in golf is a term for going over par by one shot. Different holes have different par ratings, and if you take more shots than expected to complete that hole, you might have multiple bogeys on your scorecard.

In this article, you will learn all you need to know about par ratings and how to minimize bogeys by staying close to the net par. You will also discover how common golf bogies are for golfers with different experience levels.

By the end of this post, you’ll understand how the golf bogey can affect your game.

What Is A Golf Bogey?

What Is A Bogey

A bogey is a score that is over the standard par of a hole by one shot. If a player is one over par for any hole, he’s made a bogey . Different holes have different part ratings, and staying within those prevents bogeys.

The more bogeys a golfer makes, the higher his score. So every bogey brings one closer to losing unless one’s competitors make as many bogeys.

Even a single bogey can give pause to a pro golfer. But it isn’t unheard of for hobbyists to make multiple bogeys throughout the course.

What Is A Double Bogey?

What Is A Double Bogey

A double bogey results from going two pars over the standard par of a hole. If you take two more shots than are standard for a hole, you’ve made a double bogey. But if you go one over par in two different holes, you’ve made two bogeys.

To make a double bogey, you have to go over par by two shots in the same hole. You can offset the effects of a double bogey by going one under par in the next two holes or two under par in a single hole.

Understanding bogey management is much easier once you learn more about going over par.

Going Over Par: A Brief Explanation

Going Over Par A Brief Explanation

There are eighteen holes in a standard golf course, and each hole has a specific par rating. This rating indicates the number of shots an average player takes to get the ball in that hole.

When you take fewer shots than the average to get the same hole, your performance is considered higher than average. The opposite is also true, which is why going over par is such a big deal.

So What Is A Par?

So What Is A Par

Par, in general, means “average,” “norm,” and even “median” in some contexts. A par in golf simply refers to the number of shots a golfer is expected to take to complete the hole. A masterful golfer might hole out with half as many shots as the par rating.

On the other hand, a beginner might make 18 bogeys in the course of a single game. “Par,” by definition, refers to the average, and it is hard to expect people with different experience levels to perform on par with each other.

Is Going Over Par Good Or Bad?

Is Going Over Par Good Or Bad

A high score is good in sports like basketball, soccer, and football. But in Golf, the point of achievement (holes) is fixed, and all players must complete all the holes.

Therefore, the competitive decision is made based on the number of shots one takes to complete a hole. The goal of a golfer is to hole out as much as he can with as few shots as possible.

Since the par rating refers to the average number of shots it takes to complete a hole, going over displays poor performance. If a hole is par-4, the average player makes four shots to finish it.

There’s a chance that someone aces that hole with a single shot. That would indicate that he is under par by 3 shots, which is great. But if the same player needs to make 7 shots to complete a hole that an average player completes in 4 shots, he’s over par by 3 shots, which is bad.

When getting into golf from a standard sports background, it is easy to confuse score for achievement.

But the score in golf doesn’t track achievement. It tracks attempts. The par rating is, therefore, the average attempts required, and needing more attempts is a sign of poor performance.

What Are The Consequences Of Going Over Par?

What Are The Consequences Of Going Over Par

Once you start seeing “par” in golf as “average attempts,” you can easily see that going under par indicates good performance. But is par symbolic? Or are there consequences to going over it?

The par rating isn’t designed as an external judgment tool. It is designed as a self-assessment metric. When you go over par for a particular hole, you have a poorer-than-average performance for it. Going over par has no obligatory consequences, though.

You might make a bogey, but your opponent might make a triple bogey. In such a situation, you going over par means nothing because you’re still not as over par as your opponent.

It is tough to keep track of the score throughout 18 holes. So, trying to keep yourself under par is a good measure. If you go over par in one hole, you can go under par by the same degree in the next hole to even out your performance.

Going over par has consequences only when your opponent has been on par or under the par rating for most holes throughout the game.

Why Is There A Par Rating In Golf?

Why Is There A Par Rating In Golf

A par rating in golf is set to establish an average for expert golfers to achieve. It is a self-assessment tool that helps pro golfers keep track of their performance.

For new golfers and semi-serious amateurs, the par rating is aspirational. But for professional golfers, it is a baseline for the expected average, and falling below it means their performance is below average for their tier of performance.

How Much Can You Go Over Par In Golf?

How Much Can You Go Over Par In Golf

You can go over par by up to 3 shots across 18 holes and recover even if you’re playing the tour. When playing golf with your friends, you can go over par by as many shots as you like as long as your overall score remains lower than theirs.

That said, you can expect the following golf performance in relation to par ratings for different contexts:

  • Fresh Golfer – 24 to 48 net over par – When you start golf, you can take 100 to 120 shots to complete an 18-hole course. That’s a total of 24 to 48 shots over the expert par rating. 
  • A golfer with one month of experience -18 to 38 over par – With one month of practice, you can shave off 6 to 10 shots from your course completion, coming slightly close to the total par rating of all the holes in the course. 
  • A golfer with 6 months of experience – 10 to 28 over par – With 6 months of experience, you can expect to start completing some holes under par. If your overall performance is 10 over par, you’ve completed at least 8 holes on par. 
  • A golfer with 1 year of experience – 5 to 23 over par – After golfing for one year, you can start performing under par in more holes. However, you could still make multiple bogeys throughout the game, depending on how often you play. 
  • A golfer with 3 years of experience – 3 to 18 over par – With three years of experience, you can start performing net under par. But not all golfers train the same. Some golfers might take three years to reach the level where they make one bogey per hole throughout the game.

How To Reduce Bogeys In Golf?

How To Reduce Bogeys In Golf

Reducing bogeys can help you reduce your overall score in golf. But you cannot expect to eliminate bogeys, especially if you don’t have a decade of golfing experience. A realistic way to minimize bogeys in golf is to get more course time.

Here are a few things you can do to bring your performance closer to the net par of expert golfers.

  • Play more strategically – Don’t try to ace every hole. Trying to get the perfect round will only increase the bogeys you make. Start thinking strategically and playing with the shots you have available in a par. For a par-4 hole, try to use all four shots in a way that each shot feeds the next. 
  • Practice more often – Nothing can replace practice in improving your game. So you have to practice more often to reduce bogeys. 
  • Get fitted for equipment – Golf is one of the few sports where you can get equipment customized to your height, physique, and natural swing. Getting equipment that maximizes your performance can minimize bogeys. 
  • Focus on your short game – Even if you don’t have time to play entire rounds, you can practice putting, pitching, and chipping. This can help you improve in areas where most bogeys are made. 
  • Don’t think about bogeys – Finally, as counterproductive as it might seem, not thinking about them is perhaps the best way to minimize them. When you start putting more emphasis on the par rating, you raise the mental stakes and get nervous.

The Golf Bogey: Final Thoughts

Final Thoughts

A bogey in golf refers to going over par by one shot. Unless you’re an expert golfer, you can expect to make at least 18 bogeys. The par rating for a hole is the average number of shots an expert golfer takes to complete a hole.

And unless you’re an expert, it is just an aspirational minimum you should try to achieve with regular practice and strategic gameplay.

Kolter Knutson

Meet Kolter, the dedicated golfer driving Honest Golfers forward. His golfing journey started at the young age of 8, guiding him through youth tours, high school, and college golf. With a remarkable stint as a two-time Team Captain at Carroll College, Helena, MT, and participation as a two-time World Long Drive regional qualifier, Kolter's expertise runs deep. Now, he shares his lifelong passion and knowledge, offering sincere advice and gear recommendations to fellow enthusiasts. Embark on a golfing adventure with him, and together, let's enhance our skills on the fairways.

Texas Golf Blog

Bogey Golf VS Par Golf: Understanding The Difference

Bogey golf and par golf.

The difference between bogey and par golf can greatly affect your game. Par is the number of strokes an expert should take to finish a hole. Playing at this level is called par golf . Bogey golf is one stroke over par. To be a par golfer, one needs skill and practice. It’s a great starting point for beginners.

Aim to play the same strokes in each round. Bogey golfers can still progress by improving their strategy and avoiding double-bogies, which affect the scorecard.

