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Handicap Rating Rule Options for 2022

  • By Gary Jobson
  • February 8, 2022

Helly Hansen NOOD St. Petersburg

The day was perfect for ­racing. With the wind out of the south at 15 knots, there was a spirited group of sailors striving to get their yachts to the finish line without leaving a second to spare on the racecourse. The course was a standard windward-leeward configuration, with 1.6-mile legs. After a below-average finish in the first race, our crew refocused and sailed exceptionally well for the next five races, achieving great starts, sailing on every favorable wind shift, and executing our boat handling with deft precision. We were doing everything we possibly could to ensure a corrected-time win.

But then, to our dismay, we watched our rivals round the final weather mark from well behind, set their spinnakers and jump on plane, cruising through our lee and sailing away, ­easily saving their time allowances and beating us on corrected time. Afterward, we analyzed every detail of every race, searching for ways to save even more time. Maybe we could have gained 20 seconds, but it never added up enough to make a difference. Eventually, it became clear to me that the handicap rating rule wasn’t working properly—certainly not for us, nor many other owners and teams that are becoming disheartened with the state of big-boat handicap ­racing.

This is, of course, not a new problem. The quest to assign fair handicap ratings to yachts of different shapes and sizes has been a challenge for more than a century. Looking back, a pattern seems to repeat every 20 years or so: A new rule emerges, designers and owners attempt to exploit every conceivable loophole, and inevitably the fleet dwindles as sailors become dissatisfied with the rule and walk away.

Big-boat handicap racing in North America is at a turning point once again. During my tenure at World Sailing , I was liaison to the Offshore and Oceanic Committee and the Offshore Racing Council. At US Sailing, I pushed the organization to improve its offshore regulatory operations. My perspectives, as a competitor and a board member, have always been aligned. In the United States, there is general dissatisfaction with our handicap rating rules, but what I have learned from current leaders about this situation is that help—and change—is on the way. To be successful, bold steps are in order.

Now, however, is not the time to create a new handicap rating rule. All the experts I’ve spoken to agree the preferred action is to improve the entry-level Performance Handicap Rating Factor system and work with the Offshore Racing Council, which manages ORC, to improve its rule for North American racing sailors. Creating a new handicap rule is an arduous process, and success is not a sure thing. There are many lessons from the past: In 1965, the Cruising Club of America and the Royal Ocean Racing Club collaborated on a new handicap rule for use in the Olympic Games. The Offshore Racing Council was formed to administer the new International Offshore Rule in 1969.

IOR was a vibrant rule because it was universally accepted and used internationally. In time, however, favor in IOR started to fade. Stan Honey, an authority on offshore racing and handicap systems, says American sailors became frustrated with the ORC in the 1980s for not fixing known problems with IOR. “ORC did not have the strength of character to maintain the IOR rule,” Honey says. “The technical committee was comprised of designers that had their own boats in build, so those guys didn’t want to change the rule to fix the problems.”

The IOR’s problem children—yachts with pinched ends—eventually killed the rule.

“The IOR would still be working if the ORC had fixed it,” Honey says, “but they didn’t. The boats got weird, and nobody liked them anymore.”

US yachtsmen then went and funded the development of the H. Irving Pratt Project and created a velocity prediction program (VPP) that became the Measurement Handicap Rule. The Pratt VPP is still the basis for handicapping rules in use today. The ORC used the basics of the MHS rule and created the International Measurement System, and soon enough, the same problems surfaced again.

“The ORC screwed it up again because it did not maintain it even though there was some great racing with the IMS rule,” Honey says. “When the loopholes got figured out, the technical committee did not fix the problems. So, the United States split off again, ­creating the Americap Rule and the Offshore Rating Rule.”

Today, several handicap ­rating rules are used in North America, including ORR, ORC, IRC (which is owned by the Royal Ocean Racing Club) and PHRF. That’s too many, and none are perfect.

