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  • Sailboat Guide

Hunter 240 is a 24 ′ 0 ″ / 7.3 m monohull sailboat designed by Hunter Design and built by Hunter Marine starting in 1998.

Drawing of Hunter 240

  • 1 / 27 Cheney, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 2 / 27 Ohio, US 2004 Hunter 240 $18,000 USD View
  • 3 / 27 Cheney, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 4 / 27 Cheney Reservoir, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 5 / 27 Ohio, US 2004 Hunter 240 $18,000 USD View
  • 6 / 27 Cheney, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 7 / 27 Ohio, US 2004 Hunter 240 $18,000 USD View
  • 8 / 27 Cheney, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 9 / 27 Cheney Reservoir, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 10 / 27 Ohio, US 2004 Hunter 240 $18,000 USD View
  • 11 / 27 Cheney Reservoir, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 12 / 27 Cheney, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 13 / 27 Cheney Reservoir, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 14 / 27 Cheney, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 15 / 27 Cheney Reservoir, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 16 / 27 Ohio, US 2004 Hunter 240 $18,000 USD View
  • 17 / 27 Cheney, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 18 / 27 Cheney, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 19 / 27 Ohio, US 2004 Hunter 240 $18,000 USD View
  • 20 / 27 Cheney, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 21 / 27 Cheney Reservoir, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 22 / 27 Ohio, US 2004 Hunter 240 $18,000 USD View
  • 23 / 27 Cheney, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 24 / 27 Cheney Reservoir, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 25 / 27 Ohio, US 2004 Hunter 240 $18,000 USD View
  • 26 / 27 Cheney Reservoir, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View
  • 27 / 27 Cheney Reservoir, KS, US 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD View

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

Total weight (without water ballast): 2300lbs./1043kgs. Sailing weight: 3600lbs./1632kgs.

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2004 Hunter Hunter 240 cover photo

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The Hunter 240 is a 24.08ft b&r designed by Hunter Design and built in fiberglass by Hunter Marine (USA) between 1997 and 2005.

The Hunter 240 is a light sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a day-boat. There is a very short water supply range.

Hunter 240 sailboat under sail

Hunter 240 for sale elsewhere on the web:

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Review of Hunter 240

Hunter 240

Basic specs.

Floor plan

An outboard motor is often used on this boat. In that case the boat will typically require a power of 2 - 3 hp, alternatively 46 - 55 lbs thrust if you prefer an electrical motor. Electric outboards are becoming popular for sailboat owners who want clean instant power with less noise and no exhaust fumes.

Sailing characteristics

This section covers widely used rules of thumb to describe the sailing characteristics. Please note that even though the calculations are correct, the interpretation of the results might not be valid for extreme boats.

What is Capsize Screening Formula (CSF)?

The capsize screening value for Hunter 240 is 2.49, indicating that this boat would not be accepted to participate in ocean races.

What is Theoretical Maximum Hull Speed?

The theoretical maximal speed of a displacement boat of this length is 6.3 knots. The term "Theoretical Maximum Hull Speed" is widely used even though a boat can sail faster. The term shall be interpreted as above the theoretical speed a great additional power is necessary for a small gain in speed.

The immersion rate is defined as the weight required to sink the boat a certain level. The immersion rate for Hunter 240 is about 113 kg/cm, alternatively 633 lbs/inch. Meaning: if you load 113 kg cargo on the boat then it will sink 1 cm. Alternatively, if you load 633 lbs cargo on the boat it will sink 1 inch.

Sailing statistics

This section is statistical comparison with similar boats of the same category. The basis of the following statistical computations is our unique database with more than 26,000 different boat types and 350,000 data points.

What is Motion Comfort Ratio (MCR)?

What is L/B (Length Beam Ratio)?

What is Displacement Length Ratio?

What is SA/D (Sail Area Displacement ratio)?

Maintenance

Are your sails worn out? You might find your next sail here: Sails for Sale

If you need to renew parts of your running rig and is not quite sure of the dimensions, you may find the estimates computed below useful.

This section is reserved boat owner's changes, improvements, etc. Here you might find (or contribute with) inspiration for your boat.

Do you have changes/improvements you would like to share? Upload a photo and describe what you have done.

We are always looking for new photos. If you can contribute with photos for Hunter 240 it would be a great help.

If you have any comments to the review, improvement suggestions, or the like, feel free to contact us . Criticism helps us to improve.

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Beginner's first Cruise in the Florida Keys in a Hunter 240 - Honest Feedback