Pro players find it hard to stay under par each round or hole. You shouldn’t compare yourself to experts. Don’t be too tough on yourself. Why settle for a birdie when you can be a bogey king?

slice-in-golf

What is Bogey Golf?

To understand the concept of bogey golf in golf, with the challenges a bogey golfer faces, you need to grasp the idea behind bogey golf. In short, bogey golf refers to playing a round of golf where you consistently score 1 over par on each hole. Now, let’s explore the sub-sections to gain further insight. First, we’ll dive into understanding the concept of bogey in golf, and then we’ll take a look at the challenges faced by golfers trying to attain bogey golf.

Understanding the Concept of Bogey in Golf

Bogey golf is a term used in golfing to describe a score of one over par on a hole . It means the golfer took one more shot than expected. For example, on a par 4 hole, a score of 5 would be a bogey.

This may sound negative, but it’s an improvement from double bogeys or worse for beginners and amateurs. Bogey golf varies based on skill level and course difficulty. Shooting bogeys isn’t a good performance for pros, but for newbies, it’s a positive milestone towards breaking par.

Understanding bogey golf provides context for understanding scores and performance in golf. Every stroke taken counts towards achieving goals – whether they’re aiming to shoot under par or improve their overall score.

So don’t forget to celebrate progress and milestones – embrace your inner bogey golfer and see where it takes you on the course!

Challenges Faced by a Bogey Golfer

Golfer with Average Score? Embrace the Chaos!

As a golfer with a bogey score, you face hurdles. Consistent ball striking and putting accuracy can be tough, leading to missed chances and higher scores. Focus for longer is also key to stopping errors that cost shots.

Adverse weather and course conditions, such as fast greens and uneven lies, can test your ability to control the ball’s trajectory. Thus, practicing technique and building mental stamina for success is important.

Different course layouts are another challenge, especially for golfers who rely on technology or playing style. However, cultivating flexibility in strategy formulation and execution can help overcome these obstacles.

Why aim for par? Embrace the chaos and aim for bogey golf!

What is Par Golf?

To understand the difference between bogey golf and par golf, you need to first know what par is in golf. With a focus on par on a golf course, this section explains the definition and importance of par along with the types of golfers and their scores. Get ready to explore more about this exciting world of golf!

Definition and Importance of Par on the Golf Course

Par sets the standard for a skilled golfer’s strokes per hole on a golf course. Course management and strategic shot selection help achieve par or lower scores. Comparing your score to par per hole is essential to measure performance. Par can be challenging, but accomplished players can achieve it over several rounds. The higher your score above par , the tougher the terrain. Power and precision are key, as each fairway and green demands unique shots.

Tour players compete in 72-hole tournaments ; their cumulative strokes relative to par decide the leaderboard. Handicap numbers level out differences between players’ abilities, so they can fairly compete. Jack Nicklaus is famous for his 18 major championships , achieved by driving long distances off tees and staying within par range for greens .

No matter your skill, your aiming score will show how much you need luck.

Types of Golfers and Their Aiming Score

Golf is a game of accuracy and precision. You must hit a ball using various clubs into a series of holes on a course. Golfers have different levels of skill, which affects their aiming score. Let’s have a look at these golfers:

Amateurs focus on hitting the ball hard and far. Pros focus on accuracy and precision. Recreational players enjoy the game for fun and relaxation.

Par is not the same for all golf courses. It changes based on the length and difficulty of each hole.

PGA.com states that professional golfers average 69-70 strokes per tournament round. That is under par compared to the expected average of 72 strokes.

Why not aim for greatness with par golf instead of just going with bogey golf?

Differences Between Bogey Golf and Par Golf

To understand the differences between bogey golf and par golf, you need to know about the scoring system and strategies and the mindset and approach of each type of golfer. In the following sections, we’ll briefly explore these sub-sections and their solutions to help you differentiate between them.

Scoring System and Strategies

Golf Scoring and Approach can be different between Bogey and Par Golf. Bogey requires one to three shots more than par, while Par is the same or less.

Scoring System:

  • Bogey Golf: One to three over par.
  • Par Golf: Same or under par.

Average Score Per Round:

  • Bogey Golf: 91-108 strokes likely.
  • Par Golf: 72 strokes on average (pro).

Mindset Strategy:

  • Bogey Golfers focus on minimizing part of the round. They practice swing planes, club speed, and short-game accuracy to compensate for lost ground.
  • Par Golfers concentrate on course management, shot-making, and placement strategies.

To reduce their score, golfers should use clubs with higher lofts, take tips from low-handicap players, and practice short-game skills. Attitude is key in golf!

Mindset and Approach

A Winning Mindset for Golf

When playing golf, there are two mindsets. Par golf is where players aim to hit each hole with the allowed number of strokes. Bogey golf is where players aim to hit each hole better than a certain number of swings. A winning approach requires focus and knowing your capabilities.

For par or lower, golfers must focus on precision and perfect shots. Every hole presents an opportunity to excel and reach the ‘perfect score.’ For bogey golf, it is about hitting over par by just one shot per hole. Focus on avoiding foul shots, and don’t push yourself too hard.

Keep expectations realistic to improve your golf experience and take steps towards self-improvement. Control your swings. For instance, I played at Pinehurst Country Club for middle school championships. It was tough, and I knew bogeying most holes was inevitable. But when they turned out great, it felt even more rewarding!

Remember, the only way to improve your game is to play more or hire a swing coach.

Tips to Improve Your Golf Game

The following tips can be useful to enhance your golf skills and technique and improve your mental preparation and focus when playing. In this section of the article “Tips to Improve Your Golf Game,” we will dive deep into enhancing your overall golf skills and technique, improving your mental preparation, and focusing on the course. These areas can be further examined in the sub-sections “Enhancing Your Skills and Technique” and “Mental Preparation and Focus.”

Enhancing Your Skills and Technique

Golf proficiency and acumen can be improved with more than just practicing . To become a proficient golfer, use many techniques and methods to increase skills and style. Perfect form, greater flexibility, better grip technique with clubs, understanding the course’s terrain, and using strategic shot selection are all necessary steps to improve your golf game.

To develop your swing, make small changes to your approach over time. Use lower-intensity swings with increased speed and flexibility-enhancing exercises to prevent muscle injuries during play. Mastering grip technique is essential; fingers should be interlocked to create power by using grip pressure across both hands – firm but not too tight.

A change in stance with golf equipment can lead to lower scores . When trying to improve golfers’ shots, standing tall is the key. This will improve their day-to-day performance and provide long-term value gains. They will also have greater agility and leadership within their leagues.

Amateur golfers should switch from aiming directly at the hole to a more strategic approach. When selecting a club, analyze each hole’s layout and terrain, including roughs, bunkers, and slopes. Place more emphasis on accuracy rather than distance.

Byron Nelson had an unbeaten record of 11 victories after winning his first. His amazing run lasted seven months during the 1945 golf season. This inspires today’s pro-golfers who want to build momentum after their first win and become strong players on the golf circuit. Get your head in the game and avoid sending golf balls into the rough!

Mental Preparation and Focus

Boost mental strength and concentration for an efficient golf game! Prepare mentally with visualization exercises, breathing techniques, and positive self-talk . Focus on one shot at a time to avoid distractions. Utilize mindfulness techniques to pay attention to each moment. Create pre-shot routines for an optimal state of concentration.

Utilize the “ out-cue ” approach to reduce overthinking. Review scorecards with a positive mindset, and don’t dwell on past mistakes . Improve mental strength with regular meditation sessions.

Pro tip: Take your time on each shot to evaluate situations calmly and reduce pressure during gameplay. The right golfing style is the one that gets the ball in the hole without causing harm.

Final Thoughts on Bogey Golf and Par Golf

Golfing Styles – Which is Right for You?

Are you ready to take a swing at golf? There are two main styles: bogey and par . Knowing their differences will help you decide which is best for you.

Bogey golfers typically score one stroke above par per hole. This style requires a solid swing and the ability to bounce back from mistakes. Par golfers can hit par on each hole and have mastered several parts of the game.

Think about your skills, attitude, and goals when deciding. If you want an easy-going game, bogey golf may be for you. However, par golf could be the way to go if you aim to play at a higher level.