Ed Cesare, chairman of New York YC’s Handicap Rating Rule and Measurement Committee, says the club used ORC broadly last summer for the first time and experienced a high level of disappointment from the fleet. “We received complaints about the quality and integrity of the certificates,” he says. “I am not at all comfortable that we are going to get to a good place with the ORC rule. They did a good job on marketing it, which led to unrealistic expectations about what the rule can do.”

Cesare and Larry Fox, representing the Storm Trysail Club, presented seven submissions via US Sailing to the ORC. The submissions asked to expand the wind range down to 4 knots; define the allowable use of unusual headsails (Code Zeros); and improve the way the VPP handles planing boats, adding more wind ranges from three groups to five. They also asked stability calculation questions, including a request to allow multiple standard ORC certificates at once for the same boat, and a request to examine the rated performance of unique boat types.

“All of [the submissions] were remanded to the technical ­committee,” he says.

The ORC’s response was the same when the United States was complaining about IOR and IMS in the 1980s and 1990s, Honey says. “It does not end well when you take that approach with American sailors.”

The ORC, he adds, needs to aggressively work to solve the problems and come up with a better rule, or at least a version of the rule that meets the needs of US sailors. “For 2022, the five wind-band scoring will help,” he says. “We think this will ameliorate the displacement-planing situation. It is in progress, and I hope the ORC will work with us.”

The United States has the third-highest number of ORC International certificates, so Cesare says his group will take action by putting yachts in appropriate classes. “The class breaks are going to be draconian,” he says. “If you have a 40-foot planing boat, you better get some of your friends to come or you are going to be ­racing by yourself.”

Dobbs Davis, chair of the ORC Promotion and Development Committee, has been championing the rule for many years. He is, of course, an enthusiastic supporter of the rule and says it works if the scoring is done properly. “Using ORC tools, we have multiple ways of scoring,” Davis says. “One of them is the wind triple-number system—low, medium and high [wind strength]. There are crossovers, which puts a burden on the race committee because they have to decide what is the low, medium or heavy wind. Basically, below 8 knots is low, 9 to 14 knots is medium, and above 14 knots is high.”

As far as dealing with the concerns of Cesare and Fox, Davis says the scoring works fine with planing boats—again, as long as the scoring is done properly. As to US Sailing’s other submissions, Davis says, race committees do need to establish accurate wind strengths to score boats correctly, but this is not easy. Some race committees will determine the wind strength before the race starts, and scoring with five wind ranges will make it worse. The ORC will not allow boats to have multiple certificates, he adds, “which would make it tough on our administrators. The ORC will not make estimates on stability. This is a safety issue.”

Matt Gallagher, an ORC member, past chair of the Chicago YC’s Race to Mackinac, and chair of US Sailing’s Offshore Racing Committee, says he’s committed to achieving two goals: “We want our members and racers to go offshore and do it with any rating rule our partner clubs choose to use, and then bring some stability to the rating rules and bring some focus back to PHRF. The base of the pyramid has been neglected for a while. We have to start growing that again.”

Gallagher is optimistic about the use of the ORC rule and says it’s one that needs attention and tweaking to make it more appropriate for the United States. “[The ORC is] going to have to pay more attention to us.”

Honey agrees: “PHRF should be cheap, cheerful and simple scoring,” he says. “People should understand that the most effective rating for their boat is in class scoring. Anything that changes a boat out of class scoring is going to be punished [with a higher handicap rating]. If you want to spend more money to perform better, put your money in new sails, coaches, a smooth bottom and stuff like that.”

As for the future, Honey has an interesting prediction: “A new rule will happen. The original VPP that came out of the Pratt Project is still the basis for the ORC. It is long in the tooth and old-fashioned. What is going to happen next is some graduate students are going to come up with some neural network-based rule. The timing will be just right in a year or two because people will be really frustrated with the ORC. It will start another 15- to 20-year cycle until people get tired of that rule.”

