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ghostwire video game

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ghostwire video game

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ghostwire video game

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  • Ghostwire: Tokyo Game

Ghostwire: Tokyo – Spider’s Thread Update

ghostwire video game

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https://store.steampowered.com/app/1817250/Ghostwire_Tokyo__Prelude/

About This Game

A beautifully haunted tokyo, devastating elemental abilities, explore all-new content with the ghostwire: tokyo spider's thread update, system requirements.

  • Requires a 64-bit processor and operating system
  • OS: 64bit Windows10 (version 1909 or higher)
  • Processor: Core i7 4770K @3.5ghz / Ryzen 5 2600
  • Memory: 12 GB RAM
  • Graphics: GTX1060 / RX5500XT / Arc A380* (VRAM 6GB or higher)
  • DirectX: Version 12
  • Storage: 26 GB available space
  • Additional Notes: SSD Storage, *Please check Intel's website for Arc compatible CPU and motherboard requirements.
  • Processor: Core i7 6700 @3.4ghz / Ryzen 5 2600
  • Memory: 16 GB RAM
  • Graphics: GTX1080 / RX5600XT / Arc A750* (VRAM 6GB or higher)

© 2021 Bethesda Softworks LLC, a ZeniMax Media company. Ghostwire, Tango, Tango Gameworks, Bethesda, Bethesda Softworks, ZeniMax and related logos are registered trademarks or trademarks of ZeniMax Media Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries. All Rights Reserved.

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Ghostwire: Tokyo logo

  • Key features
  • Prelude visual novel
  • PS5 features

Ghostwire: Tokyo - Key Art

Ghostwire: Tokyo

  • Offline play enabled
  • Remote Play supported
  • PS5 Version Vibration function and trigger effect supported (DualSense wireless controller)
  • Game Help supported
  • PS5 game streaming supported only with Premium subscription

ESRB Teen

What is Ghostwire: Tokyo?

Face the unknown, discover the truth and save the city.

Tokyo is overrun by deadly supernatural forces as a dangerous occultist causes the city's population to vanish in an instant.

Join forces with a powerful spectral entity on their quest for vengeance and master a powerful arsenal of abilities to unravel the dark truth behind the disappearance as you face the unknown in Ghostwire: Tokyo. 

GhostWire: Tokyo – Background Art

Buy Ghostwire: Tokyo on PlayStation Store

GhostWire: Tokyo – icons art

Standard Edition

Deluxe Edition

Deluxe Edition

  • Streetwear Outfit Pack
  • Shinobi Outfit & Kunai Weapon

Prelude

Ghostwire: Tokyo key features

Ghostwire Tokyo screenshot

A beautifully haunted Tokyo

Explore a unique vision of Tokyo twisted by a supernatural presence. From its ultra-modern cityscape to its traditional temples and narrow alleyways, discover a hauntingly beautiful city teeming with Yokai - vengeful spirits that prowl the streets. 

Discover iconic landmarks like Shibuya Crossing and Tokyo Tower, frozen in time when the city’s population disappeared and travel to the surreal underworld on your quest to save your family. 

Ghostwire Tokyo screenshot

Next-gen immersion

Experience a stunningly rendered, rain-soaked Tokyo with PlayStation 5's next-gen ray tracing technology and 3D AudioTech. Feel the power of your supernatural skills firsthand with unique haptic feedback and adaptive triggers for every combat ability and character action in-game.

Ghostwire Tokyo screenshot

Devastating Elemental Abilities

Wield a combination of upgradeable elemental powers and ghost-hunting skills to combat the supernatural threat. Use your ethereal abilities to ascend to the to the top of Tokyo's skyline and soar over the streets to discover new missions or even get the drop on your enemies.

What to expect in Ghostwire: Tokyo

Ghostwire: Tokyo screenshot - Banshee

Lamentation

Ghostwire: Tokyo screenshot - Kappa Boy

Ghostwire: Tokyo Spider's Thread update

Free for all players, the Spider's Thread update contains several additions to the base game, including a new area to explore, extended cutscenes, new side-missions, all-new enemies, added quality of life improvements, extra combat skills and a new roguelite "The Spider's Thread" game mode!

Ghostwire: Tokyo screenshot showing the new Middle School area

Explore new areas and go deeper into the story

Solve a spooky mystery in the all-new Middle School area, complete with the new “School Ghost” and “Spirit Photo” side missions, plus gain more insight into the main story of Ghostwire: Tokyo through extended cutscenes.

Ghostwire: Tokyo screenshot showing a red-walled room with wooden beams and cushions scattered across the floor

Test your skills in a new roguelite mode

“The Spider’s Thread” is a new roguelite mode where you'll be challenged to solve the mystery of the Tatariya by clearing 30 randomly selected stages, with over 120 tailored challenges to conquer.

Ghostwire: Tokyo screenshot showing a ghostly entity made of ice holding an umbrella

Expand your Spirit Skills and battle new foes

Your combat arsenal grows with the new Perfect Guard Counter Attack and Quick Dodge maneuvers. Also added are Charge Rush skills – powerful, short-range elemental attacks powered by your Ethereal Weaving. You’ll need powered-up skills to face new enemies terrorizing Tokyo, such as the Retribution that can 'swim' underground, the invisible Silent Gaze and the high-flying Sanguine Dancer.

Ghostwire: Tokyo screenshot showing the main character surrounded by sticker graphics

Photo mode enhancements, graffiti and more!

Capture memorable photos with the expanded features of the Photo Mode. Find graffiti around the city in the new activity “Capsule Machines”. For those who really don’t like spooky games, you can replace certain spiritual effects with the “Reduced Horror Effects” setting.

Ghostwire: Tokyo - Prelude key artwork

Ghostwire: Tokyo - Prelude

Play it first for free on PlayStation.

Experience the mysterious events leading into Tango Gameworks’ highly anticipated action-adventure game, Ghostwire: Tokyo! 

In Ghostwire: Tokyo – Prelude, join the mysterious KK and his gang of supernatural detectives as they investigate an unusual disappearance, only to stumble upon something even more sinister. Build relationships with your team and piece together their stories in this visual novel adventure before taking to the streets of Ghostwire: Tokyo.

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How innovative PS5 features enhance Ghostwire: Tokyo

PlayStation 5 console and DualSense controller

  • Stunning visuals : With ray tracing and HDR 1 , the power and speed of the PlayStation 5 console allows you to explore Tango Gameworks' unique vision of Tokyo twisted by a supernatural presence.
  • Adaptive triggers : Whether fighting with conventional weapons or supernatural powers, adaptive triggers drive you directly into the action.
  • Haptic feedback : Feel the power of your paranormal abilities with unique haptic feedback for every ability and character action in Ghostwire: Tokyo.
  • Fast loading : Get into the action with near instant load times and traverse the haunted streets of Tokyo without load times thanks to the PlayStation 5 console's ultra high-speed SSD.
  • Tempest 3D AudioTech 2 : An ominous giggle behind you. A distant dog's bark. The PS5 console's 3D audio will immerse you in the eerie streets of this unique take on Tokyo. 

1 Dynamic 4K and HDR require a compatible 4K & HDR compatible TV or display. 2 Requires compatible headphones

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ghostwire video game

Ghostwire: Tokyo

Tokyo's population has vanished, and deadly supernatural forces prowl the streets. Use an arsenal of abilities to unravel the truth behind the disappearance and save Tokyo.

FACE THE UNKNOWN

Tokyo's population has vanished, and deadly supernatural forces prowl the streets. Use an arsenal of elemental abilities to unravel the truth behind the disappearance and save Tokyo.

Trailers and gameplay

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Games built using the Xbox Series X|S development kit are designed to take advantage of the unique capabilities of the Xbox Series X|S. They will showcase unparalleled load-times, visuals, responsiveness, and framerates up to 120FPS.

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What’s new with Ghostwire: Tokyo

Akito and KK stand on a rooftop against the backdrop of Tokyo with a second, inverted Tokyo skyline suspended in the sky.

Spider’s Thread Update – Available now

Get the definitive Ghostwire: Tokyo experience with this free update for all players! The Spider’s Thread update brings several additions to the base game, including a new area to explore, extended cutscenes, new quests, all-new enemies, quality of life improvements and much more.

Game features

A silhouetted figure, holding an umbrella, walks under torii through the mist.

A beautifully haunted Tokyo

Explore a unique vision of Tokyo twisted by a supernatural presence. From its ultra-modern cityscape to its traditional temples and narrow alleyways, discover a hauntingly beautiful city teeming with Yokai - vengeful spirits that prowl the streets.

Akito uses his ethereal abilities, emitting green tendrils and sparks from his hands.

Devastating elemental abilities

Wield a combination of elemental powers and ghost-hunting skills to combat the supernatural threat. Use your ethereal abilities to ascend to the top of Tokyo's skyline and soar over the streets to discover missions or get the drop on your enemies.

An empty school hallway at night.

Explore new areas and uncover more story

Solve a mystery surrounding the ominous halls of the all-new Middle School area, as well as gain more insight into the main story of Ghostwire: Tokyo with extended cutscenes!

A web of shipping crates hang suspended in the sky against the backdrop of a dark moon.

Take on an-all new game mode

Players must navigate a randomized, 30-stage gauntlet of hand-crafted stages! It won’t be easy at first, but surviving each stage and completing its challenges will reward you currency to spend on upgrades to become stronger.

The translucent outline of a spirit standing on street pavement covered with blue spectral footprints.

Boost your skills to battle new foes

Expand your arsenal of skills with the Counter Attack and Quick Dodge. Boost your Ethereal Weaving with the all-new Charge Rush attack! You’ll need as many skills as you can to face new threats such as Retribution, Silent Gaze or Sanguine Dancer.