Remember, both styles take time and energy to master. Have fun, though! Golf isn’t just about scores – it’s about having a great time with friends or family in great places. Get started on your golf journey today!

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is bogey golf? A: Bogey golf refers to a golfer’s performance on a course where they consistently score one above par on every hole.

Q: What is par golf? A: Par golf refers to a golfer’s performance on a course where they consistently score at or below par on every hole.

Q: What is a par golfer? A: A par golfer is someone who consistently shoots even par or better on a course.

Q: What is a bogey in golf? A: A bogey in golf refers to a score of one over par on a particular hole.

Q: Is it better to shoot bogey golf or par golf? A: It is generally better to shoot par golf because it means you are consistently playing at or above the expected level of performance on each hole. However, bogey golf is still a respectable level of play for many golfers.

Q: What does “par” mean on a golf course? A: “Par” is a term used in golf to describe the number of strokes an expert golfer must take to complete a hole or a round. For example, a par 3 hole is typically expected to be finished in 3 strokes, while a par 4 hole is expected to be finished in 4 strokes.

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Golf Sidekick

Golf Scoring Terms and Meanings for Dummies

Last Updated on December 26, 2023 by Matt Greene

What is par?

Par is the standard that golfers try to achieve. It is important to note that par is a score which an  expert golfer  or  professional golfer would be expected to make on that individual hole. Most golfers expected score on a hole could be anywhere from 1 to 3 shots over par depending on their golfing ability and experience.

How does par work?

Every hole on a course is given its own par rating which is defined loosely by the length of an individual hole. Typically, longer holes require more shots to complete, therefore the par for these holes is greater in comparison to holes with fewer yards. 

Is par a good score?

If you're making pars on the golf course, you are playing to a high standard. Professional golfers will make mostly pars when playing a complete round. Recreational golfers making pars regularly should be proud. A scratch golfer would be considered to be playing to a par score regularly.

How many strokes to score a par?

Most golf courses will consist of par 3, par 4 and par 5 holes. On a par four for example, an expert golfer is expected to score four shorts: hit two shots to reach the green, then take two putts to get the ball into the hole.

A scorecard would read like this for 3 pars in a row:

what is par on the scorecard in golf

What is  par for 18 holes in golf?

Par over 18 holes is usually 72 strokes. Some course may be as much as par 74 or 73. There are executive courses which could be a lower par, from par 54 to par 69. Most professional level golf courses will have pars between 70 and 73.

What is  par for 9 holes?

Half a round is usually the 18 hole par divided by any random 9 holes could have a par anywhere between 27 and 38 .

What does par 72 mean?

Par 72 means that the 18 holes on that golf course should be playable by a scratch handicap in 72 strokes. 

Scoring relationship and par

If you have ever watched golf on the television, you will have heard the golf terms "level par", "even par", "under par" and "over par."

These are used to describe a player's scoring relationship relative to par. For example if a player plays the first hole of a golf course, (a par 4) in for shots, they would be level par or even par through one hole. If they then made a hole in one on the next par 3, (unlikely) they would be 2 under par.

Here's a link to more golfing terms .

What does under par mean in golf?

Under par means the golfer scores a number of strokes into the hole, less than the number stipulated on the scorecard. The names for these scores are birdie , eagle and albatross. 

On a par 4, that would be 3 or fewer strokes.

On a par 5, that would be 4 or fewer strokes.

On a par 3, that would be 2 or fewer strokes.

Over 9 holes, you can add up a score and be considered 'under par' if your total score is below the total number for par on that nine.

Over 18 holes, you add up your score and be considered 'under par' if your total score is below the total number for par on that course.

What is an eagle in golf?

Scoring an "eagle" means to get the ball in the hole in 2 strokes under par for that golf hole. It is a score which is usually made by expert or professional golfers.

How many shots do you need to score an eagle?

We know that an eagle corresponds to getting the ball into the hole in 2 under the par of that hole. Therefore to score an eagle, you would need to have the ball in the hole in:

One stroke on a par-3 hole

This is normally called a  hole in one  and is extremely rare! Pretty much a miracle golf shot. 

Two strokes on a par-4 hole is an eagle.

Usually a result of a holed approach shot or chip in. In golf terms this is still pretty rare but can happen on shorter holes. 

Three strokes on a par-5 hole is an eagle.

Most eagles are made this way. Hit the ball off the tee, second shot hits the putting green, hole the putt. 

What shape is used for an Eagle on a scorecard?

Two concentric circles are used to represent an eagle on a scorecard or a PGA Tour overlay.

eagle on a scorecard two concentric circles

Where does the term eagle come from?

The basis of the term eagle is linked with the other ornithological golfing term “ birdie .” An eagle is a big rare bird or "big birdie" and is thus considered to be less common and better version of a "birdie." It's one of many golfing terms which we need to learn. 

Golfer making a golf swing

What’s better than an eagle in golf?

A double-eagle or albatross is better than an eagle. So albatross or double-eagle is 3-under par. And it’s supposed to be an even more infrequent or rarer occurrence in the game of golf, hence even more celebratory.

What is a double-eagle?

A double eagle (also known as an albatross) is a score of 3-under par on the hole, which, only when possible, is done on a par-4 hole and a par-5 hole.

A par-4 double eagle would require a hole-in-one. Double eagle can be made on a par-5 if you hold your second shot.

What is a birdie in golf?

A player makes a birdie when he uses one fewer strokes than the par of the hole.

Let's break this down using an example from the golf course. We are on a par 4 hole. The aim here is to get the ball into the cup in 4 shots, to make par. If you manage to get the ball into the hole in 3 shots, this would be 1 under par for that hole and called a birdie. If you were on a par 5 hole and took 4 strokes to hole out, this would also be a birdie. 

What is double bogey in golf?

A Double Bogey is a golfing term that refers to a player scoring two strokes more than the  par of the particular hole that they are playing. It's one of the more common golf scoring terms and will be all too familiar to most recreational golfers!

Ideally, we want to avoid double bogey at all costs, but for most golfers it's an inevitable part of a round of golf. 

Here's a quick guide to make it super clear what scores make up a double bogey on holes with a different par rating:

  • A score of 5 is a double bogey in a par 3 hole
  • A score of 6 is a double bogey in a par 4 hole
  • A score of 7 is a double bogey in a par 5 hole

What shape is used for a double bogey?

On scorecards and on the overlays in the PGA Tour broadcasts, you'll see shapes around the numbers on the scoreboard. When you score a double bogey, you can draw a double square around the number to represent and make it easier to count the score up at the end. 

bogey par golf

Is a double bogey good?

If you're a total beginner golfer, double bogey is actually a good score on the golf course. As you get better, you will try to eliminate double bogey as a score. For professional golfers, scores of bogey or double bogey are pretty disastrous for their score.

What's worse than a double bogey?

A triple bogey or quadruple bogey is worse than a double bogey. While double bogey is two over regulation par for a scratch golfer, a triple bogey is 3 over par while a quadruple bogey is 4 over. No one wants these!

Does everyone make double bogeys?

The simple answer is, yes! Even the best golfers will make double bogeys and worse throughout their golfing life so don't be too hard on yourself when you inevitably make one. the best thing you can do is put a bad score behind you and move onto the next hole. Who knows, your next shot could be your best shot.

Double bogey golf handicap

If you make double bogey on every hole, your handicap will be around 30. Your score will be 108 shots or 36 over par on a par 72 course. 

Last Updated: Oct 31, 2023

Golf Terms: What is a Bogey in Golf?

A bogey in golf is a golf term to describe a score made on a golf hole where the golfer takes one stroke more than the designated par for the hole.

Written By: Zach Gollwitzer

Featured Image

Term Overview

A brief overview of the term including definition, usage, origins, helpful visuals.

A bogey in golf is a golf term to describe a score made on a golf hole where the golfer takes one stroke more than the designated par for the hole. This is often expressed as "one stroke over par" or more commonly, just "one over".

I made bogey on that hole.

Table of Contents

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New to golf and trying to figure out what all the golf scoring terms mean?

Let's talk about one of the most common golf scoring terms—the "bogey".