Until then, he says, US Sailing must focus on providing high-quality measurement services and supporting PHRF by providing a first-class online database with regional ratings and guidelines to help race committees manage local fleets. “PHRF should be kept at the entry level and use single time-on-time scoring,” Honey says. “Any event that wants to do wind-condition scoring should move on to another rule. Any sailor that wants to optimize their boat for different races should go do some different rule.”

A few venerable American races, such the Newport to Bermuda and the Transpacific Race, continue to use the ORR rule. However, in recent years, the Offshore Racing Association, which controls ORR, has struggled to keep its operation functioning. The ORC rule has a chance to be more broadly adopted domestically, but its managers need to work with American race organizers to improve the rule. PHRF has a promising future, but would be well-served to update its operations to make it easy to use. In our age of supercomputer technology, we have the capability to make improvements to handicap rating rules.

Honey suggests improvements can be made by using direct computational fluid dynamics for both hydrodynamics and aerodynamics, which is likely to be the first major improvement. The CFD would be incorporated in the rating calculator and run for each boat from the lines files and measurements. “The technology exists now and is becoming practical as computers become more powerful,” he says. “This would be a major step forward from the VPP in use now by ORC and ORR. I think ORC and ORR are considering such a development.”

US Sailing has hired veteran handicap rating administrator Jim Teeters to oversee the offshore office, and Alan Ostfield, US Sailing’s new CEO, has committed to hiring additional personnel to help Teeters get the operation running efficiently. To assist owners through the arduous measurement process, Honey is an advocate of using the Universal Measurement System, which allows boats to be measured once, with the measurement data used for any ­handicap rating rule.

Sailors and handicappers clearly don’t agree on what the ideal handicapping rule should be, but every sailor does want a fair chance of winning a race if they sail well. We all need to work together to make improvements so that when the wind is right and we sail a perfect race, we can be rewarded with the win.

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Ratings & Measurement

Rating systems, handicaps and yardsticks, and class certification are what define a boat's equipment and how it is scored in a race..

Classes are defined by measurement rules. Handicapping allows boats to compete across classes and allows boats and crews to compete based on performance and equipment on an equal basis.

Systems such as IRC, ORC International and ORC Club are independent data based ratings of a boat's performance potential and provide events scoring options that are scientific and unbiased. Superior to performance handicapping, clubs with keelboat fleets are encouraged to take advantage of these services.

To enquire about ratings email [email protected]  or phone 02 9170 6917.

Sail Numbers

Sail numbers are an important way of uniquely identifying a vessel for a variety of purposes. They are a requirement for racing, and could be critical in a search and rescue situation.

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  • Performance Handicapping: A Sailor’s-Guide
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PHS in this document means “Performance Handicap System”. It relates to a handicap system that adjusts a boat’s handicap after each race based on the “performance” of that boat relative to another boat(s) in that particular fleet.

From the TopYacht point of view, PHS is the mathematics used to calculate the new handicap for each boat after each race. TopYacht provides over 20 parameters that the club can adjust to calculate the next handicap.

“Measured Boat” Handicapping.

Measured boat handicapping is where a number of dimensions and criteria such as weight of a boat are measured and these are input into a special computer formula. The formula will then provide a handicap figure that is designed to make this boat as ‘equivalent’ as possible to other measured boats using the same model. To make matters more complex, there are several different models that produce different outcomes. The Measured boat handicap value remains constant for the life of the boat. Boats may require remeasuring if the ‘officials’ elect to change the model, or the owner carries out some alterations to the boat or rig.  Measured boat handicapping is not the topic of this paper.

“Performance” Handicapping (PHS).

Measured performance strives to provide handicaps for all competitors by comparing their performance with the performance of other competitors. Note the deliberately used term “competitor”. Under this system the boat along with its skipper and crew are being compared with other “competitors”. The same boat with a different crew may perform somewhat differently. Measured performance handicapping makes no attempt to distinguish whether the performance is due to the boat or her crew but rather they are consider as a single entity called a ”competitor”.