Hannya emerges from a white glowing torii.

Game details

Face the unknown, uncover the truth and save the city.

Tokyo is overrun by deadly supernatural forces, perpetrated by a dangerous occultist, causing Tokyo’s population to vanish in an instant. Ally with a powerful spectral entity on their quest for vengeance and master a powerful arsenal of abilities to unravel the dark truth behind the disappearance as you FACE THE UNKNOWN in Ghostwire: Tokyo.

Discover iconic landmarks like Shibuya Crossing and Tokyo Tower, stunningly rendered with incredible detail and built to take advantage of next-generation technology. Experience the city frozen in time when the city’s population disappeared, and travel to the surreal underworld on your quest to save your family.

Additional information

ghostwire video game

Rating Pending

  • May contain content inappropriate for children. Visit esrb.org for rating information.

Bethesda Softworks

Tango Gameworks

Action Adventure

Xbox Series X|S

Release date

April 12, 2023

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  • Kunai Weapon Skin

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© 2023 Bethesda Softworks LLC, a ZeniMax Media company. Ghostwire, Tango, Tango Gameworks, Bethesda, Bethesda Softworks, ZeniMax and related logos are registered trademarks or trademarks of ZeniMax Media Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries. All Rights Reserved.

Here's How Ghostwire: Tokyo Actually Works

A developer deep-dive has explained the game's open world, combat, and more..

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Ghostwire: Tokyo has been something of a mystery since Bethesda unveiled the game in 2019, but a new gameplay deep-dive has finally shed light on how the game actually works, including its open world and combat mechanics.

Tango Gameworks, developers of The Evil Within, revealed the game is an open world set in a haunted Tokyo following "the Vanishing", a paranormal occurance where 99% of the population vanished.

The city has become overrun with spirits from Japanese mythology and the player must use a combined arsenal of supernatural powers and traditional weaponry to save it.

Ghostwire: Tokyo's open world, despite its fairly unique setting, appears to take on more traditional elements of the genre

A standard menu map allows the navigation of a Tokyo packed with main missions, side quests, and points of interest that involve defeating enemies within a certain location to clear surrounding fog.

These areas are marked by corrupted torii gates that players must cleanse in order to clear the fog, and there are several – big and small – scattered throughout Tokyo.

Ghostwire: Tokyo - 6 New Screenshots

ghostwire video game

Another open world activity is the inclusion of strange spaces throughout the map that lean back into Tango Gameworks' horror past. The player must walk through corridors "where time and space cannot be trusted" which look to be something like a toned-down version of P.T. "The only way to complete your mission is to power through," the deep-dive narrator explains.

Traversal around the city is also "an essential part" of Ghostwire: Tokyo and the player has access to what is essentially a grapple-hook, known here as the Tengu Ability. The player can latch onto flying Tengu monsters to leap onto and across rooftops, and appears to have a glide ability as well.

There's also a "Spectral Vision" pulse , essentially a detective mode, that reveals enemies and points of interest in the vicinity.

At the centre of Ghostwire: Tokyo's combat is a skill called "Ethereal Weaving" that's used to fight the monsters that appeared after the Vanishing.

It fuses spiritual energy with fire, air, or water to launch close or long-range attacks at the variety of enemies that require different playstyles to defeat.

Incoming attacks can also be parried and the player's supernatural powers can be charged up to enter "Wire-In" mode and unleash more powerful attacks.

Ghostwire Tokyo PlayStation 5 Screenshots

ghostwire video game

The player will also unlock more "traditional" weapons such as a bow and arrow (the gameplay showed regular and explosive arrows) and talismans that explode with lightning.

Ghostwire: Tokyo also features stealth gameplay and has dedicated stealth sections where the player's supernatural abilities are stripped away, forcing a reliance on "wits and traditional weapons".

Typical RPG mechanics are also present, with earned skill points used to unlock different "abilities" and "Ethereal Weaving" power-ups.

Ghostwire: Tokyo opens as main character Akito wakes up after the Vanishing. 99% of the population is gone, the city is flooded with supernatural creatures, and there's a demon called K.K. in your head. What a morning.

Akito must master his new abilities to fight ghouls and figure out what happened to Tokyo , not to mention save it. From there, it's anyone's guess where we'll go next.

The game will finally arrive on March 25 , and will likely be the last PlayStation console-exclusive Bethesda game . We know that Tango Gameworks is already hard at work on the next game after Ghostwire too.

In This Article

Ghostwire: Tokyo

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  • Entertainment

Ghostwire: Tokyo is creepy, thrilling, and a game that respects your time

An eerie mix of white knuckle action and quiet exploration.

By Andrew Webster , an entertainment editor covering streaming, virtual worlds, and every single Pokémon video game. Andrew joined The Verge in 2012, writing over 4,000 stories.

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ghostwire video game

They don’t make many games like Ghostwire: Tokyo anymore. The latest release from Tango Gameworks, the studio behind the terrifying Evil Within series, Ghostwire: Tokyo is a big-budget action game with a very specific focus. It isn’t stretched out with an unnecessarily large open world or superfluous online features. Instead, it offers something pure and straightforward: a mix of action, adventure, and scares in a tight package that can be wrapped up in less than 20 hours.

At the outset of the game, nearly every person in Tokyo has vanished, leaving the metropolis overrun with yokai, folklore creatures, urban legends, and vengeful spirits. You play as Akito, a human who was able to survive the cataclysm by merging with a spirit named KK, who infuses him with supernatural powers. The newly forged duo have a few goals in front of them: collecting the spirits of normal Tokyo residents that are still lingering around, rescuing Akito’s missing sister, clearing the city of a poisonous supernatural fog, and stopping an evil mastermind from creating a rift between the lands of the living and dead. Just a light to-do list.

Ghostwire actually feels like a mix of two very different kinds of games, which blend together rather seamlessly. At its core, it’s an action game that plays out kind of like a first-person shooter, only without guns. You’re able to wield a handful of different types of magic — wind, fire, and water — all of which have different attributes. Fire is great at long range, for instance, while you’ll want to use water once enemies get in close. There’s a Doom -like balletic feel to the combat , as you’re zipping around areas, ducking behind cover, and swapping between magic types that you blast from your hands. Much like in Doom , it pays to be aggressive; killing enemies can refill your health and magic, but you need to get up close to soak up the rewards. There’s also a very satisfying ability that lets you rip out the hearts of enemies for an extra magical bonus. The action has a wonderfully tactile sense to it, as you’re literally using your hands to wield spells and tear out hearts.

The game has a very video game-y structure to it. Navigating Tokyo means wandering the streets in search of both hordes of enemies to clear and shrines and temples that you can cleanse to get rid of that evil fog and open up more of the map. You also have to seek out lost souls, who are stranded all over the city, and use a paper doll called a katashiro to absorb them and then send them to safety using one of the many phone booths in Tokyo. (Don’t ask me how phone lines can transport spirits.) This serves as a kind of experience system; the more souls you save, the more you can upgrade your various abilities. It’s a fairly straightforward structure, but that’s also what I liked about it. I had enough freedom to be able to explore without ever feeling overwhelmed or lost. The only real issue I had was a few rather annoying sequences where the game temporarily robs you of your powers, forcing you to utilize stealth and an unwieldy bow and arrow to proceed.

ghostwire video game

Ghostwire is full of some truly creepy monsters: headless schoolgirls who will charge at you with reckless abandon, horrifying humans with hair that sprouts out like gigantic spider legs, and a seemingly innocuous woman who wields a devastating pair of scissors. (I really don’t like her.) The bosses, in particular, are massive and disturbingly mutated takes on familiar creatures. And the world will sometimes shift and change in uncomfortable ways; sometimes that’s a house that becomes submerged in a dark liquid, or smaller things like the white painted lines on the road suddenly floating in the breeze. At one point, I swore the ever-present rain was floating up.

But despite this — and despite the fact that the game comes from a studio founded by Resident Evil creator Shinji Mikami — Ghostwire isn’t a survival horror game. This is because I was so powerful in the game that I never found myself running for my life or looking for a place to hide like I do in Silent Hill and Resident Evil.

The action focus works well, and the story — despite leaving out a lot of detail and rendering most side characters very underdeveloped — has a good momentum to it, buoyed by the buddy cop-like relationship between Akito and KK. Their constant banter about life, death, and the state of KK’s apartment is a lot of fun. But the main story is overshadowed by the sidequests. 

Outside of the action, Ghostwire feels like a first-person indie exploration game. It reminded me a lot of 2015’s Everybody’s Gone to the Rapture . The streets of Tokyo may be empty of human life, but there’s still a lot going on; spirits in need of help or KK’s old case files from his previous life as a detective. These stories range from sorrowful to hilarious and feature my favorite moments from the game. One particularly dark quest has you investigating a building where everyone has mysteriously died by suicide, while another is about a hoarder who can’t let go of their stuff. It’s a collection of short stories about the city’s residents and their relationship with death. Think of it like Midnight Diner , but with ghosts.

ghostwire video game

I’d also be remiss if I didn’t mention the city itself. Ghostwire renders Tokyo with an astounding level of love and detail. You’ll explore familiar places, of course, like the Shibuya crossing and the labyrinth subway stations. But Ghostwire also sends you through the back alleys and generic office buildings and the shrines and graveyards that are hidden amongst the urban sprawl. It’s particularly eerie devoid of people –—though you’ll see lots of piles of clothing from those who suddenly vanished — but full of signs of life, whether it’s shopping bags full of snacks left laying around or music pulsating from the now-empty bars and restaurants.

You can even still shop at those amazing convenience stores since they’re now run by talking, floating cats. In fact, animals play a big part in the atmosphere of Ghostwire ; you can pet or feed the cats and dogs left in the city and even read their minds for hints. (It is, naturally, much easier to get the dogs to agree to some scratches than the more standoffish cats. And the elaborate petting animations feel designed for maximum Twitter virality.)