Definition of a "bogey" in golf

Article image

Here's how you'd hear this on a golf course:

Dang, I made another bogey
I made bogey on that hole

Here is how many shots it takes to make a bogey on each type of golf hole.

  • Par 5 hole - On a par 5, a bogey is equal to six strokes.
  • Par 4 hole - On a par 4, a bogey is equal to five strokes.
  • Par 3 hole - On a par 3, a bogey is equal to four strokes.

Origin of the term "bogey"

The emergence of the term "bogey" in golf has a fascinating backstory, rooted in military and colloquial language. Its beginnings trace back to World War I when British military pilots employed the term as slang to denote an unidentified or potentially hostile aircraft or target. This colloquialism evolved into a general reference for any unknown entity.

In the golfing realm, "bogey" found its place to signify a score that exceeded par by one stroke on a given hole. The connection lies in the concept of an "unknown" or "unidentified" score over par, reminiscent of its military slang origins. This unconventional score denotation was first recorded in 1890 in England, marking the inception of "bogey" in golfing discourse.

What is "the par" for a golf hole?

In golf, each individual golf hole has a designated "par" based on the hole's distance. This number assumes that a golfer will take two putts on the green, so in general...

  • If the green can be reached on your first shot, it will be a par 3 (1 stroke + 2 putts = 3)
  • If the green can be reached in 2 strokes, it is a par 4 (2 strokes + 2 putts = 4)
  • If the green can be reached in 3 strokes, it is a par 5 (3 strokes + 2 putts = 5).

These distances are different depending on what tee box you are playing from. Players who hit the golf ball shorter will play from the "forward tees" so they can reach the green in the designated number of strokes.

From the championship tees ("back tees") , here are some general distance estimates for each type of hole.

  • Par 3 - Generally, a par 3 is 100-180 yards from the championship tees.
  • Par 4 - Generally, a par 4 is 360-410 yards from the championship tees.
  • Par 5 - Generally, a par 5 is between 450-575 yards from the championship tees.

A golf course will add up all the "pars" for the holes to get the total course par. Generally, this will be either 70, 71, or 72. A golf course with a par of less than 70 are referred to as "Executive Course".

How do you write a bogey on a golf scorecard?

Golf Scorecard Symbols Graphic: What each Mark Means

On a golf scorecard, if you make a bogey, you will put a square around it to easily identify it.

As a side note, a double circle would be an eagle, a square is a bogey, and a double square is a double bogey. A par has no markings around it.

A real example of a bogey in golf

The easiest way to understand a bogey in golf is by example, so here is a video of me making a bogey in real life. As a scratch golfer, bogeys are generally a bad score for me, but for higher handicap golfers, bogeys are more common.

The hole I am playing is a par 4 hole , which means that a bogey is equal to 5 strokes.

In the video, notice how on my second shot, also called my "approach shot", I miss the green . For expert golfers, "missing the green in regulation" is generally when you will see bogeys happen. In this case, I "missed the green" and then failed to "get up and down". This just means that I was unable to make my putt after the chip shot, and therefore, I had a bogey putt and made bogey.

How common is a bogey for average golfers?

For the average golfer, a bogey is a very common score. Depending on your skill level, it can be a great score.

Most golfers shoot between 85-110. In this scoring range, a bogey is a good score.

As you improve your score to the range of 75-85, bogeys are okay , but you will generally not be happy with them.

And as you start shooting between 65-75, you will avoid bogeys at all costs. They are bad for your round.

How common is a bogey for a professional golfer?

Bogeys are very common for professional golfers, but you will rarely see the pros make more than one bogey in a row, and you will rarely see the pros have more than a handful of bogeys in a single round.

On tour, bogeys are bad.

Is a bogey a bad score for all golfers?

While tour players hate bogeys, a bogey is not always a bad score.

Even PGA Tour players can make a "good bogey".

Typically, a "good bogey" on tour would refer to a situation where the golfer has hit their tee shot into water or out of bounds and has to take a penalty stroke. At this point, it becomes near impossible to make a par, so the next best score the pro can shoot for is a bogey.

In these cases, a bogey would be a great score considering the circumstances. Oftentimes, after a pro hits it in the water and still manages to make a bogey, you might hear an announcer say, "well that was good damage control".

This just means, "it could have been a lot worse".

What is "bogey golf"?

A common phrase you might hear is "bogey golf", which refers to a golfer who is skilled, but not an expert.

Typically, a "bogey golfer" will shoot between 85 and 95 and will consider a bogey as a "good" score.

We call it "bogey golf" because rather than measuring yourself against the "par" of the course, you measure yourself against your ability to make bogeys.

In the USGA Handicap system, the "slope rating" is a measurement of how difficult a golf course will be for a "bogey golfer".

What comes after a bogey?

After a bogey is a double bogey, triple bogey, quadruple bogey, quintuple bogey, and... You get the idea.

Unlike scores below par that all have unique names (birdie, eagle, albatross, condor), subsequent scores above par are all types of bogeys.

Related golf terms to "bogey"

Golf Scoring Terms Infographic: Eagle, Birdie, Par, Bogey, and More

Below are other golf scoring terms related to a bogey in golf:

  • Hole-in-one - Also called an "ace", this is when you hit your tee shot in the hole and is most common on par 3s. On a par 3, a hole-in-one is also an "eagle". On a par 4, it is considered an "albatross" or "double eagle".
  • Condor - Also called a "triple eagle", this is the rarest golf score in golf because it requires you to get a hole-in-one on a par 5 hole. This has only happened a handful of times in history, and has never been caught on camera.
  • Albatross - Also called a "double eagle", an albatross is when you shoot 3 shots under the designated "par" for the hole. On a par 3, this is impossible to make. On a par 4, this is equivalent to a hole-in-one. On a par 5, this is when you hit your second shot in the hole.
  • Eagle - An eagle is when you shoot two shots under the designated "par" for the hole. On a par 3, this is equivalent to a hole-in-one. On a par 4, this is when you make a 2. On a par 5, this is when you make a 3.
  • Birdie - A birdie is when you shoot one shot under the designated "par" for the hole. On a par 3, this is equivalent to a 2. On a par 4, this is when you make a 3. On a par 5, this is when you make a 4.
  • Par - A par is when you take an equal number of strokes as designated by the "par" for the hole. On a par 3 this is a 3, par 4 a 4, and as you guessed, a par 5, this is a 5. This is often referred to as "even par", hence why you'll often see the symbol "E" as in the graphic above.
  • Double bogey - A double bogey is when you shoot 2 strokes over par for the hole. For example, on a par 3, this would be a score of 5.
  • Triple bogey (and worse) - A triple bogey (and worse) is when you take 3 strokes over par or more . For example, on a par 4, a score of 7 is a triple bogey, a score of 8 is a quadruple bogey, a score of 9 is a quintuple bogey, and so on.

Curious about other golf terms? Here is my Ultimate List of Golf Terms page that breaks down every golf term, slang, phrase, and lingo.

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What Is a Bogey? Definition of the Golf Score

Pros don't like bogeys, but it's a good score for recreational golfers

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"Bogey" is one of the scoring terms used by golfers and the term "bogey" means the golfer made a score of 1-over par on an individual golf hole.

Par , remember, is the expected number of strokes it should take an expert golfer to complete a hole . Golf holes are generally rated as par-3s, par-4s, and par-5s, which means that an expert golf should need three strokes, four strokes, and five strokes, respectively, to play those holes.

The Specific Scores That Result in a Bogey

How many strokes does it take to make a bogey? That is related the par of the hole being played. Here are the bogey scores for each respective par:

  • A score of 4 on a par-3 hole is a bogey;
  • A score of 5 on a par-4 hole is a bogey;
  • A score of 6 on a par-5 hole is a bogey.

Par-6 holes are uncommon, but golfers do occasionally encounter them. A bogey on a par-6 hole means the golfer used 7 strokes to play that hole.

Keep in mind that although bogey is a score that an expert golfer is usually disappointed with, very few of us are expert golfers ! Most recreational golfers aren't displeased when recording a bogey. Depending on your skill level, making a bogey might even be one of the highlights of your round.