Continue reading: Click HERE (~ 3 Pages)

  • Handicap systems
  • portsmouth-yardstick

An easy way for different classes of dinghy to be competitively race against each other.

What is the Portsmouth Yardstick Scheme?

The Portsmouth Yardstick System aims to handicap boats based on their relative performance against the other boats they race with. Handicaps are allocated and administered by clubs to suit their local factors such as boat type, wind trends and water type as well as enabling the club to evaluate crew skill factor.

Aims of the scheme

  • To give all clubs the tools to run the fairest handicap racing possible at club, open and national level events. 
  • To handicap any boat without the need for measurement 
  • To be easily administered by club members 
  • To keep a working relationship between clubs and the RYA

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How the scheme works

In order to score a handicap race each boats elapsed time (time taken to sail around the race course) must be converted to a corrected time (time converted based on a boats handicap).

This is done by applying a simple correction calculation to each boats elapsed time. 

Want to know more?

Current Base list for PY racing.

A recommended number for dinghies we don't have enough data on to produce an annual update.

This list is the standard format for how classes should be recorded and submitted for PY returns - Download excel spreadsheet.

Advice on PY notice of race and sailing instructions for your club.

An excel spreadsheet to simply work out your starting order

A simple tool to help clubs develop closer more competitive club racing.

Small Catamaran Handicap Rating System

Clubs that have an active multihull fleet within their club racing may use the Small Catamaran Handicap Rating system (SHCRS)for rating multihulls.

If a club also races mixed fleets where Dinghies, Keelboats and Multihulls race together an agreed conversion rate is used between the RYA and the SCHRS to convert SCHRS to PN "look alike" number.

Any club that uses PN's for Multihulls or PN "look alike" numbers based on SCHRS number is strongly encouraged to use the PYOnline analysis website to further adjust PN's to ensure they are as statistically as accurate as possible.

Table of Contents

  • points equal to the average, to the nearest tenth of a point (0.05 to be rounded upward), of her points in all the races in the series except the race in question;
  • points equal to the average, to the nearest tenth of a point (0.05 to be rounded upward), of her points in all the races before the race in question; or
  • points based on the position of the boat in the race at the time of the incident that justified redress. 

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RORC Rating Office » RYA YTC

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National rating system for cruiser racers

RYA YTC Application Form Use this form to apply for an RYA YTC Certificate if your boat has not held one before. This form cannot be used for renewal or amendments, please use the RYA YTC Application Link Request Form below.

RYA YTC Application Link Request Form Use this form to renew an expired RYA YTC certificate, update your application if your certificate has not yet been issued, or make an amendment once the certificate has been issued.

RYA YTC Listings View the current boats rated in RYA YTC and filter by sailing club etc.

RYA YTC Boat Data Use this form to view measurement data for any RYA YTC valid boat.

RYA YTC Club Registration Form Use this form to register your sailing club for RYA YTC.

RYA YTC information and downloads

The RYA YTC powered by the RORC Rating Office is an initiative to promote club level participation in racing by cruising yachts and cruiser-racers. The objective is to provide a simple rating assessment so that skippers of any skill level may feel encouraged to race their boats in club events and port regattas. YTC has a proven ability to provide closely competitive racing for a wide variety of yachts. YTC is supported by the RYA (the UK sport’s governing body) and uses the experience of the RORC Rating Office to administer the system.

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Sailboat racing.

Calculations are based on published/builder/web/owner supplied data, ByCN background and program change detail is here. For a handicap rating calculation for your cruiser, just complete this request form .

To view information select from the following links.

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St.Lawrence Valley Yacht Racing Association

Information On How To Obtain A Valid PHRF Handicap

yacht racing handicaps

You Must Contact Your Club Handicapper. All The  SLVYRA Affiliated Clubs  Are Represented At The Handicapper’s Regional Committee. The SLVYRA  Handicapper’s List  Is Available On This Website.

To Establish Your PHRF Handicap, Your Club Handicapper Will Need Some Information About Your Boat Equipment; Name Of Boat, Type Of Boat, Sail Number, Engine Type, Propeller Type, Number And Type Of Sails, Type Of Handicap (With Spi Or White Sails).