As games get bigger and longer, more bogged down by an increasing need to have all of your attention, experiences like Ghostwire are becoming increasingly rare. Already this year, we’ve seen the creators of Pokémon and Dark Souls release amazing new games that demand an incredible amount of your time and energy. Ghostwire , meanwhile, has elements of open-world and role-playing games, but they don’t overwhelm the core of the experience. Instead, it deftly balances all-out action with quiet exploration and wraps it all up in a world full of fascinating, sad, and hilarious stories to uncover.

It may freak you out, but it also respects your time.

Ghostwire: Tokyo launches March 25th on the PS5 and PC.

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Ghostwire: Tokyo

Ghostwire: Tokyo review

Uncomplicated fun with unfinished business., our verdict.

Fun combat and a sophisticated city burdened with the unfulfilled potential of a far scarier experience.

PC Gamer's got your back Our experienced team dedicates many hours to every review, to really get to the heart of what matters most to you. Find out more about how we evaluate games and hardware.

What is it? A neon-dunked action-adventure game set in Tokyo, Japan with ghost and ghouls galore Release date March 25 Expect to pay $60/£50 Developer Tango Gameworks Publisher Bethesda Reviewed on Ryzen 5 3600X, 32GB RAM, RTX 2070 Multiplayer? No Link Official site

You may not have realised it, but Ghostwire: Tokyo, developed by Tango Gameworks, is an action-adventure game. Going back and looking at the original teaser for Ghostwire may have led you to believe that the story was going to be closer to Silent Hill or Tango's The Evil Within series and, if that's the game you want, Ghostwire isn't for you. But if you want a neon Japanese adventure game where you get cool spirit powers and pet a bunch of dogs, walk right this way.

The main draw of Ghostwire: Tokyo is its combat. In 2022 we've seen a lot of very precise and punishing combat-driven games. The Elden Rings and Sifus of the world love to hurt you, and make you learn the rules of play in brutal ways. Ghostwire: Tokyo just wants to give you cool magic hands which shoot lights at a mess of bad guys, then watch them melt.

The combat is a lot of fun, and that's just as well because you'll do a lot of it. It's not overly complex or intricate. It's a mess of neon pulses in various hues, a few talismans which act as a sort of grenade and your spirit bow—my favourite of protagonist Akito's utilities. Eventually the game gives you enough archery buffs that you can take out most enemies with a clean headshot before they've even spotted you—whether that be from roof tops or down an adjacent alleyway.

Not every encounter's so clean. Crouched behind an abandoned car I draw my bow, looking to take out some of the floating enemies above my next objective. After running out of arrows I sneak behind a ghost in a suit, quickly executing a purge and ripping out its core, drawing the attention of three other wandering ghouls who attack. I swap to my wind powers, charging bursts to hit them, but they're getting closer and I'm ducking and diving to avoid their own magic offensive. I swap to fire and charge a blistering, blazing orb which I volley into the group. My explosion damages them all just enough to expose their cores and I use my ethereal weaving to latch onto their cores, rending them clean of their undead inhabitants. Pretty flippin' cool. 

Tango Gameworks does an incredible job making the city feel fresh and distinct.

The city of Ghostwire: Tokyo is a marvel. It's a detailed and intricate environment which, scattered with the clothes, bags, and phones of its inhabitants, feels truly abandoned. Though its details can get hazy as you sprint down the streets, Tango Gameworks does an incredible job making the city feel fresh and distinct across its various areas. Akito can squeeze down alleyways and vault any fence. And when the entire city is being patrolled by ghosts, hiding from them in nooks and crannies makes its layout feel pretty realistic.

Unfinished business

There is a lot that doesn't work about Ghostwire, sadly. The story is, eh, fine I guess. You play Akito, a man on a mission to save his little sister. Akito is in a car accident just before Tokyo is turned to spirits and KK, the ghost of a recently deceased spirit hunter, possesses Akito's weak body. They need each other because KK needs a body and Akito would be dead without KK's powers. They don't really like each other though. Their relationship is made up of grumbling complaints about being stuck with each other. Because they're men of action, of course they don't talk about their feelings or their histories. Akito's relationship with his sister Mari is told entirely through flashbacks in which he is still ashamed and avoiding his feelings. KK just doesn't trust Akito so doesn't want to chat about his family either. It's just two moody dudes hanging out. 

The best writing is of the bad guy Hannya, and Akito and KK's two allies Ed and Rinko. The latter especially is explored in more detail, because the protagonists because go back and forth about trusting her—exploring why KK's history with her is so complex. Akito and KK can't talk about themselves, but they're happy to talk about other people. Baddie Hannya provides the only 'oh shit' moment in the game, for my money, his cruelty and unhinged approach to life and death is genuinely unnerving, a contrast to the rest of the game's atmosphere.

Ghostwire: Tokyo is creepy but that's as far as it goes. It's not horror—it's action. Though Tango Gameworks is primarily known for The Evil Within, there isn't much to fear about Ghostwire: Tokyo, although it's filled with ghosts. I am a baby when it comes to horror. I've always had to watch any horror film from between my fingers or behind a pillow. Watching or playing anything with a horror element sets my brain ablaze with possibilities in how many different nefarious ways it could rattle me to my core. And I jumped maybe twice during Ghostwire, including a time I accidentally scared myself. 

Weird things happen, and you may be unnerved by going into the home of a malicious spectre. If you're looking for a good scare, you're not going to get it here—even if I did say "what the fuck is that" maybe three or four times when seeing a new enemy or one of the few bosses the game contains. 

There was potential to be scary though. There is one moment where I was genuinely fearing for Akito as he was suddenly left at the bottom of an underground mine without his spirit powers. You realise as you turn to look behind you that the way you came is now littered with monsters and, for just a moment, you hold your breath as you feel suddenly alone and intimidated by the task at hand. Hannya really could win. I can't do this. 

But hey, give the game ten minutes and you can go get your powers back from a temple by running past a bunch of these spirits or using your handy dandy sneaking abilities. From then on losing your abilities is a normal part of some fights and kind of no biggie. That fear you felt the first time just vanishes. And that's kind of the crux of the milquetoast horror of Ghostwire: Tokyo. Lots of potential but it just doesn't follow up.

What's unfortunate about the scope of the project is that one trailer for the game shows you almost everything you'll see. It's like those action movie trailers that ruin many of the set pieces before you've even got the chance to enjoy them in the cinema. The game has a few cool bosses and a couple of recurring quest situations that feel fresh, but otherwise it's very obvious about what you get.

It's worth mentioning that my playthrough of Ghostwire lasted about 10 and a half hours. That's with a smattering of side missions completed as well, but mostly just sprinting through the latter half of the game in an effort to finish it. With all the side missions complete it's probably closer to 20 hours. And with collectables? Oof, goodness knows. In an age when games are always getting longer and more expansive, it was nice to be able to get through this in a couple of days.

I missed a lot of side missions, but honestly, they're not hugely memorable. When you're given these quests, they're from a celestial mass of blue essence in the vague shape of a human. You can't see that they're sad or annoyed or really… anything at all. You could get some cool little stories from these adventures but they're mostly along the lines of "I died and I have a regret" or "this part of the city had something wrong with it, go fight some enemies and cleanse it of bad energy".

I also experienced occasional performance issues here and there. Heavy stuttering, in particular, would happen when a fight was getting particularly messy. Additionally when I played the game on a close to brand-new laptop there were some strange latency issues between the trackpad and the game, and even heavier stuttering and asset loading issues. On my main PC, however, neither of these problems applied. 

Ghostwire: Tokyo is the best PlayStation 3 game I've played in years. It's like a good Japanese interpretation of the Infamous games. It's like you've got a ghost-based Watch Dogs or neon injected Bioshock. Ghostwire has the spirit of these older action games in bucketfuls and, though it's by no means perfect, it's like a glass of Coke after a long walk in the sun. Water might be better for you, but you want to indulge in something sugary and sweet despite the million health warnings. Though there are better games than Ghostwire in terms of theme, horror and graphics, this is just uncomplicated fun. 

Imogen has been playing games for as long as she can remember but finally decided games were her passion when she got her hands on Portal 2. Ever since then she’s bounced between hero shooters, RPGs, and indies looking for her next fixation, searching for great puzzles or a sniper build to master. When she’s not working for PC Gamer, she’s entertaining her community live on Twitch, hosting an event like GDC, or in a field shooting her Olympic recurve bow.

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Ghostwire: Tokyo Review

Tango Gameworks' Ghostwire: Tokyo builds a paranormal mystery in a grounded setting but loses some of its shine in its pacing and combat.

When Tango Gameworks and Shinji Mikami revealed that Ghostwire: Tokyo was an action-adventure game instead of a survival horror game, it was understandable that their fans would be confused. Mikami played a big role on Resident Evil and Dino Crisis during his time at Capcom, while Tango’s only other series in its library is The Evil Within . In fact, Ghostwire: Tokyo was first pitched as The Evil Within 3 , and parts of that horror element are still evident in its DNA.

Ghostwire: Tokyo jumps right into the action, showing players how people all over the city quickly disappear, and deadly, otherworldly Visitors begin to flood in alongside a dangerous fog. KK, now without any corporeal body, must possess someone to defend the city, and he attempts to take over Akito’s body. Obviously, this is not a great way for any two people to meet, and the growth of Akito and KK’s relationship is one of the best parts of the game.

RELATED: How to Play Ghostwire: Tokyo Early

The most impressive aspect of Ghostwire: Tokyo is the city itself. At times it truly feels like players are walking down the streets of Tokyo, with enough hidden secrets to make general exploration simple fun. It’s so well done and so realistic, in fact, that players could forget they were playing a game filled with horrific monsters, accidentally walking up on one before they realize it isn’t just some little girl on the street.