Also, keep in mind that even for the very best golfers - those that play the professional tours - bogeys are not rare. Most professional golfers score one or two bogeys during a round. (It's just that they also make lots of pars and birdies to offset their occasional bogeys.)

In fact, you have to go all the way back to the 1974 Greater New Orleans Open to find a PGA Tour golfer who won a tournament without making a single bogey over the 72 holes of the event. That was Lee Trevino . (In 2016, Brian Stuard won the Zurich Classic of New Orleans — same tournament as Trevino! — without making a single bogey, but that event was shortened to 54 holes due to bad weather.)

How Did 'Bogey' Become a Golf Term?

Yes, the golf term "bogey" is related to the Bogey Man. And golfers definitely don't enjoy letting the Bogey Man get us!

But you might be surprised to learn that when bogey first entered the golf lexicon , in the 1890s, its meaning was different than the way we use it today. It was closer to the modern definition of "par" in meaning.

Other Forms and Uses of 'Bogey' in Golf

The term "bogey" shows up in several other golf terms. A bogey golfer is a golfer whose average score is about 1-over par per hole (e.g., a golfer who usually shoots around 90), but that term also has a specific meaning within the USGA Handicap System. "Bogey rating" is another handicap term and refers to an estimate of a golf course's degree of difficulty for "average golfers." That measurement is used by the USGA in its course rating system.

But the most common variations of "bogey" are found in additional scoring terms. Higher scores than 1-over par still incorporate the term bogey, but add a modifier. Here is how it works:

  • Bogey: 1-over par on a hole
  • Double bogey : 2-over par on a hole
  • Triple bogey : 3-over par on a hole
  • Quadruple bogey : 4-over par on a hole

And so on. Although when you start getting up into the quintuple and sextuple bogeys, it's probably best not to put a label on it.

A "bogey putt" is a putt that, if the golfer makes it, results in a score of bogey on the hole.

"Bogie" is a common misspelling of "bogey." Bogey used as a verb means to play the hole in 1-over par: "I need to bogey the final hole to finish under 90." The past tense is "bogeyed" (sometimes spelled "bogied"); the past participle is "bogeyed" and the gerund or present participle is "bogeying."

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What is a Bogey in Golf? Golfing Terms Explained for Everyone

The origin of many of golf terms stems from the early 1900s and provides for interesting reading with some amusing stories.

If you ask golfers what a bogey means, many will respond with the 1-over par explanation, but few will be able to explain the origins and how it relates to par.

Bogey, like so many other golfing terms, has 2 connotations dependent on the period in history and context that you refer to. To put the term in perspective, I will delve into the history which will hopefully clear up any misunderstanding.

What Exactly Is A Bogey?

The concept of bogey was invented in 1890 by Mr. Hugh Rotherham, then secretary of the Coventry Golf Club. The idea behind this was to set a standard score for good golfers on every hole. This was called the “ground score”.

Although the term “par” was also used at the time it referred to the ’perfect’ score on a hole. Par was a popular measurement in the US whereas bogey was trending in the UK.

Every golf club was left with the responsibility to assess and define bogey or ground score and the implementation varied between golf clubs.

As golfers improved in ability and equipment scores reduced and the better golfers would sometimes aim for par rather than bogey.

Par and bogey scores of each hole were often the same but sometimes the bogey score for the most difficult holes would be one over par hence the use of bogey in the modern context.

Some more traditional golf clubs still show the bogey score and a par score on their scorecard and there are still bogey competitions held regularly. Generally, the bogey score for a round will be approximately 5-6 shots higher than par.

When developing the frequently used Stableford scoring system, Dr. Frank Stableford points were awarded against bogey, not par. 2 points were awarded on a hole if you matched the bogey score under Dr. Stableford’s original system

The use of the term “par” dates back to the early 1900s. The length of the hole determined the par of each hole.

The USGA originally determined that each par designation would allow for 2 putts and the remainder of par is dependent on the number of shots required to get to the green. Par was calculated as

  • Holes up to 225 yards would be a par 3
  • Holes between 225 and 425 yards would be a par 4
  • Holes of 426 to 600 yards would be a par 5
  • Holes longer than 600 yards would be a par 6

What we have established by now is that the term bogey refers to 1 shot over par.

Where Does The Term “Bogey” Come From?

Some versions of the origin of the term “bogey “, indicate that it originated from Scotland although there are different versions of this.

  • One version credits Major Charles Wellman remarked that a player was “a regular Bogey man”
  • Another version ascribes the term to Scottish slang for goblins or devils.
  • Other versions suggest that the term is derived from an English dance hall song titled “The Bogey Man” which included the lyrics, “I’m the Bogey Man, catch me if you can.”
  • Yet another version suggests that includes the same song is that a certain Dr. Browne, Secretary of the Great Yarmouth Club, embraced the term and the club’s golfers agreed to the use of the term. It is said that during a competition Mr. CA Wellman bellowed to Dr. Browne that “This player of yours is a regular Bogey man”.

Now that we have attempted to determine where the bogey originated and who was possibly responsible for the common use of the term, let us look at the variations of the term for increments of over-par scores.

To record a bogey, you have to score 1 shot more than the regular par score set by the golf club for the specific hole.

  • On a par 3, a score of 4 will be called a bogey
  • On a par 4, a score of 5 will be called a bogey
  • On a par 5, a score of 6 will be called a bogey
  • On a par 6, a score of 7 will be called a bogey

Unlike scores below par having different avian terms, the bogey remains the only term used for scores over par.  Some golfers have tried to get the term “buzzard” accepted for a double bogey, but this has not become common use.

Scoring 2 over par is called a “double bogey”, 3 over par a triple bogey, 4 over par a quadruple bogey, 5 over par a quintuple bogey, and higher scores, which you are unlikely to score, follows the trend.

Professional golfers are often frustrated when scoring a bogey but the average golfer with a handicap between 16 and 20 is expected to score a bogey on every hole.

The USPGA sets the average golf handicap at 15. These golfers are often called “bogey golfers”. Since most golfers can score par on some holes it is common to see some double or triple bogeys on the card at the end of the round.

In Conclusion

I hope that this article shed some light on where the bogey originated and how it became a 1 over par score as it is used to today.

To do a more in-depth investigation into the history and terms used in golf with all the quirks associated with it, you can find more information in Robert Browning’s History of Golf 1955 .

Enjoy your next round and leave the doubles and triples for later when you drown our sorrows or celebrate your excellent round on the 19 th hole.

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Par/bogey format.

A par competition ( par / bogey competition) is a form of Stroke Play where the scoring is made as in 18- hole Match Play . The golfer plays a match against par on every hole (a virtual scratch golfer who plays pars at all holes). The opponent is the player’s potential and there are only three outcomes for each hole : Win, Halve or Loss. The points are awarded in relation to the par (or bogey ) at each hole as follows:

stableford points, par bogey points, par/bogey

The table shows a comparison of points scored in the Par / Bogey format with Stableford scoring .

A bogey competition is the variation of the classic par competition. The only difference is that the golfer plays against “ bogey ” on every hole . In this competition “ bogey ” does not necessarily mean one over par and its value is determined by Committee for each hole . It is normally the same as the par score, occasionally it is a shot higher. Some more traditional clubs have par and bogey scores for each hole on their scorecards.

Points in these formats can be counted in relation to the net par value or the gross par value. In handicap competitions ( net score ) players have to know and allocate their handicap strokes to each hole .  Net score page shows more information about the allocation of handicap strokes.

The side  with the highest total number of points scored on all holes wins.

See simple Stroke Play and Par/Bogey Competition score calculator here.

The complete, universal stroke play scorecard (including Par/Bogey scoring)

that calculates the net Stroke Play and Par / Bogey score of the entire round of golf.