Once The PHRF Handicap Is Established, The Club Handicapper Passes On The Information To The SLVYRA Chief Handicapper Who Is In Charge Of Updating The Regional List Of Handicaps Showed On This Site. This List Is Updated 6 Or 7 Times During The Sailing Season.

If you are not a member of a Club affiliated with SLVYRA

You must contact the SLVYRA Chief Handicapper directly .

To Establish Your PHRF Handicap, The Chief Handicapper Will Need Some Information About Your Boat Equipment; Name Of Boat, Type Of Boat, Sail Number, Engine Type, Propeller Type, Number And Type Of Sails, Type Of Handicap (With Spi Or White Sails).

Once The PHRF Handicap Is Established, The SLVYRA Chief Handicapper Will Update The Regional List Of Handicaps Showed On This Site. This List Is Updated 6 Or 7 Times During The Sailing Season.

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Download your RYA National Handicap for Cruisers list

Dennis O'Neill

  • Dennis O'Neill
  • July 16, 2013

Make more of your boat by taking part in some summer racing...

Racing for cruisers

YM August 2013

The RYA’s National Handicap for Cruisers (NHC) list means you and your boat can now be given a Base Number taht allows you to easily take part in races and regattas.

For our full report, see Yachting Monthly August 2013.

Download the complete NHC list here…

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  • Full handicap £55
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  • One-Design £10 - only for Recognised one-design classes - see also footnote (a)
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  • tacked on to the furling drum gear only, which will normally be fitted above deck level
  • capable of being rolled/unrolled without the need to attach or detach any fitting or require any sail folding

Handicaps are then stored and displayed with a codification structured as follows:

Explanatory Material

  • One Design "Recognition" Criteria

Clubs organising racing under CYCA Handicaps should note that: (a) all yachts wishing to compete under CYCA Handicap should have a current valid certificate. For rigidly-controlled one-designs, with classes qualifying for this designation being agreed by the Executive from time to time, certificates will be issued on payment of the current fee. Enforcement of these requirements ensures that the cost of the system is borne by all of those benefiting from it, and that CYCA Subscriptions payable by Clubs are kept to a minimum. The CYCA reserves the right to refuse to issue a handicap to a boat with an unusual design. (b) consistent with IRC rule 14 (Manual Power), containing rule 14.1 which states " RRS 52, Manual Power, shall not apply", racing under CYCA Handicap will permit the use of Stored Power for winches etc provided that the Notice of Race and Sailing Instructions have adequately made clear that RRS 52 will not apply. Such use of Stored Power will NOT form the basis for any allowances from standard.

  • Handicap Manual (HM) Introduction
  • HM1 - All Boats by Name (1st 4 pages)
  • HM2 - One-offs by Handicap
  • HM3 - Boats by Class (1st 4 pages)
  • HM4 - Cruising/Lapsed (1st 4 pages)
  • HM5 - All Boats by Sail No (1st 4 pages)
  • HM6 - Classes by Name (1st 4 pages)
  • HM7 - Classes by H'cap (1st 4 pages)