Although Ghostwire: Tokyo is not classified as an open-world game, it certainly feels like it at times. Players have to clean Torii gates in order to open up new sections of the map, pushing back the deadly fog and unlocking fast travel. This reveals new points of interest, side quests, and more. Soon enough, the map is covered with things to check out and do, and while that’s not necessarily good or bad, its map design certainly feels like a Ubisoft open-world game. It's not to the same scale as recent entries in Assassin's Creed or Far Cry , as Ghostwire: Tokyo has a much smaller map , but it populates that map in a very similar way.

While there are supernatural elements, flying Tengu, enemies, and corruption all around Tokyo, it never makes the city feel unbelievable. The supernatural and the realistic are all balanced, and this shines through when players are exploring the world. Indeed, there are several times when players are out in the open city or in close, damp, and slightly terrifying locations—abandoned parking lots, tight hallways, eerie hospitals—and the scariest aspect isn’t Ghostwire: Tokyo 's Visitor designs , but the world itself.

Make no mistake, Tango Gameworks’ experience in enemy design shines through, and these Visitors are disturbing in unique ways . These otherworldly creatures don’t simply play on players' fears, as Tango’s approach has been described as the “unordinary lurking in the ordinary.” Many of these enemies can seem safe from a distance, even mistakable for generic NPCs, but it’s when they turn on players that they really become terrifying. Not to mention, even when players face off with these enemies, it may take an encounter or two before they realize all the detail packed into these enemies.

There are about 10 enemy types in Ghostwire: Tokyo , with many of them having stronger, differently-colored variations in the game. There are also a couple of boss fights in the game, and the strength of each of these goes back to the enemy design. Facing these enemies can be fun because of how they are designed, but combat-wise, players may burn out quickly.

Ghostwire: Tokyo ’s combat is best described as a flashy sprint, not a marathon. As Akito acclimates to KK’s spirit in his body, he gains access to three combat abilities. Players must collect ether to recharge these abilities, but they can either shoot a quick and powerful air blast, a fire-spear/bomb, or a wide water attack. There’s also a spirit bow, which KK can use when/if he gets separated from Akito, as well as a few talismans. Ghostwire: Tokyo will occasionally split KK and Akito up, as part of combat in severance attacks or for story reasons, and this really makes the horror of the Visitors stand out. But, nonetheless, everything players will do combat-wise will be done by Chapter 2, and it’s just on repeat from there.

RELATED: Ghostwire: Tokyo Devs Discuss 'Slit-Mouthed Woman' Urban Legends

With the way Akito uses his hands to form these attacks, there is a certain wow factor when first seeing Ghostwire: Tokyo ’s gameplay . It feels like it has a lot of places it can go, but in a short time, it becomes spamming one attack as quickly as possible or using the strongest attack against a strong enemy. There’s not much to the combat, and the boss fights—which offer the best combat sequences of the game—don’t do too much to build on it.

A lot of Ghostwire: Tokyo also focuses on Akito’s hands, as they are the only source of power in combat, but they are also used to cleanse Torii gates, seal away bad spirits, and more. There are a lot of inspired flourishes with Akito’s hands, depending on what the player is doing, but it’s something where that novelty burns out quickly.

Perhaps one reason for this quick burnout in the game is the pacing of the story. The first two chapters jump straight into the story, laying it all out on the line for Akito and KK and showcasing the sheer potential of its combat and story, but a lot of it doesn’t follow through. Around the midway point of the game, the story comes to a standstill after a massive event, and it doesn’t really add up.

The beginning and the end of Ghostwire: Tokyo are intense, action-oriented, and still terrifying, but everything in between feels less driven. It’s during these times when the side quests in Ghostwire: Tokyo are actually much more interesting than the story. Since there are no living, breathing NPCs in the game, the approach here isn't generally what fans would expect from side quests. Players are often helping spirits resolve things that keep them from moving on, and the game can put players in absolutely terrifying locations, like a hotel where no one leaves alive.

Indeed, Ghostwire: Tokyo is at its best when it allows the player to go full-blown Spirit Detective, which occurs mostly in the side quests. Players will sometimes have to find doorways hidden by Yokai, solve a quick little mystery, chase spirit weasels around, bring certain spirits together, drive them apart, save them, and far more. There are, of course, more traditional side quests in the game—there’s a series of “fetch quests” called requests where players must seek out items for a friendly cat Yokai named Nekomata —but the stories that embrace the Japanese folklore are the absolute best.

Ultimately, Ghostwire: Tokyo's world-building, Japanese folklore , and character dynamics are engaging, but the pacing and combat weigh down the middle section.

Ghostwire: Tokyo releases March 21 for PC and PS5. Game Rant was provided a PS5 code for the purposes of this review.

MORE: Ghostwire: Tokyo Interview with Tango Gameworks and Shinji Mikami

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  • Tokyo's population has vanished, and deadly supernatural forces prowl the streets
  • Use an arsenal of elemental abilities to unravel the truth behind the disappearance and save Tokyo
  • Face the unknown, uncover the truth and save the city
  • The Deluxe Edition includes Streetwear Outfit Pack, Shinobi Outfit & Kunai Weapon, and Ghostwire: Tokyo Game
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Face the unknown, uncover the truth and save the city Tokyo is overrun by deadly supernatural forces, perpetrated by a dangerous occultist, causing Tokyo’s population to vanish in an instant. Ally with a powerful spectral entity on their quest for vengeance and master a powerful arsenal of abilities to unravel the dark truth behind the disappearance as you FACE THE UNKNOWN in Ghostwire: Tokyo. A beautifully haunted Tokyo Explore a unique vision of Tokyo twisted by a supernatural presence. From its ultra-modern cityscape to its traditional temples and narrow alleyways, discover a hauntingly beautiful city teeming with Yokai - vengeful spirts spirits that prowl the streets. Discover iconic landmarks like Shibuya Crossing and Tokyo Tower, stunningly rendered with incredible detail and built to take advantage of next-generation technology. Experience the city frozen in time when the city’s population disappeared, and travel to the surreal underworld on your quest to save your family. Devastating Elemental Abilities Wield a combination of upgradeable elemental powers and ghost-hunting skills to combat the supernatural threat. Use your ethereal abilities to ascend to the to the top of Tokyo's skyline and soar over the streets to discover new missions or even get the drop on your enemies.

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GhostWire: Tokyo

GhostWire: Tokyo (2022)

A massive paranormal event causes the sudden disappearance of 99% of the population while spirits from Japanese folklore storm Tokyo. Players will harness paranormal abilities to solve the m... Read all A massive paranormal event causes the sudden disappearance of 99% of the population while spirits from Japanese folklore storm Tokyo. Players will harness paranormal abilities to solve the mystery of the disappearances and save the city. A massive paranormal event causes the sudden disappearance of 99% of the population while spirits from Japanese folklore storm Tokyo. Players will harness paranormal abilities to solve the mystery of the disappearances and save the city.

  • Kenji Kimura
  • Syoji Ishimine
  • Seiji Ebihara
  • Kensuke Nishi
  • Kazuhiko Inoue
  • 3 User reviews
  • 8 Critic reviews
  • 6 nominations

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  • Apr 1, 2022
  • March 25, 2022 (United States)
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Video Game / Ghostwire: Tokyo

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Ghostwire: Tokyo ( ゴーストワイヤー:東京 ) is a 2022 supernatural horror action-adventure video game developed by Tango Gameworks (the studio behind The Evil Within ) and published by Bethesda .

Shibuya, Tokyo has been struck by a mysterious fog that spirits away anybody and everybody caught in it, and allows spirits known as " Visitors " to roam the streets. As a result, Shibuya has become a ghost town. The player controls Akito, a recently-deceased man who is brought back to life by the spirit "KK", who deems him able to solve this crisis...