Menu path: Golf » Scoring » Stroke Play » Par/Bogey Format

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Korn Ferry Tour

Jeremy Paul holds off late rallies, wins The Bahamas Great Exuma Classic at Sandals Emerald Bay

Daily Wrap Up

Jeremy Paul during the final round of the The Bahamas Great Exuma Classic. (Mike Mulholland/Getty Images)

Jeremy Paul during the final round of the The Bahamas Great Exuma Classic. (Mike Mulholland/Getty Images)

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GREAT EXUMA, The Bahamas – With back-to-back bogey-free 5-under 67s in the third and final rounds, Jeremy Paul held off Class of 2022 Korn Ferry Tour graduate Kevin Roy and 2023 NCAA Championship runner-up Ross Steelman Wednesday evening, as the 29-year-old German earned his first career Korn Ferry Tour win at The Bahamas Great Exuma Classic at Sandals Emerald Bay.

Paul entered 2024 with fully exempt status from a No. 56 finish on the 2023 Korn Ferry Tour Points List, his second consecutive top 75 finish. A victory, though, eluded him, with Paul’s best finish being a T3 at the 2022 Ascendant presented by Blue, roughly a 45-minute drive from his alma mater, University of Colorado.

Now in his fourth season as a Korn Ferry Tour member, his season-opening victory positions Paul for his strongest run at a PGA TOUR card to this point in his career.

“I’m super happy I was able to pull it off. It’s never easy playing with a lead,” Paul said. “Kevin (Roy) was making a lot of birdies down the stretch, so he made me work for it. I’m just super thrilled right now with all the work I’ve put in for so many years, and all the people who believe in me along the way that I can give back a little bit with this win.”

Paul shared the 54-hole lead with Roy, but after the first three holes of the final round, the latter found himself three strokes off the lead.

As Roy opened with a birdie, bogey and par, Paul made three consecutive birdies and added a fourth birdie at the par-5 ninth. Although Roy played a flawless back nine, including birdies on each of the final three holes, Paul maintained a clean scorecard with eight pars and what turned out to be the tournament-winning birdie at the par-5 15th.

Paul played the final 43 holes without a bogey, enabling him to finish one stroke ahead of Roy, and two strokes ahead of Steelman, who closed in a 9-under 63 and tied the event’s 18-hole scoring record. Paul joined PGA TOUR winners Akshay Bhatia (2022) and Sungjae Im (2018) as the only winners of The Bahamas Great Exuma Classic at Sandals Emerald Bay who carded a bogey-free final round.

Paul’s winning total – 17-under 271 – ranked second in tournament history, only behind Zecheng Dou’s 18-under 270 in 2019.

Golf, as it turned out, was the easy part. Going to sleep as the 54-hole co-leader, however, was quite the challenge.

“I didn’t sleep too well, honestly,” Paul said. “When you’re alone in your room and with your thoughts, that’s always the worst place. Once I got on the golf course, I honestly felt pretty comfortable. I knew I was hitting the ball really well, and it was all about not getting ahead. I think that was actually a benefit this course is very challenging (because) I was able to stay in the moment.

“The most nerve wracking was the first tee shot, just because it’s an uncomfortable tee shot,” said Paul, who began working with a mental coach last season. “Once you get that tee shot in play, and I got off to a birdie start, it calmed me down a little bit."

Paul’s journey to the Korn Ferry Tour began in the early 2010s, when he left Germany (he plays from Heidelberg) to play at Colorado.

Late in the fall semester of his senior season in Boulder, Paul played his way through the 2016 Korn Ferry Tour Qualifying Tournament (now PGA TOUR Q-School presented by Korn Ferry) as an amateur. A T72 finish at Final Stage left him with conditional status and an uphill climb to Korn Ferry Tour starts in 2017, so Paul remained an amateur and on the golf team at Colorado.

Paul turned professional in April 2017 and accepted two sponsor exemptions, but missed cuts in both starts left him buried on the priority ranking. At the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas Wichita Open Benefitting KU Wichita Pediatrics in June, Paul finished T27 as a sponsor exemption, just enough to climb the priority ranking via the reshuffle and make nine more starts. By the end of the season, Paul had just four made cuts in 12 starts and stood 200th on the money list.

It was back to square one.

After three seasons on PGA TOUR Canada, Paul regained Korn Ferry Tour membership with a No. 10 finish on the circuit’s 2021 Order of Merit. A T11 finish at Final Stage of 2021 Q-School set Paul up for guaranteed starts and a successful 2022 season on the Korn Ferry Tour, which concluded with him at No. 37 on the Points List.

Last season may have been a statistical regression (one top-10 compared to three in 2022, 12 missed cuts in 2023 compared to just nine the year before), but Paul’s confidence hardly wavered. With plenty of encouragement from his twin brother, Yannik, a DP World Tour winner and top 150 player in the Official World Golf Ranking, Jeremy stayed the course and remained patient as the 2024 season came into focus.

“I knew I was putting in a lot of good work at home,” Paul said. “I knew my brother was doing good and our games are very similar, so I knew if he was able to have the success he’s having in Europe, there’s no reason why I can’t have success over here as well. Sometimes you’ve got to keep believing, and sometimes the route’s a little longer, but with him playing so well and us being able to practice together all the time, that really helped me, because I feel like my game’s there.

“It’s obviously a long season… a win sets up really well to fulfill a dream of mine to become a PGA TOUR member at the end of the season.”

Final-Round Notes

  • Class of 2022 Korn Ferry Tour graduate Kevin Roy (2nd/-16) matched his career-high finish in his 80th career start on the Korn Ferry Tour (2nd/2022 Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Kansas Wichita Open); his 16-under 272 tied the lowest 72-hole score by a runner-up at The Bahamas Great Exuma Classic at Sandals Emerald Bay (2019/Ben Kohles and Steve LeBrun)
  • Ross Steelman (3rd/-15), who made eight starts last season after he earned and accepted Korn Ferry Tour membership with a No. 4 finish in the 2023 PGA TOUR University Ranking, tied the 18-hole tournament scoring record with a final-round 9-under 63 featuring an eagle at the par-5 first, eight birdies and a bogey at the par-4 10th
  • Steelman’s final-round 63 tied John Oda (2019/R1) for the lowest round in tournament history
  • Steelman had just one top-25 in 11 starts across the Korn Ferry Tour (eight) and PGA TOUR (three) after he turned professional following a runner-up finish at the 2023 NCAA Championship last May (T25/2023 Utah Championship presented by Zions Bank); he finished T28 at Final Stage of 2023 PGA TOUR Q-School presented by Korn Ferry for guaranteed starts in the first 12 events this season
  • Cristobal Del Solar (4th/-13), who finished No. 52 on the 2023 Korn Ferry Tour Points List with four top-10s as a rookie, posted a career-high finish in his 26th start on Tour (previous: 5th/2023 NV5 Invitational presented by Old National Bank)
  • Class of 2022 Korn Ferry Tour graduate and United States Air Force veteran Kyle Westmoreland (5th/-12) matched his career-high finish on Tour in his 37th career start (5th/2023 UNC Health Championship presented by STITCH)
  • Second-year member Mason Andersen (T7/-10), who finished No. 36 on the 2023 Korn Ferry Tour Points List, recorded his third top-10 in his last four starts (T2/2023 Simmons Bank Open for the Snedeker Foundation; T18/2023 Nationwide Children’s Hospital Championship; T10/2023 Korn Ferry Tour Championship presented by United Leasing & Finance)
  • Noah Goodwin (T7/-10), who finished No. 110 on the 2023 Korn Ferry Tour Points List as a rookie and regained membership with a T14 at Final Stage of 2023 PGA TOUR Q-School presented by Korn Ferry, carded nine birdies in a final-round 6-under 66 for his second career top-10 on Tour (T4/2023 Compliance Solutions Championship)
  • Fred Biondi (T7/-10), the individual medalist at the 2023 NCAA Championship, posted his highest finish in 10 career Korn Ferry Tour starts (previous: T31/2023 BMW Charity Pro-Am); he earned and accepted Korn Ferry Tour membership last June following the 2023 NCAA Championship
  • Rookie Austin Hitt (T11/-9), who earned membership for the first time with a No. 4 finish in the 2023 PGA TOUR Latinoamérica Totalplay Cup standings, closed with bogey-free 6-under 66 in his second career Korn Ferry Tour start (2023 Price Cutter Charity Championship/T44)
  • Harry Higgs (T14/-8) led the field with 24 total birdies for the week, including a field-leading 10 birdies as part of a final-round 8-under 64
  • Korn Ferry Tour winner and five-time FedExCup Playoffs qualifier Bud Cauley (T21/-7) completed his first PGA TOUR-sanctioned start since the 2020 Fortinet Championship/T14 with a final-round 4-under 68

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Rory McIlroy leads DP World Tour’s Dubai Invitational despite quadruple bogey

Rory McIlroy continues to play well in Dubai, although a pair of swings almost knocked him off course.