Handicap Manual For clubs organising racing under CYCA Handicapping, the Association offers a season-long "Handicap Manual Process". This was traditionally in the form of a hard-copy manual issued in April, with Monthly Update Lists provided during the season - or "on demand" when required. Due to increased printing and postage costs, and reduced demand, this option was withdrawn in 2013. The Association therefore now offers two modes of operation: 1. No Fee: Clubs obtain the information they require from the website using the Boat/Class look-up facility. 2. £15 Fee: Clubs subscribe to an "electronic manual" service whereby an up-to-date manual is issued as a set of PDFs every month, or "on demand", and print only what they require. The PDFs will in total be about 1MB and easily sent by email. A monthly update list will also be sent by email to identify, cumulatively, changes made since the Datum Date at the start of the season. Sample sections of the manual can be accessed via the links here. Note that the data in these samples is deliberately NOT CURRENT and is INCOMPLETE . They should not be used in lieu of an official version obtained by subscription. These samples are included only to illustrate what is provided via this option. Results Analysis and Feedback Any handicapping process requires feedback to identify anomalies. The Association would like to encourage structured feedback from clubs, as feedback from owners tends to focus only on handicaps which are perceived by them to be "tight". For clubs using HAL's Racing Results, versions since 2009 have included structured analyses for ANY handicapping system. These can be sent on to the system's owners in whatever format they would prefer. The CYCA Handicap Committee will accept any form of feedback provided it is based on data. HRR is free. Clubs interested should access Hopford Associates' website, from which the system can be downloaded. It is already extensively used by CYCA constituent clubs, and the CYCA Hon Secretary can provide further information if required.

The CYCA is all about you and the boating you do. So why not get in contact and let us know what’s important to you.

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Easy race timing and series scoring

yacht racing handicaps

  • Calculate corrected times and series rankings - including tiebreaks and penalties
  • Easily record live finishing times from a smart phone, tablet or laptop
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  • No download necessary - runs in browser or as a standalone app
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  • Record times and line up approaching boats by either clicking, searching or using the timed dictaphone
  • Internal database of (PYN, Byron, IRC, NHC, PHRF, SCHRF & VPRS) handicaps
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Silk - Light blue, dark blue hollow box, striped sleeves and cap

Chillhi (IRE)

  • Form 5406-62
  • Trainer B Ellison
  • Jockey Ben Robinson

Silk - White and Orange (quartered), White sleeves, Orange armlets, Orange cap

  • Form 70569-1
  • Official Rating 69
  • Trainer A W Carroll
  • Jockey J F Egan

Yokkell (IRE) 12-1 (9-10) Went right from stalls, soon prominent, rapid headway 3f out, raced wide home turn, ridden before 1f out, weakened inside final furlong, 7th of 12, 7 3/4l behind Aqwaam (9-10) at Lingfield 2m hcp (3) pol in Mar.

Chase The Dollar 18-1 (9-9) Made all, 2 lengths clear 2f out, increased lead approaching final furlong, ran on, won at Chester 1m 4f hcp (4) gf in May beating Turner Girl (9-6) by 6l, 8 ran.

Maso Bastie 16-1 (9-3) Towards rear, ridden and headway over 1f out, soon every chance, kept on same pace, 6th of 14, 3 3/4l behind Kotari (9-1) at Ascot 1m 4f hcp (3) gd in May.

Cavern Club (IRE) 18-1 (9-7) In touch in mid-division, effort and switched left over 1f out, kept on, joined for 3rd post, 3rd of 12, 1 1/2l behind Ninth Life (9-2) at Southwell 1m 3f hcp (4) pol in Mar.

Chillhi (IRE) 5-2 (9-9) Close up on inner, pushed along and headway to track leaders over 1f out, ridden to chase winner inside final furlong, no impression towards finish, 2nd of 7, 1 1/4l behind Oman (8-10) at Chester 1m 4f hcp (4) gf in May.

Oman (IRE) 22-1 (8-10) Keen led 2f, tracked leaders, chased leader 2f out, led approaching final furlong, ridden and ran on, won at Chester 1m 4f hcp (4) gf in May beating Chillhi (9-9) by 1 1/4l, 7 ran.

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COMMENTS

  1. PDF North American Portsmouth Yardstick Handbook

    The North American Portsmouth Yardstick is an empirical handicapping system meant to provide equitable scoring of race results for different boats sailing the same course. The system originated from an effort led by the Dixie Inland Yacht Racing Association (DIYRA) based on the Royal Yachting Association Portsmouth Numbers (PN) scheme.

  2. IRC Rating

    IRC is a rating rule to handicap different designs of keelboats allowing them to race together. Ratings are based on the physical measurements of the boat.