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  • Action Survivor : Akito is just a normal human without being attached to KK and the few times they're separated he's unable to use Elemental Weaving and other skills. However, he's relatively athletic, can still use the bow and talismans, and can even do quick purges when sneaking up on enemies. He even manages to fight and defeat Ko Omote after being separated from KK.
  • Always Chaotic Evil : The Visitors are all hostile and attack Akito on sight. Ultimately they could hardly be otherwise, given that they are entirely formed from negative feelings.
  • You lose your magic powers near the end of the second chapter, and have to rely on your bow. You will find plenty of arrows lying around.
  • You get a small increase in maximum HP every time that you use a healing item. If you aren't very good at combat you'll probably be healing a lot, and will gain HP faster.
  • Do you hate Timed Missions ? There is an option to "Disable Time Limits." Disables the time limits for events that would normally have a clock ticking down.
  • Don't want to search every street and alley in a sector for the Jizo Statues that increase your attack? Just put 500 coins into the collection box at a full shrine (this rapidly becomes a trivial sum), pray to find a statue, and you will receive a map marker.
  • Got a new Relic in your pocket to trade for Meika, yet you can't remember which collector Nekomata it was supposed to go to? Just look for whichever yellow paw icon on the map has a checkmark in place of the fast-travel icon.
  • Anyone Can Die : Everybody you meet, be it a main character, side character or villain, dies or is dead already. The only plot-related survivors are Akito and some folks from outside the barrier he only heard of. Oh, and animals are okay too.
  • Apocalypse How : Class 0 . The Fog that consumes Shibuya turns (almost) all of the humans there into disembodied souls, with Youkai and Visitors wandering about in their place. If the Big Bad's plan to use the collective souls of Shibuya to permanently open the barrier between the Living world and the Underworld succeeds, it may well upgrade to a Class 4 or 5 .
  • Big Brother Instinct : Akito's main goal throughout the game is to rescue his sister Mari. Even after barely surviving a car crash, being forcibly possessed by KK, and seeing the localized apocalypse, his first thought is to fight his way to Mari's hospital room.
  • Big Brother Mentor : KK shows shades of this the longer the story goes. Many scenes have him tell Akito he's proud of him, how he's getting better at controlling their powers, and that he's doing really good despite everything.
  • Bittersweet Ending : Hannya is stopped and all the souls he trapped are free to return to life. However, Rinko and KK pass on and Mari dies in Akito's arms despite his best efforts. Still, Akito manages to make peace with her before she passes and resolves to live his life to the fullest despite the tragedies he's faced. He also promises KK to tell his wife and son that he never stopped fighting till the end and leaves the underworld to do just that.
  • The Blank : A lack of facial features is a running theme with the Visitors, either lacking them, being always concealed behind masks or hoods or being straight up headless. This likely reflects that they are not really people so much as Anthropomorphic Personifications of misery.
  • Bloodless Carnage : Given that most of the enemies are spiritual entities this is generally the rule. The Visitors just disintergrate with little fuss when destroyed.
  • Blow You Away : The Air element features weak, but rapid-fire and fast attacks, useful for hitting weak, unarmored enemies and as a general-purpose damage dealer thanks to its high ammo count.
  • Brought Down to Normal : Whenever KK is separated from Akito he returns to being a normal human with none of his Elemental Weaving abilities. This happens again in the ending when KK passes on and we see that Akito's Mark of the Supernatural has disappeared.
  • Cats Are Magic : The Nekomata who act as the game's shopkeepers and are portrayed as two-tailed, floating cats. Also the more normal cats wandering Shibuya can be conversed with using KK's power and several of them have useful insight into the supernatural goings on around them.
  • Contractual Boss Immunity : Aim Assist does not work reliably on bosses and elite enemies. It especially does not work on Sanguine Dancers, which are airborne and highly mobile.
  • Contrived Coincidence : Akito just happened to get into an accident in the intro, thus allowing KK to possess him, and he also happens to be the older brother of the girl Hannya wants to use as his Living Macguffin . KK states that Akito has the 'affinity' and that Hannya might be connected to the accident but it's never really brought up again.
  • Colour-Coded for Your Convenience : Most ghosts are a gentle blue but the corrupted and hostile specters are Red and Black and Evil All Over .
  • Cursed with Awesome : Hannya's experiments are the reason KK, and by extension Akito, have Elemental Powers among other things. KK sounds infuriated when he brings it up and Akito would really rather not have to fight spirits and just have his sister back.
  • Damsel in Distress : Akito's sister Mari is kidnapped by Hannya shortly after Akito's possession and his main goal throughout the story is to rescue her.
  • Elemental Powers : Akito, and by extension KK, mostly fight the Visitors using elementally-themed powers.
  • Empty Piles of Clothing : They're everywhere, since Shibuya was incredibly crowded before everyone had their physical body forcibly turned spiritual.
  • Finishing Move : When an enemy is stunned after taking enough damage, their core is exposed, allowing Akito to rip it out and instantly kill it, at range or up close. The former leaves him stationary for a few moments, potentially leaving him open to attacks, while the latter is faster but getting up close to the enemy can be risky in the first place.
  • Fire-Forged Friends : Akito and KK start off barely tolerating each other and only work together due to mutual goals. As the game goes on the two form more of a bond and their banter changes with KK being proud and supportive while Akito tries to understand KK's history and circumstances.
  • First-Episode Resurrection : Akito dies in a vehicular accident, but is brought back to like thanks to KK deeming him available and useful.
  • Most side missions inside buildings take place on the fourth floor as well, nothing good ever lingers there.
  • The Ghost : Of KK's friends/team members from Prelude , only Rinko is met in person and Erika appears as a vision during her boss fight . The other two members are never met (although Akito does find a picture of them and Ed's voice is heard in prerecorded messages a few times). Justified since the still-alive members left Shibuya prior to the dome being erected and they can't get in till it's gone.
  • Hyperactive Metabolism : Your main form of healing is by consuming food and drinks. They take a few seconds to use and there's a small cooldown after eating. There's also foods infused with spectral energy that offer combat boosts in addition to healing.
  • Impaled with Extreme Prejudice : Sometimes, you'll find spirits that have large objects stabbed into them that you'll need to exorcise before you can absorb them. Said objects can include street signs, crutches, IV drip stands, railroad crossing signs, and metal girders. While the spirits don't sound like they're in too much agony over this, that could be Dissonant Serenity from being spirits in the first place.
  • Jerk with a Heart of Gold : Contrasting Akito's Nice Guy , KK tends to be blunt, rude and cynical and introduces himself by trying to forcibly take over Akito's body. Once they start getting along better, however, he shows a much more kind and supportive side and he's quick to offer help to many of the wandering spirits, which Akito points out.
  • Legacy Character : At a few points KK references another member of his supernatural-hunting group who passed on his powers to KK in a not-dissimilar situation from what happened with him and Akito. It's implied that Akito will be the third link in this chain .
  • Making a Splash : The Water element shoots out slow-moving horizontal blades, useful for dealing with tightly packed crowds of enemies, but the limited range makes it risky to use on faster or ranged enemies.
  • Malevolent Masked Man : The Big Bad is a nameless individual that KK has a grudge against, identified only by the Hannya mask he wears and giving no personal moniker himself. He's accompanied by 3 similarly masked and suited individuals that serve as his Co-Dragons . These are eventually unmasked throughout the story to reveal they are the possessed bodies of Hannya's wife and daughter, which he is fine putting in mortal peril because he only puts value in the human soul, and seeks to liberate humanity from their 'earthly prisons' . The final one, which is fought several times and serves as more of a direct Dragon for Hannya, is revealed to be KK's original body, apparently Reforged into a Minion to mock him .
  • Mood Whiplash : One that can happen immediately on starting the game . The opening Bethesda logo can be interrupted by an Ominous Visual Glitch and glimpses of the game's Big Bad , Hannya... followed immediately by the Tango Gameworks logo, where a cartoony snail does something silly.
  • Nice Guy : Akito starts off noticeably panicked at first, which is understandable given his circumstances, but once he adjusts to the situation he's happy to help KK rescue spirits and Yokai in distress.
  • Night Parade of One Hundred Demons : A variation - as the map opens up more, a parade of youkai will be wandering around. If the player isn't careful, Akito can wind up caught in one and will have to fight off several waves, so it's best recommended to either run away or go very high up if you're not feeling confident.
  • Whenever Akito dies we're shown his body fading from existence before the game restarts.
  • This is also how the Visitors and hostile Yokai go out, just fading out of existence.
  • No Name Given : The man in the Hannya mask is referred to as such for the entire game, and his real name is never given.
  • A black-and-white diamond appears over anything collectable when you're a few metres away.
  • Aura Vision highlights anything within range that is useful or hostile.
  • You will hear a meow when you're very close to objects of interest to Nekomata , even if you aren't looking at them.
  • You can level up your ranged attacks at Jizō Statues. You can hear a chime when you're very close, even through walls.
  • Not Quite Dead : In the beginning, KK's attempts to possess any of the living humans in the area fail, forcing him to apparently use Akito's deceased corpse nearby instead. However, Akito still retains his consciousness despite his possession, something KK wasn't expecting, noting that the young man was Only Mostly Dead , which is why he can fight KK for control over his physical body.
  • Paper Talisman : There's consumable ofuda that Akito can buy from the various nekomata shopkeepers and later use them during combat, like a Stun Talisman that can create a small dome of electricity to stun the Visitors and kuchisake-onna. There's also ofuda seen stuck on doors that Akito has to unseal, and then there's also ofuda seen in his hand when he either performs an up-close finishing move of grabbing the core or is doing a back-attack on stronger enemies.
  • Playing with Fire : The Fire element features incredible burst damage in an area, capable of wrecking armored or shielded enemies, at the cost of needing to be charged up and having limited ammo. It only takes one shot for most enemies or groups of them, but you had better make sure that shot doesn't miss .
  • Pretty Boy : Akito is slender and has far softer features than the rougher KK.
  • Post-Modern Magik : Payphones are used to store freed spirits safely until they're restored later on, Rinko also uses a payphone to transfer all she knows — as a ghost — to Akito, and a motorcycle enhanced with anti-Otherworld modifications is used to enter the Very Definitely Final Dungeon .
  • The collectible relics include Joseph Oda's glasses found in the Morite Shrine district, and Stefano Valentini's camera found in the Shiroyama Shrine district.
  • A Relic you can find in the Namita Shrine district is a Cursed Videotape .
  • During the "Giants" mission in Chapter 4, one of the Relics you can find in the parking garage are red shoes .
  • A post-launch mission awards you with the Fallout 4 vault suit.
  • Speaks Fluent Animal : KK and by extension Akito can use his powers to communicate with animals, both the supernatural and the regular kind.
  • The Straight and Arrow Path : Akito has access to a bow which can fire special arrows that can deal tremendous damage to targets. If you happen to be out of Ether for your normal abilities, it can also act as an emergency weapon though it's far from ideal, thanks to the limited ammo and the cost of replacing them. Whenever Akito is separated from KK it's also his main means of attack.
  • One enemy only moves when you look away, e.g. to check a clue or leave the room. You can easily knock it down, but it gets up again when you look away. Think a Weeping Angel , only as a science-lab anatomy mannequin with half of its face showing the muscle and bone underneath the skin. Thankfully it's not at all realistic-looking.
  • Another enemy deals continuous damage when you look at it . Good luck doing anything other than sneaking past that one.
  • Symbiotic Possession : Akito and KK establish this despite their rough start. The few times they're separated, such as in specific story events or by certain enemy attacks, they're quick to try and reunite and are much weaker separated than when they're together.
  • Teeth-Clenched Teamwork : At the beginning after KK possess Akito, for obvious reasons where Akito isn't happy of being possessed by KK and KK not being able to be in physically control most of the time. The two later get over the "Teeth Clenched" part, evolving into a genuine partnership.
  • You can find an item called "Suspicious Flyer," which invites people to call Venusian UFOs, and advertises "Free course on making telepathy hats (bring your own tinfoil)."
  • A wearable tinfoil hat is a reward for collecting all of the items for the Occult Nekomata .
  • Tokyo Is the Center of the Universe : The game is set in Tokyo's Shibuya ward, where the fog has turned this part of the city into a ghost town.
  • Tokyo Tower : The final confrontation with Hannya takes place at the Tokyo Tower. The tower avoids damage, because the boss battle takes place in a parallel dimension, accessed via the main deck.
  • Training the Gift of Magic : Akito has a naturally high etheric affinity, and while he can't use Etheric Weaving, he apparently learns how to use ether to charge his arrows, perform sneak exorcisms, absorb spirits into katashiro, and sense whether or not an enemy is aware of his presence, judging by the things he can do without KK in his body.
  • Trash of the Titans : The "The Hoarder's House" quest involves Akito and KK going into a house that's filled wall to wall with trash and has flies buzzing inside. The house is possessed by the specter of a greedy hoarder who wants everything, including the protagonists, to the point it attracts Visitors. After dealing with them, Akito and KK banish the hoarder's ghost.
  • You have the ability to feed stray dogs on the streets, earning you their gratitude and a thank you gift in the form of hidden treasure.
  • Some of the sidequests involve helping trapped spirits move on by fulfilling their dying wishes or helping give them some closure for the problems that plagued them in life. For example, you can help an elderly man's soul pass by giving him one last chance to see the cherry blossom trees bloom.
  • Ittan-momen: Floating long strips of cloth that can be found above rooftops. However, they don't wrap themselves around Akito's neck — Akito just chases them down for their magatama.
  • Jizō (jizo): Jizo statues with their iconic bibs (although not always in red) can be found throughout Shibuya to increase Akito's ether capacity.
  • Kamaitachi : While they still keep their speedy reputation because you have to chase them down, they don't actually hurt Akito with their scythes, although apparently they were doing so to other, less magical citizens prior to everyone vanishing.
  • Kappa : Like their real world mythical counterparts, they steal a human's shirikodama. Akito can catch one by luring it in with cucumbers that can be bought from the nekomata.
  • Karakasa : Karakasa-kozo, where Akito has to sneak up behind them or they'll run away if they spot him.
  • Kodama: Little seed-like beings that nurture trees, they are defenceless against Visitors looking to take their power and need Akito's help to protect them.
  • Kuchisake-onna: In this game they're Visitors rather than youkai or ghosts. Wearing a surgical mask and carrying a large pair of shears, they're one of the more dangerous Visitors to fight while running about, especially on Tatari Mode (a mode where you don't gain experience points), since they run rather fast and hit hard.
  • Nekomata : Nekomata are the shopkeepers, where Akito can buy various supplies from them. Some have optional item requests that'll earn a good amount of money if Akito goes through the extra trouble of picking up the items.
  • Nurikabe : These living walls are naturally hiding inside apartments and homes, blocking rooms or passages that can lead to extra collectibles.
  • Oni : In a portrayal surprisingly lacking in aggression the Oni seem mostly concerned with making friends among the city's dogs and are being hunted for their power by the Visitors. If Akito defends their dog buddies they'll grant that power to him willingly.
  • Rokurokubi: Other than the traditional long neck, these harmless rokurokubi also are carrying a lantern in their mouths. They're found throughout Shibuya where Akito basically follows them to an endpoint. They can lead him into ambushes by Visitors but this is probably by accident.
  • Tanuki : In full shape-shifting glory, where it's part of a sidequest to find them at the request of a tanuki boss. They're easily identifiable by their tails when disguised.
  • Tengu : They basically act as grappling points to get up to the many skyscraper rooftops of Shibuya (and that unwillingly, although they don't seem to mind much either), but that's it for their presence.
  • Zashiki-warashi : They're found inside apartments and homes, and will happily grant a magatama after an offering of shio senbei (fried rice crackers) is made at their altars.
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Ghostwire: Tokyo