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Rory McIlroy, Dubai Invitational

Rory McIlroy has played spectacularly for 35 of the 36 holes thus far at the Dubai Invitational .

He leads by two shots over Yannik Paul of Germany and Denmark’s Jeff Winther after carding a 1-under 70 on Friday, but his round included a quadruple bogey at the par-3 8th.

“I think if I look at the other 17 holes that I played, I played very, very well again. Hit some good iron shots,” McIlroy said of his Friday round.

“Played not too dissimilarly to the way I played [Thursday]... But the conditions were getting a little trickier. The wind was up. The greens were firm, and I had a couple of miscues on the 8th hole. I felt like I did well to get my head back into it and play some solid golf on the way in, and everyone seemed to find it a little more difficult today than yesterday. So it’s nice to go into the weekend with the lead.”

McIlroy rifled not one but two tee balls into the water to the left of the green at the 214-yard 8th hole. His fifth shot finally found the putting surface, but he could not make the 13-footer for a triple bogey.

Making a quadruple bogey, McIlroy dropped from 11-under to 7-under just like that.

Rory McIlroy, DP World Tour, Dubai Invitational

But the Northern Irishman quickly put his mishaps behind him. After missing an 11-footer for birdie on the 9th hole, McIlroy made birdie at the par-5 10th.

“Ten was big. I had a chance to bounce back on nine that I missed but 10 was big.” McIlroy noted.

Three holes later, on the par-5 13th, McIlroy drove the green in two, thus setting up another birdie. The 13th at Dubai Creek features an island green, thus requiring two accurate shots to get home in two. McIlroy avoided the water as he continued to recover from his troubles at the 8th.

He then made one more birdie on the par-3 16th, thus giving him five total on the day to go along with his quad at the 8th.

The day before, the four-time major champion carded a bogey-free 9-under 62.

McIlroy sits at 10-under for the tournament and will begin his third round on Saturday at 1:39 a.m. ET. Golf Channel will begin coverage at 2:30 a.m. ET.

Jack Milko is a golf staff writer for SB Nation’s Playing Through. Be sure to check out @_PlayingThrough for more golf coverage. You can follow him on Twitter @jack_milko as well.

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McIlroy and Harman finish poorly to fall away from leaders on Day 1 of Dubai Desert Classic

Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland reacts on 11th hole during the first round of the Hero Dubai Desert Classic golf tournament, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Thursday, Jan. 18, 2024. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland plays his second shot on 13th hole during the first round of the Hero Dubai Desert Classic golf tournament in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Thursday, Jan. 18, 2024. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland plays a bunker shot on 10th hole during the first round of the Hero Dubai Desert Classic golf tournament, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Thursday, Jan. 18, 2024. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Brian Harman of the U.S. plays his second shot on 10th hole during the first round of the Hero Dubai Desert Classic golf tournament, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Thursday, Jan. 18, 2024. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Alex Fitzpatrick of England plays his second shot on 13th hole during the first round of the Hero Dubai Desert Classic golf tournament in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Thursday, Jan. 18, 2024. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Francesco Molinari of Italy plays his second shot on 13th hole during the first round of the Hero Dubai Desert Classic golf tournament in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Thursday, Jan. 18, 2024. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Adam Scott of Australia tees off on 11th hole during the first round of the Hero Dubai Desert Classic golf tournament, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Thursday, Jan. 18, 2024. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

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DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Rory McIlroy and Brian Harman were cruising in the first round of the Dubai Desert Classic.

Then they came to their final stretch of holes.

McIlroy bogeyed three of his last four to shoot 1-under 71 Thursday and Harman, the British Open champion who also started at No. 10, finished bogey-par-double to close on the same score.

They were four strokes off the clubhouse lead held by Li Haotong of China midway through Day 1 of one of the marquee events of the season on the European tour.

Scottie Scheffler acknowledges the gallery on the 10th green during the third round of The Sentry golf event, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2024, at Kapalua Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Matt York)

McIlroy, a three-time winner of the tournament, birdied five of his first 11 holes to be on the leaderboard at 4 under before he hit problems in the tough final holes of the front nine.

At No. 6, he missed a par putt from inside 4 feet. At No. 7, he duffed his chip from just off the green and couldn’t save par from 30 feet.

He completed a hat trick of bogeys when he missed the eighth green from the middle of the fairway, was short again with his chip from the rough and missed a par putt from 10 feet.

Even No. 9, his final hole, involved some slight trauma. McIlroy drove into a bunker then left himself an up-and-down from 21 yards, which he just about made when his par putt squeezed into the right of the cup, prompting a sigh of relief from the four-time major champion.

Harman’s round was damaged by a 6 on the par-4 9th that came after he hit his second shot out of the trees and into the water running down the left of the hole. The American had been on 4 under after 12 holes.

Harman is playing in his first European tour event not co-sanctioned with the PGA Tour, with his victory at the Open in Hoylake giving him more freedom on his schedule to play overseas.

Li, the Dubai Desert Classic champion in 2018 when he held off McIlroy down the stretch, birdied his last hole to shoot 67 and break free from a group on 4 under, continuing his career rebound after finishing last year with 14 missed cuts and two withdrawals in his last 16 events.

“Yeah, it happens. Just golf,” he said of his form in 2023. “I don’t know — hopefully doesn’t happen again.”

Li tied for 14th last week at the Dubai Invitational, the first event in 2024.

Adrian Meronk, Nicolai Hojgaard, Richard Mansell and Soren Kjeldsen were tied for second place on 4 under.

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Dubai Desert Classic: Rory McIlroy blows strong start as Haotong Li takes first-round lead on DP World Tour

Rory McIlroy bogeyed three of his last four holes in his opening round at the Dubai Desert Classic to give up a strong position; Haotong Li claimed the first-round lead with a five-under par 67; watch the second round live on Sky Sports Golf from 4am on Friday

Thursday 18 January 2024 12:22, UK

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Rory

Rory McIlroy blew a strong start at the Dubai Desert Classic to finish the opening round four shots back from leader Haotong Li.

McIlroy bogeyed three of his last four holes at Emirates Golf Club to shoot a one-under 71 on Thursday at one of the marquee events of the season on the European tour.

Open champion Brian Harman, who like McIlroy started from the 10th hole, finished bogey-par-double to close on the same score as the Northern Irishman.

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England's Richard Mansell finished in a five-way tie for for second place on four-under alongside Adrian Meronk, Nicolai Hojgaard, Soren Kjeldsen and Sebastian Garcia.

McIlroy, a three-time winner of the tournament, birdied five of his first 11 holes to be on the leaderboard at four-under before he hit problems in the tough final holes of the front nine.

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Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland reacts on 11th hole during the first round of the Hero Dubai Desert Classic golf tournament, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Thursday, Jan. 18, 2024. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

At the sixth, he missed a par putt from inside four feet. At the seventh, he duffed his chip from just off the green and couldn't save par from 30 feet.

He completed a hat-trick of bogeys when he missed the eighth green from the middle of the fairway, was short again with his chip from the rough and missed a par putt from 10 feet.

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Even the ninth, his final hole, involved some slight trauma. McIlroy drove into a bunker then left himself an up-and-down from 21 yards, which he just about made when his par putt squeezed into the right of the cup, prompting a sigh of relief from the four-time major champion.

Harman's round was damaged by a six on the par-four 9th that came after he hit his second shot out of the trees and into the water running down the left of the hole. The American had been on four-under after 12 holes.

bogey par golf

Harman is playing in his first European tour event not co-sanctioned with the PGA Tour, with his victory at the Open in Hoylake giving him more freedom on his schedule to play overseas.