  3. ORC

    The Offshore Racing Congress is the world leader in rating technology, serving 45 countries in modern VPP-based handicap systems for a fair and competitive sailing . ORC Rating Systems ... It has issued over 14,000 certificates to yachts across 45 countries, encompassing a diverse spectrum, from Sportboats to Superyachts and Multihulls. ...

  4. Handicap systems

    The RYA administers two handicapping systems used in the UK allowing different class of boats to compete against each other. Portsmouth Yardstick. The RYA Portsmouth Yardstick is a scheme operated jointly by the RYA and its Affiliated clubs. The scheme, used worldwide, is reviewed yearly and amended to keep handicaps up to date, including new ...

  5. Handicap Rating Rule Options for 2022

    Stan Honey, an authority on offshore racing and handicap systems, says American sailors became frustrated with the ORC in the 1980s for not fixing known problems with IOR.

  6. World Sailing

    Learn about the different ratings and handicap systems that measure the performance of sailing boats and crews in various events and conditions.

  7. Handicap (sailing)

    Performance Handicap Racing Fleet (PHRF) is a handicapping system used for yacht racing in North America. It allows dissimilar classes of sailboats to be raced against each other. The aim is to cancel out the inherent advantages and disadvantages of each class of boats, so that results reflect crew skill rather than equipment superiority.

  8. Performance Handicap Racing Fleet

    Performance Handicap Racing Fleet (PHRF) is a handicapping system used for yacht racing in North America. It allows dissimilar classes of sailboats to be raced against each other. The aim is to cancel out the inherent advantages and disadvantages of each class of boats, so that results reflect crew skill rather than equipment superiority.

  9. New national rating system for cruiser racers unveiled

    The system provides an excellent, simple entry-level introduction to racing without the need for personal handicapping, and we are enthusiastic that expansion will help many clubs increase their racing fleets. For those keen to progress further it acts as a simple stepping-stone to IRC racing, the gold standard for rating."

  10. Ratings & Measurement

    Superior to performance handicapping, clubs with keelboat fleets are encouraged to take advantage of these services. To enquire about ratings email [email protected] or phone 02 9170 6917. IRC. I RC rates measured data such as a boat's weight, length, draft, rig and sail area, as well as special features like water ballast, canting keels ...

  11. Performance Handicapping: A Sailor's-Guide

    PHS in this document means "Performance Handicap System". It relates to a handicap system that adjusts a boat's handicap after each race based on the "performance" of that boat relative to another boat (s) in that particular fleet. From the TopYacht point of view, PHS is the mathematics used to calculate the new handicap for each boat ...

  12. portsmouth-yardstick

    The Portsmouth Yardstick System aims to handicap boats based on their relative performance against the other boats they race with. Handicaps are allocated and administered by clubs to suit their local factors such as boat type, wind trends and water type as well as enabling the club to evaluate crew skill factor.

  13. Yacht racing

    Yacht racing is a sailing sport involving sailing yachts and larger sailboats, as distinguished from dinghy racing, ... (IOR) of the 1970s, contributed to much decreased seaworthiness (and even speed), the simpler Performance Handicap Racing Fleet (PHRF) system was adopted. The PHRF uses only proven performance characteristics, especially ...

  14. ByHandicaps

    ByCN race handicap listing for yachts / keelboats / cruisers, both monohull and multihull sailboats in handicap order. Byron Software and Services. Sailboat Racing. Key - description:- ByCN: Class portsmouth handicap Numbers are quoted for an upper quartile version rather than the Class median version. In general terms that means, handicaps ...

  15. RRS

    A5.1. A boat that did not start, sail the course or finish or comply with rule 30.2 , 30.3 , 30.4 or 78.2 , or that retires or takes a penalty under rule 44.3 (a), shall be scored accordingly by the race committee without a hearing. Only the protest committee may take other scoring actions that worsen a boat's score. A5.2.