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  • 2022 ( Windows )
  • 2022 ( PlayStation 5 )
  • 2023 ( Windows Apps )
  • 2023 ( Xbox Series )
  • 2023 ( Xbox Cloud Gaming )
  • Bethesda Softworks LLC
  • Tango Gameworks
  • #108 on PlayStation 5
  • #4,241 on Windows

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Description official descriptions

Ghostwire Tokyo is a first-person action game set in a supernatural version of Tokyo, Japan. The game's story revolves around a mysterious event that causes most of the city's population to disappear and the player character's mission to uncover the truth behind this event and stop the supernatural forces behind it.

Gameplay focuses on combat, exploration and puzzle solving. Players use a variety of abilities and weapons to defeat supernatural enemies, while also exploring the city and uncovering the truth behind the mysterious event. The game features a dynamic world, with different areas changing and evolving as the player progresses through the story.

Distinctive gameplay elements include the ability to exorcise spirits and gain powers from defeated enemies. The game's world is filled with hidden secrets and hidden paths to uncover, adding an element of exploration to the gameplay. Additionally, the game features a highly atmospheric visual style, with a strong focus on supernatural elements and the mysterious atmosphere of Tokyo.

  • 3D Engine: Unreal Engine 4
  • Gameplay feature: Pettable animals
  • Ghostwire: Tokyo series
  • Middleware: FaceFX
  • Middleware: SpeedTree
  • Middleware: Wwise
  • Setting: City - Tokyo

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Average score: 78% (based on 28 ratings)

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Game added March 25th, 2022. Last modified December 29th, 2023.

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Ghostwire: Tokyo review

Ghostwire: Tokyo review

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Near the start of Ghostwire: Tokyo is one of the most stirring things I’ve seen in a horror game in years. We are in Shibuya, at the famous Scramble Crossing, which, according to one report in 2016, hosts three thousand pedestrians per green light, roughly every two minutes. On this particular occasion, however, the lights are down, and there isn’t another soul in sight. But we are not alone. A serene procession of figures ghost into view, warbling out of a white-blue fog, as if they had bled into our world from a videotape. This is Hyakki Yakō, or, as one character describes it, “the demon parade.” I stumbled across it a handful of times, and the spectacle barely lasts the length of a green light, but I could only stop and stare.

The reason for this visitation is the spectral dealings of a man in a hannya mask—a traditional prop of the Japanese Noh theatre. He is referred to, by the subtitles, first as “Man in Hannya Mask,” then, with a hint of tired familiarity, as simply “Hannya.” And no wonder: his party trick—repeated a little too often—is to hack the vast digital screens looming above, the better to deliver a series of sermons. “O Vagrant souls, gather unto me,” he begins. Then, later: “I do not seek power, nor the right of rule. I seek nothing but salvation.” Unfortunately for us, this salvation entails the merging of our earthly plane with the underworld, knocking through the separating wall without planning permission, and paying absolutely no heed to the rubric of building control. In order to do it, he must harvest the spirits of the living; hence the clothes that litter the streets, as people were yanked clean out of them and yoked to a drifting purgatory.

One line of inquiry that haunts Ghostwire: Tokyo , from beginning to end, is whether or not it is a horror. Let us inspect the evidence. We get a deluge of monsters, many of them culled from the crevices of Japanese horror movies; one such ghoul takes the form of a girl in a yellow raincoat, in a nod to the spectre that leaked through Hideo Nakata’s Dark Water. At one point, we patrol the corridors of a hospital, as we did, on several occasions, in the Silent Hill games—plus, to drive home the homage the speaker in the PlayStation 5 controller peals with radio static at the approach of your foes. And the end credits inform us that the Piano Sonata No.14, by Ludwig van Beethoven, otherwise known as the Moonlight Sonata, was performed by one Shinji Mikami, who serves as executive producer.

Ghostwire: Tokyo

This is not a bad association to have. Mikami, who directed Resident Evil and its remake, along with Resident Evil 4 , is more responsible than most game developers for the quickening and cooling of our blood. And he has long had a lunar obsession. That same piece played through the halls of the Spencer mansion, in the first Resident Evil , and the last game he directed, The Evil Within , featured repeat listenings of Clair de Lune, by Debussy. The new game includes not just Beethoven but an angered moon, hanging over the city like a lone, bloodshot eye. But what does it survey? Ghostwire: Tokyo is a playground, an open world of collectibles, friction-free traversal, and superpowered combat. There aren’t so much scares here as moments shot through with mild jitters.

Our hero, a young fellow named Akito Izuki, is a man possessed. Not only because he is searching desperately for his sister, Mari, but because the ghost of a paranormal investigator, called KK, has taken up lodging in his body. (In fairness, Akito was unconscious when this happened, so it may be that his restive tenant can claim squatters’ rights.) Courtesy of KK, Akito is endowed with the abilites of a sorcerer; with a series of hand gestures, he is able to direct focussed bolts of bad weather at his enemies. The game is in first person, and the functions of these elemental powers fill in for the tools of a shooter; wind, for example, is akin to a pistol, with Akito cocking his fingers as though in a pretend shootout, and water, with its wide and frothing spread, recalls a shotgun. Best of all is fire, an orb of which is summoned between his palms, like a pinless and hotting grenade, before being hurled at your target and blooming into a conflagration.