Li, the Dubai Desert Classic champion in 2018 when he held off McIlroy down the stretch, birdied his last hole to shoot 67 and break free from a group on four-under, continuing his career rebound after finishing last year with 14 missed cuts and two withdrawals in his last 16 events.

"Yeah, it happens. Just golf," he said of his form in 2023. "I don't know - hopefully doesn't happen again."

Li tied for 14th last week at the Dubai Invitational, the first event in 2024.

Tommy Fleetwood, who edged out McIlroy for victory at last week's Dubai Invitational, also finished on one-under, while European Ryder Cup captain Luke Donald is in T19 on two-under.

Watch the Dubai Desert Classic live on Sky Sports Golf from Thursday through to Sunday. Coverage of day two begins at 4am on Friday. Stream golf and more top sport with NOW.

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IMAGES

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COMMENTS

  1. Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and More)

    MyGolfSpy and TheGrint (a Golf GPS and Golf Handicapping App) analyzed how often users of TheGrint made par, birdie or better, bogey, double bogey, and triple bogey or worse.

  2. Par Bogey: What are the rules of this unusual golf format?

    Oct 31, 2022 Is it stroke play or is it match play? Our Rules of Golf expert reveals everything you need to know A stroke play format which uses match play scoring? Welcome to Par Bogey - a game that can be played off scratch, with handicaps, and also in fourballs, foursomes, and team competitions.

  3. Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross

    Hush! Here Comes the Bogey Man", which was popular at that time. So at Yarmouth and elsewhere the ground score became known as the bogey score. A 'bogle' was a Scottish goblin as far back as the 16th Century and a Bogey-man was a widely used term for a goblin or devil.

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    Brent Kelley Updated on 05/24/19 Chris Sattlberger/Blend Images/Getty Images So you're new to the game of golf and you keep hearing references to birdies and bogeys, eagles and pars. What are those things, anyway? What do those golf scoring terms mean ? Those (and other terms) are all names for different types of scores on an individual golf hole.

  5. Par (golf scoring format)

    Par, or bogey, is a scoring system used mostly in amateur and club golf.

  6. What Are Bogey Competitions In Golf?

    The Game What Are Bogey Competitions In Golf? Bogey competitions, which date from 1891, are a way of playing matchplay against the course Sign up to Golf Monthly Newsletter One of the advantages of bogey competitions is that you can simply abandon a hole when the going gets too rough (Image credit: Getty Images) By Roderick Easdale

  7. Golf Rule 32, Bogey Par And Stableford Competitions

    Simplified Rules USGA Rules Golf Rule 32, Bogey, Par and Stableford Competitions - Simplified Version Note: Bogey, par and Stableford are competitions played under the stroke play format, with each player competing against a fixed score for each hole. The player with the most "wins" during the competition is the winner, as in match play.

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    Glossary By NCG info Aug 5, 2022 What is Bogey Golf and how do you play it? Here's what you need to know about this fun golf format Golf, a sport of precision and strategy, has given rise to numerous formats and terminologies that both intrigue and challenge enthusiasts.

  10. Par (score)

    Course and tournament scores A golfer's score is compared with the par score. [4] If a course has a par of 72 and a golfer takes 75 strokes to complete the course, the reported score is +3, or "three-over-par" and takes three shots more than par to complete the course. If a golfer takes 70 strokes, the reported score is −2, or "two-under-par".

  11. Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Eagle, Birdie, Albatross, and More

    Golf, a sport that melds skill, strategy, and a touch of finesse, comes with its own rich vocabulary of Golf scoring terms.From the familiar Stroke to the elusive Condor, each term encapsulates a moment on the course, a stroke of the club that defines a golfer's journey.Let's unravel the language of golf scoring and explore the nuances of Stroke, Par, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and more.

  12. What Is A Bogey In Golf?

    From $9.47 Trending Nike Golf Announces Newest Signing After Tiger Woods Split TaylorMade Qi10 vs Stealth 2 Fleetwood Wins Dubai Invitational By One After McIlroy Errors The Often Overlooked Area Of Your Golf Game When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Here's how it works. Features The Game Features

  13. Golf Scoring Term: Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle and More

    Bogey: A bogey is a single stroke above par. So if a golfer takes 5 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a bogey. Double Bogey: A double bogey is two strokes above par. So if a golfer takes 6 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a double bogey.

  14. Golf Scoring Terms: Meanings of Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle

    Par is the number of strokes that an expert golfer is expected to take on a hole. A birdie is one stroke under par, an eagle is two strokes under par, a double bogey is two strokes over par, and a triple bogey is three strokes over par. Understanding Par. Understanding "par" in golf is like grasping the rules of the road when learning to drive.

  15. What Is A Bogey In Golf (And Double Bogey) • Honest Golfers

    By Kolter Knutson Updated on November 2, 2023 "You made a bogey there," you might hear your golf buddies say. Of course, you laugh along and continue playing. But in the back of your mind, you have a question you don't want to ask them. What in the world is a bogey in golf terminology? A bogey in golf is a term for going over par by one shot.

  16. Bogey Golf VS Par Golf: Understanding The Difference

    Bogey golf is a term used in golfing to describe a score of one over par on a hole. It means the golfer took one more shot than expected. For example, on a par 4 hole, a score of 5 would be a bogey. This may sound negative, but it's an improvement from double bogeys or worse for beginners and amateurs.

  17. Golf Scoring Terms and Meanings for Dummies

    The names for these scores are birdie, eagle and albatross. On a par 4, that would be 3 or fewer strokes. On a par 5, that would be 4 or fewer strokes. On a par 3, that would be 2 or fewer strokes. Over 9 holes, you can add up a score and be considered 'under par' if your total score is below the total number for par on that nine.

  18. Golf Terms: What is a Bogey in Golf?

    Par 4 hole - On a par 4, a bogey is equal to five strokes. Par 3 hole - On a par 3, a bogey is equal to four strokes. Origin of the term "bogey" The emergence of the term "bogey" in golf has a fascinating backstory, rooted in military and colloquial language.

  19. Golf: Birdie, Par & Bogey

    Golf: Birdie, Par & Bogey. Part of the series: Golf Terms. The terms birdie, par and bogey are used to describe your golf score in relation to par. Learn mor...

  20. The Bogey in Golf Definition and Examples of Scores

    The term "bogey" shows up in several other golf terms. A bogey golfer is a golfer whose average score is about 1-over par per hole (e.g., a golfer who usually shoots around 90), but that term also has a specific meaning within the USGA Handicap System. "Bogey rating" is another handicap term and refers to an estimate of a golf course's degree ...

  21. What is a Bogey in Golf? Golfing Terms Explained for Everyone

    To record a bogey, you have to score 1 shot more than the regular par score set by the golf club for the specific hole. On a par 3, a score of 4 will be called a bogey. On a par 4, a score of 5 will be called a bogey. On a par 5, a score of 6 will be called a bogey. On a par 6, a score of 7 will be called a bogey.

  22. Par/Bogey Competition in golf

    Description of Par/Bogey scoring in golf. A Par Competition is a form of Stroke Play where the scoring is made as in 18-hole Match Play

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    He then made one more birdie on the par-3 16th, thus giving him five total on the day to go along with his quad at the 8th. The day before, the four-time major champion carded a bogey-free 9-under 62.

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    McIlroy bogeyed three of his last four to shoot 1-under 71 Thursday and Harman, the British Open champion who also started at No. 10, finished bogey-par-double to close on the same score. They were four strokes off the clubhouse lead held by Li Haotong of China midway through Day 1 of one of the marquee events of the season on the European tour.

  26. Dubai Desert Classic: Rory McIlroy blows strong start as Haotong Li

    Rory McIlroy bogeyed three of his last four holes in his opening round at the Dubai Desert Classic to give up a strong position; Haotong Li claimed the first-round lead with a five-under par 67 ...

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    Level 1: Hit one easy fairway chip or putt to within 20 feet from hole. Level 2: Hit one tight lie fairway chip to within 30 yards of the hole. Level 3: Hit one fairway chip or pitch over a hill ...

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    Rory McIlroy overcame windy conditions and a quadruple bogey to get to 12 under par and hold his two-shot lead heading into the weekend at the Dubai Invitational.. The No. 2-ranked player in the ...