  16. RYA YTC

    RYA YTC information and downloads. The RYA YTC powered by the RORC Rating Office is an initiative to promote club level participation in racing by cruising yachts and cruiser-racers. The objective is to provide a simple rating assessment so that skippers of any skill level may feel encouraged to race their boats in club events and port regattas.

  17. Individual Performance Handicapping

    Yacht racing handicaps are unique in that the handicap is based on the equipment of the sport rather than the competitor's performance. League based sports (softball, volleyball, etc.) sort ...

  18. Byron Boats

    By Boat Class Type. By Race Category. If you use our 'contribution to the sport' or just agree with our attempts to promote 'fair play' then please use the PayPal Donate button/link. Sailboat portsmouth handicap / yardstick lists for yachts / keelboats / dayboats / cruisers, both monohull and multihull sailboats. Refer RYA site for dinghy PY.

  19. Handicaps

    Handicaps. Performance Handicap Racing Fleet ( PHRF) is a handicapping system used for yacht racing in North America. It allows dissimilar classes of sailboats to be raced against each other. The aim is to cancel out the inherent advantages and disadvantages of each class of boats, so that results reflect crew skill rather than equipment ...

  20. Download your RYA National Handicap for Cruisers list

    Make more of your boat by taking part in some summer racing... The RYA's National Handicap for Cruisers (NHC) list means you and your boat can now be given a Base Number taht allows you to easily take part in races and regattas. For our full report, see Yachting Monthly August 2013. Download the complete NHC list here….

  21. The Clyde Yacht Clubs Association

    Handicaps are managed by a Handicap Committee comprising racing helmsmen, sailmakers and other professionals in the leisure marine business. Handicaps are primarily assigned by "class" or "type", with new designs assessed based on weight, rig and hull/keel shape. The CYCA handicap database currently recognises over 1,200 classes or types of boat.

  22. OOD2

    Live results on your club website. Simple, intuitive design - easily find boats and line up finishers. Record times and line up approaching boats by either clicking, searching or using the timed dictaphone. Internal database of (PYN, Byron, IRC, NHC, PHRF, SCHRF & VPRS) handicaps. Dual Scoring for NHC and IRC.

  23. PDF 2024 Cruzan Rum Race Series

    Boats without an established handicap, shall have one assigned by Race Chairman or Fleet Captain. 10.2. PHRF Handicaps are those shown on each yacht's 2024 PHRF-GB rating certificate. Yachts may not take adjustments for different headsail sizes on a per race basis. Yachts may elect to race in any class on a per race basis.

  24. Preakness Day Picks And 2024 Horse Racing Odds And Best Bets ...

    Higher payoff potential in Friday's Race 10 and the $150,000 Miss Preakness Stakes (G3) with 12 entries. #4 Launch (9/2) #7 Carmelina (12/1) #3 Youalmosthadme (2/1) Mystik Dan is now the ...

  25. Racecard

    Follow horse racing with Alex Hammond on Sky Sports - get live racing results, racecards, news, videos, photos, stats (horses & jockeys), plus daily tips.

  26. Racecard

    Follow horse racing with Alex Hammond on Sky Sports - get live racing results, racecards, news, videos, photos, stats (horses & jockeys), plus daily tips. ... Seat Unique Handicap (Class 4) 6 ...

  27. Race 2

    Horse racing news, fixtures, race reports, features and analysis. back to sport. Toggle Menu. South China Morning Post. Home; ... Race Two : (686) - HEREFORD HANDICAP - Class 4 - 1200Meters

  28. Racecard

    Oman (IRE) 22-1 (8-10) Keen led 2f, tracked leaders, chased leader 2f out, led approaching final furlong, ridden and ran on, won at Chester 1m 4f hcp (4) gf in May beating Chillhi (9-9) by 1 1/4l ...

  29. Seize The Grey wins Preakness Stakes as Derby winner Mystik Dan comes

    Seize The Grey bested an eight-horse field to win the 149th running of the Preakness Stakes at a muddy Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore. Entering the race at 9-1 odds, Seize The Grey ran ahead of ...