The combat has crunch, helped enormously by the haptics of the PS5 controller, and your enemies are strangely frangible; you chip away at them like a bartender, hacking off chunks of ice from a block, and the colours that spew out are cocktail-bright. There are faint pangs of tension, too, in the way that space is managed. (Mikami is a master of this: think of Leon Kennedy in that rural, rust-brown hell, his periphery ploughed by slow-moving farmers while other fiends rushed him from the front.) But the skirmishes aren’t quite enough to carry Ghostwire: Tokyo to the finish. Neither, I have to say, is the story.

Ghostwire: Tokyo

Hannya, as befits his namesake, is powered by a clash of emotions. The trick of the hannya mask, onstage, is that, when viewed head-on, its wood appears carved into a malevolent grimace, but, when tilted downward, it is grained with sorrow. Sure enough, we learn that his motivation wells up from the death of his family, and his wish to see them again. The trouble is, we don’t really care. Much of the plot is delivered in hasty fashion, and fractured in its telling by the game’s structure, with its slew of optional quests. When, toward the conclusion, KK says to Akito, “So you finally learned how to open up to your family, huh?” I was happy for him, I guess, but I could only honestly concur with the “huh?”

So, why is Ghostwire: Tokyo a game you ought to play? Well, I would direct you back up to that moon. The developer, Tango Gameworks, is transfixed by its setting, and by the idea of the city as a sublunary realm, inhabited by as many people as phantoms, and figments of what might have been. Not only is it fed by the visions of other games—as in Tokyo Jungle , the place is inherited by animals, whose fur is wryly unruffled by the absence of humanity—but it depicts a city on whose sights games have feasted for decades. Check out the torii gates, which you use to expel each district’s resident evils, but which also inspired Shigeru Miyamoto, who imagined flying through them in a ship, and thus swayed the action of Star Fox . If you are a sucker for the night-coloured fantasies of Yakuza , then this is a place of necessary pilgrimage.

Most potent of all, there is a strain of urban fear running through its design—not of monsters but of the city itself as an isolating entity, rendering you unreachable. Note, in your inventory, the Gara-Kei: a flip phone, popular in Tokyo, made, we are told, “long before smartphones,” and whose functions and services “unique to Japan were surpassing global standards at the time.” What if teeming progress means getting cut off? (No wonder you rescue stranded spirits using public phone booths, ferrying them away by dialling an outside line—the act that gives the game its title). This same fear was probed by Tetsuya Nomura, whose game The World Ends with You , also set in the hyper-fashionable Shibuya, centred on the city’s restless youth, filled its streets with wraiths, and dared us to tell the difference, in the eyes of its wider society. It’s no surprise that my favourite thing to do in Ghostwire: Tokyo is to grapple up to its rooftops and glide over its woes. That, the game seems to suggest, is what everyone here is in danger of doing. You begin to sympathise with Hannya. All he wants is to break through.

Developer: Tango Gameworks

Publisher:  Bethesda Softworks

Available on: PlayStation 5 [reviewed on], PC

Release Date:  March 25, 2022

To check what a review score means from us,  click here .

Ghostwire: Tokyo

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The antagonist of Ghostwire: Tokyo stands in front of an arch, and is backlit by neon lights

2022 was a great year for video game releases — so great, in fact, that a game like Ghostwire: Tokyo , an altogether good game brimming with character and compelling ideas, may have been relegated to many players’ backlogs. I know that was the case for me. However, I spent much of the 2022 holiday season exploring Tango Gameworks’ ghost-infested facsimile of Japan’s bustling metropolis, and I had a blast. And until Nov. 2, you can download the game for free on PC, provided you have an Amazon Prime subscription.

An open-world action-adventure, Ghostwire: Tokyo marked Tango’s first departure from its excellent The Evil Within series since its founding in 2010. However, the studio’s survival-horror roots are still on full display. Which isn’t a surprise, considering the studio was founded by Resident Evil director/producer Shinji Mikami .

You spend most of the game exploring the haunted alleyways, rooftops, and gardens of the titular city, which has been engulfed in a malignant fog that turns civilians into disembodied spirits. Ghostwire may be known for its hand-based magical combat, but it’s absolutely dripping with ethereal, macabre atmosphere at every turn.

In terms of scale, Ghostwire is infinitely more digestible than the gargantuan open worlds that defined the video games of the 2010s. It’s more akin to the recent Assassin’s Creed Mirage , which focuses on a single city, and thus, gets more mileage out of every square yard than, say, Assassin’s Creed Valhalla . My favorite recurring quest-type in Ghostwire tasked me with parsing through the former lives of Tokyoites-turned-spirits. One needed me to find a keepsake that they had hidden in the recesses of their home, while others asked me to cleanse their house of a mischievous demon, the better to grant them peace. As opposed to the frantic nature of The Evil Within 2 , Ghostwire is an aggressively languid game, and I loved scouring every inch of its version of Tokyo for the next somber short story.

Ghostwire has its frustrations. Its combat, while initially flashy, is basically a first-person shooter in disguise. Furthermore, its character upgrades don’t do much to alleviate the martial monotony; several of its perks merely decrease the time it takes to pick up certain items. But what it lacks in mechanical innovation, it more than makes up for in ghostly ambience and supernatural vibes. It’s the ideal game to play when you’re not in the mood for anything particularly demanding, and it’s also a great game to celebrate Halloween season. And, again, it’s free on PC for Prime subscribers — along with a handful of other games — until Nov. 2.

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Ghostwire: Tokyo was one of the most under-rated Game Pass additions of the year

Though met with middling reviews on release, Ghostwire's quiet persistence has won some hearts.

This one's a bit of a cheat for me because I actually did play Ghostwire: Tokyo when it released in 2022; I played lots of it, in fact, and absolutely did put it on my formally submitted, finger-on-the-pulse GOTY list last year. But nevertheless it's been as much a 2023 game for me personally as it was a 2022 game, and so I couldn't fairly do a round-up of my year in games without it.

Ghostwire: Tokyo is a massive beast. It's the game that led me to the conclusion that everyone, no matter how averse to massive open worlds in general, has it in their hearts to love at least one Ubisoft-like overwhelming map, and Ghostwire is mine. There are dozens of little markers on that map, and I must have them all! I wouldn't want to miss a single cool ghost, or friendly oni, or whatever else the haunted streets of Shibuya chooses to throw at me today.

There's an undeniable element of guilt at play here, because a year ago I placed Ghostwire: Tokyo in only second place on my GOTY list, whereas my continued fascination with it throughout 2023 proves that it really should have been in the #1 slot all along. At the time it was a tough call between Ghostwire and another game, and I was maybe being a little bit tactical when I declared the latter my favourite of the year. And in fairness it had a solid claim to be, but to tell you the truth, it didn't stick with me into 2023 the way I'd expected it to; I've certainly yet to be tempted into a replay. Whereas over the course of the same year, even around everything else I've had distracting me, I've enthusiastically put a couple dozen more hours into my attempt to 100% Ghostwire: Tokyo.

ghostwire video game

So yes, on a personal level this one's a little bit of a mulligan. But there's another reason why Ghostwire: Tokyo genuinely deserves some 2023 recognition, and it's that Xbox Series X/S players actually got access to the game for the first time this spring. Ghostwire launched on PC and PlayStation 5 in 2022, but had a year of console exclusivity on the latter; and, even though I'm not in possession of a current-gen Xbox, for me its arrival on the system was nevertheless very exciting.

The Spider's Thread update that rolled out across all systems when Ghostwire hit Xbox was my most-anticipated DLC release of the year (I can feel the side-eye from Phantom Liberty when I say that, but it's true!) — and it did not disappoint. I'd've paid good money to spend a few extra hours spiritually cleansing that haunted middle school and its surrounding district if Tango had come out with it as a paid add-on, but — perhaps due to those interesting licensing shenanigans that caused PlayStation to briefly host their potentially-last-ever Bethesda exclusives — they gave it away for free instead. And the boon is even greater if you're a Game Pass subscriber, since Ghostwire has been included on the service since its Xbox launch.

Petting the dog in Ghostwire: Tokyo

Obviously, Ghostwire: Tokyo has hardly been ignored by players this year: the game celebrated six million players back in September, undoubtedly helped along by Game Pass. But it's had a weird trajectory as a game that launched on the back of Elden Ring to middling reviews, and much of the affection that seems to have built up towards it has been quietly accumulating in the background with little attention drawn to it. And if my experience is anything to go by, then Ghostwire: Tokyo is a game that deserves the time it takes to really grow on you.

What games did you finally get around to playing in 2023 only to find that they were among the highlights of your year? Let us know in the comments!

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Ghostwire Tokyo Available for Free on Epic Games Store for 24 Hours

Posted: December 25, 2023 | Last updated: December 25, 2023

In a delightful holiday surprise, the popular first-person action-horror game Ghostwire Tokyo, developed by Tango Gameworks and published by Bethesda, is free on the Epic Games Store. This limited-time offer allows gamers to download and keep the game forever at no cost. 

Ghostwire Tokyo offers a unique blend of eerie supernatural elements, Doctor Strange-like magic, and an open-world Tokyo setting that promises an engaging gaming experience.

Act fast – 24-hour free download window

Starting now and running until December 25th at 8 am PT, gamers can grab Ghostwire Tokyo for free. This time-limited promotion allows players to immerse themselves in the mystic and haunting world of Tokyo’s spirit-filled streets.

Ghostwire Tokyo takes players on an immersive first-person action-horror adventure through Tokyo’s captivating and enigmatic streets. Players gradually acquire supernatural abilities like those in Doctor Strange, creating an action-packed, spellbinding experience. As you explore the game’s intricate open world, you’ll face otherworldly threats and engage in fast-paced combat, all while uncovering the mysteries that shroud Tokyo.

What sets Ghostwire Tokyo apart

While Ghostwire Tokyo may not have received the attention it deserves upon its March 2022 launch, it offers a unique gaming experience that distinguishes itself from the typical open-world RPG-lite titles. The game stands out for its impressive combat mechanics and the eerie yet charming atmosphere it creates within the bustling streets of Shibuya.

The game’s combat system allows players to harness supernatural powers and engage in thrilling battles against spectral adversaries. This blend of magic and action keeps players on their toes, offering an adrenaline-pumping gaming experience. Additionally, Ghostwire Tokyo’s detailed rendition of Shibuya adds to its appeal, with its eerie and immersive atmosphere drawing players deeper into the supernatural mysteries of the game.

Ghostwire Tokyo has garnered favorable reviews from both players and critics. Our review awarded the game a solid 7/10, praising its atmospheric world and engaging combat mechanics. While the main story may exhibit some repetitiveness, the game’s side content provides plenty of opportunities for exploration and action. Ghostwire Tokyo shines when players venture into Tango Gameworks’ meticulously crafted version of Shibuya.

How to get Ghostwire Tokyo for free

To take advantage of this limited-time offer and secure your free copy of Ghostwire Tokyo, simply visit the Epic Games Store and navigate to the official Ghostwire Tokyo store page. The straightforward process grants you access to the game for a lifetime of supernatural adventures.

Ghostwire Tokyo Available for Free on Epic Games Store for 24 Hours

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IMAGES

  1. GhostWire: Tokyo

    ghostwire video game

  2. Ghostwire Tokyo's Side Missions Bring Its Supernatural Setting to Life

    ghostwire video game

  3. Ghostwire: Tokyo Is an Action/Adventure Game Rather Than Horror; Dev

    ghostwire video game

  4. Ghostwire: Tokyo hands-off gameplay preview

    ghostwire video game

  5. Ghostwire: Tokyo Release Date, Trailer and Gameplay!

    ghostwire video game

  6. First Ghostwire: Tokyo gameplay revealed, coming next year to PC and

    ghostwire video game

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  1. Ghostwire: Tokyo:ep23: the game crash

  2. Ghostwire : Tokyo

  3. Gameplay Ghostwire : Tokyo Part 3

  4. Ghostwire: Tokyo

  5. Ghostwire: Tokyo

  6. more Ghostwire Tokyo game and still going through

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  1. Ghostwire: Tokyo

    12K Share 1.1M views 1 year ago #GhostwireTokyo #Gaming #IGN Check out 18 exclusive minutes of gameplay from Ghostwire: Tokyo, the upcoming first-person action-adventure from Tango Gameworks, the...

  2. Ghostwire: Tokyo on Steam

    Community Hub Ghostwire: Tokyo Tokyo's population has vanished, and deadly supernatural forces prowl the streets. Use an arsenal of elemental abilities to unravel the truth behind the disappearance and save Tokyo. Recent Reviews: Very Positive (169) All Reviews: Very Positive (9,095) Release Date: Mar 24, 2022 Developer: Tango Gameworks Publisher:

  3. Ghostwire: Tokyo

    Ghostwire: Tokyo [a] is a 2022 action-adventure game developed by Tango Gameworks and published by Bethesda Softworks. The game released worldwide on March 25, 2022 as a one-year timed exclusive for PlayStation 5 and Windows. [2] [3] The game was later released on Xbox Series X/S on April 12, 2023, with online streaming options on the Xbox One .

  4. GhostWire: Tokyo

    45K Share 2.5M views 3 years ago https://www.playstation.com/games/gho... "Tokyo is overrun by deadly supernatural forces after 99% of the city's population vanished. ...more ...more Ghostwire:...

  5. Ghostwire: Tokyo

    FACE THE UNKNOWN IN GHOSTWIRE: TOKYO™, LAUNCHING MARCH 25, 2022 ON PLAYSTATION® 5 - PRE-ORDER TODAY FOR BONUS CONTENT (OFFERS MAY VARY) In an instant, nearl...

  6. Ghostwire: Tokyo Review

    Ghostwire: Tokyo shows us another side of this iconic urban hub, after a supernatural force leaves its streets eerily deserted.

  7. Ghostwire: Tokyo

    Ghostwire: Tokyo Spider's Thread update. Free for all players, the Spider's Thread update contains several additions to the base game, including a new area to explore, extended cutscenes, new side-missions, all-new enemies, added quality of life improvements, extra combat skills and a new roguelite "The Spider's Thread" game mode!

  8. Ghostwire: Tokyo

    Game details. Face the unknown, uncover the truth and save the city. Tokyo is overrun by deadly supernatural forces, perpetrated by a dangerous occultist, causing Tokyo's population to vanish in an instant. Ally with a powerful spectral entity on their quest for vengeance and master a powerful arsenal of abilities to unravel the dark truth ...

  9. Ghostwire: Tokyo

    Ghostwire: Tokyo is a stunning and thrilling adventure that will take you to the heart of a supernatural crisis in Japan. Learn more about the story and the gameplay of this upcoming game from the makers of The Evil Within, and download the free visual novel prelude to get ready for the action.

  10. Here's How Ghostwire: Tokyo Actually Works

    Ghostwire: Tokyo has been something of a mystery since Bethesda unveiled the game in 2019, but a new gameplay deep-dive has finally shed light on how the game actually works, including its...

  11. Ghostwire: Tokyo is creepy, thrilling, and a game that respects your time

    Ghostwire is full of some truly creepy monsters: headless schoolgirls who will charge at you with reckless abandon, horrifying humans with hair that sprouts out like gigantic spider legs, and a...

  12. Ghostwire: Tokyo review

    The Elden Rings and Sifus of the world love to hurt you, and make you learn the rules of play in brutal ways. Ghostwire: Tokyo just wants to give you cool magic hands which shoot lights at a mess ...

  13. Ghostwire: Tokyo

    A beautifully haunted Tokyo Explore a unique vision of Tokyo twisted by a supernatural presence. From its ultra-modern cityscape to its traditional temples and narrow alleyways, discover a hauntingly beautiful city teeming with Yokai - vengeful spirts spirits that prowl the streets.

  14. Ghostwire: Tokyo Review

    Tango Gameworks' Ghostwire: Tokyo builds a paranormal mystery in a grounded setting but loses some of its shine in its pacing and combat.

  15. Ghostwire Tokyo Standard Edition

    Video Game Content Included. Full game. Other. UPC. 093155175440. ... Ghostwire Tokyo Standard Edition - PlayStation 5 Ghostwire Tokyo Standard Edition - PlayStation 5 . User rating, 4.5 out of 5 stars with 277 reviews. (277) $59.99 Your price for this item is $59.99.

  16. Amazon.com: Ghostwire: Tokyo Deluxe Edition

    $19.99 & FREE Shipping Sold by: PIASPECT Ghostwire: Tokyo Deluxe Edition - PC Visit the Bethesda Store Platform : Windows 10 | Rated: Teen 4.5 21 ratings Lowest price in 30 days

  17. GhostWire: Tokyo (Video Game 2022)

    Syoji Ishimine Seiji Ebihara Stars Kensuke Nishi Kazuhiko Inoue Asami Seto See production info at IMDbPro Add to Watchlist 3 User reviews 8 Critic reviews Awards 6 nominations Videos 6 Trailer 1:44

  18. Ghostwire: Tokyo (Video Game)

    Ghostwire: Tokyo (ゴーストワイヤー:東京) is a 2022 supernatural horror action-adventure video game developed by Tango Gameworks (the studio behind The Evil Within) and published by Bethesda.. Shibuya, Tokyo has been struck by a mysterious fog that spirits away anybody and everybody caught in it, and allows spirits known as "Visitors" to roam the streets.

  19. Ghostwire: Tokyo (2022)

    Released March 24th, 2022 on Windows Credits 1,554 people Releases by Date ( by platform) 2022 ( Windows ) 2022 ( PlayStation 5 ) 2023 ( Windows Apps ) 2023 ( Xbox Series ) 2023 ( Xbox Cloud Gaming ) 3 More Publishers Bethesda Softworks LLC Developers Tango Gameworks Moby Score 7.6 #5,630 of 23.7K

  20. GHOSTWIRE TOKYO Gameplay Walkthrough FULL GAME (4K 60FPS) No ...

    Ghostwire Tokyo Gameplay Walkthrough PS5 PC No Commentary 2160p 60fps HD let's play playthrough review guide Ray TracingShowcasing all cutscenes movie editio...

  21. Ghostwire: Tokyo review

    Ghostwire: Tokyo is a playground, an open world of collectibles, friction-free traversal, and superpowered combat. There aren't so much scares here as moments shot through with mild jitters.

  22. One of 2022's most overlooked video games is free right now on PC

    Ghostwire: Tokyo, Tango Gameworks' atmospheric open-world ghost game, is free on PC for Amazon Prime subscribers until Nov. 2.

  23. Ghostwire: Tokyo was one of the most under-rated Game Pass ...

    Image credit: Bethesda/Tango Gameworks. Obviously, Ghostwire: Tokyo has hardly been ignored by players this year: the game celebrated six million players back in September, undoubtedly helped ...

  24. Ghostwire Tokyo Available for Free on Epic Games Store for 24 Hours

    In a delightful holiday surprise, the popular first-person action-horror game Ghostwire Tokyo, developed by Tango Gameworks and published by Bethesda, is free on the Epic Games Store. This...

  25. Epic Games Store's Latest Free Game Is a Hidden Gem

    The latest free game on the Epic Games Store is one that many users likely haven't heard of, but it's by no means bad. In recent weeks, the Epic Store has been on a hot streak as it has given away ...

  26. Ghostwire: Tokyo

    face the unknown in ghostwire: tokyo™, launching march 25, 2022 on playstation® 5 - pre-order today for bonus content (offers may vary) in an instant, nearl...