hunter 240 sailboat data

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Hello All, I am a brand new "cruiser" if you will - its hard to call it cruising in my little Hunter 240. I've learned to sail on the lakes of Oklahoma. My boat is now being stored in the Florida Keys. I spent a week in February day sailing out of Bahia Honda State Park and docking at the marina their each night. I am going back at the end of May and need to know if this trip "goal" is too ambitious - or if there are obvious flaws. I am a beginner - this will be my first attempt at anchoring overnight, living aboard with limited electricity and freshwater. I look at the 240 as camping on the water - roughing it compared to most cruisers - but I'm just getting a taste of it before deciding to someday step up to a better boat. I'll be towing an inflatable "dingy" with electric trolling motor. The 240 has a 5 hp Outboard - and while not fast, handled well into 20 knot winds in February. This is my Quick "Best Case" Itinerary - if weather, wind, and willpower allow. Day One - Boat out of storage and put in at Bahia Honda for night one Day Two - Sail to Saddleback Key via Looe Key Reef & American Shoal Light (24 nm) Day Three - Sail from Saddleback to Boca Grande (24 nm via the Lakes Passage) (5 foot swing Keel) Day Four - Possibly Sail out to Marquesas Key (11 nm) Day Five - Heading East on the Gulf Side (Jewfish Basin?) (28 nm) Day Six - Continue East to Little Spanish Key (26 nm) Day Seven - East and back to Bahia Honda via the Moser channel (23 nm) Day Eight - Take the boat out, pack up and fly out that night. I'm concerned that could be too ambitious. I don't have any "wiggle room" to account for bad winds or weather. The longest distance traveled is only 28 nautical miles, but that will likely be sailing or motoring East into the wind. I could easily shorten the trip by not attempting to go all the way to Marquesas or maybe not even out to Boca Grande but just round Key West? That would allow us to take our time, fish, snorkel, etc. Obviously I'll be taking lots of fresh water and gasoline. It seems the Gulf Side has more difficult access for ice, gas, groceries - so perhaps I just return via the Hawks channel to allow for easier dingy access to restock - given my little boat doesn't have A/C, solar, refrigeration (ice chests), etc - as I said its roughing it. I greatly appreciate any advice or feedback you can offer. Thanks all!  

hunter 240 sailboat data

Schedules are the bane of cruising. I’d personally do shorter hops at first. Go where the weather takes you. Get back a day early in case weather interrupts your return and departure flight. Just take it easy! It doesn’t matter if you go one mile or twenty.  

hunter 240 sailboat data

The distances are doable, one big question for me would be, if the wind wasn't favourable and you had to rely on the Honda, would it actually keep running for long enough to complete the circuit. I would leave enough flexibility in the schedule that if the outboard quits, you can sail back and still have a good trip.  

I don't know your topography. But an idea I've used for cruising during daylight (and sometimes in deliveries depending on time available) was to have three potential destinations each day, that you wouldn't mind visiting, namely, Short, medium, and farthest. Say, 30 NM, 45, and 60, for a boat that isn't a jet. Unexpected headwind? Put in at 30 miles. Pretty good weather? 45-mile harbor. Fantastic downwind slide? Go for the 60. And you might temper it a bit if it'll be your first time at one of those ports, you don't want a "first time ever" landfall and entry and anchoring after dark if you can avoid it. And vice-versa if conditions are good and it's a familiar approach and entry and anchoring.  

hunter 240 sailboat data

We generally plan cruises with a 5-knot boat speed, figuring we want to spend five or maybe six hours en route each day. You need to include the time it takes to get in and out of the harbor too. Six hours can be a long day. As others have pointed out, it can be especially long if you're beating into wind, chop, and current. In a 24' boat, your average boat speed is not likely to get up to 5 knots. Three knots might be more realistic, what with current and things. If you wear yourself out trying to go farther, it's not fun. Shorter daily distances will still have you stopping in different places and might make the trip more enjoyable.  

hunter 240 sailboat data

The most important thing is to sail, sail, sail! 😍 Plot your route with the weather given you and sail all day, anchor in a new place each night, sleep on deck 1 night, tack a zillion times, gybe a zillion times and tuck in/shake out a zillion reefs. Learn to love your boat and tech her to listen to you by sailing every hour you can. Get back on the plane exhausted and H A P P Y ! 😍 😍 😍 😍 😍 Mark  

hunter 240 sailboat data

It's a plan, and plans can change daily, So be flexible, and enjoy what you're given. I think you'll know by the end of day three what distances you're capable of and the time it takes to cover them. I'd know where all my bailout points were, along the way. It's the beginning of the wet season. Temps are usually good. I'd plan for early departures! you definitely want to arrive in plenty of daylight, especially in the out keys if you make it. 28 miles @ 3 knots avg. is over 9 hours.  

hunter 240 sailboat data

After some time sailing you will know how many miles you can count on for a day of sailing. Don't forget to consider the tides. Some places, and some times they can make a big difference in arrival time.  

Thank you all for the thoughts - my gut feel was that seems tight. Perhaps if all goes great we could do it - or at least make Boca Grande, but smaller hops will allow more time fishing and going ashore some - and breaks from the boat might be nice with a small boat. This won’t be the last trip - don’t sour it by overdoing it. And whoever mentioned the motor failing - that’s my greatest fear! 🤞🏻  

docsooner08 said: but smaller hops will allow more time fishing and going ashore some Click to expand...

A few additional thoughts: 1) Fishing License. If you'll be fishing (anchor, drift, or entire time underway [trolling, sail or power, just get the lure behind your boat, lossen the drag on your reel and wait for a hit]), there are lots of edible fish in those parts, if you don't mind cleaning and cooking, but get yourself a fishing license (available at most bait/dive shops, $30/7days, or $47/12 months - if you're planning on going back). Ask at the bait shop about hook size, recommended lures, etc. - different stuff for bottom fishing vs. drift vs. trolling. Also, find out if there are restrictions/limits on any species (could be take only 1-2/day or nothing under x inches, or can't keep/kill any of x-species etc.). Also, if you are interesting in grabbing a lobster, ask if additional license is needed and what regulations govern the spiny delights. I think "lobster season" is late July. 2) "No A/C": temps in that area are currently low-mid 50s at night, and comfy humidity, so might not really need A/C at night. Will probably be warmer late May / early June, but probably not that much; 3) Sargassum - red tide seaweed, smelly, so maybe plan to avoid any beach where you see it piled-up, and possibly avoid swimming / snorkeling where it is thick, as it can cause skin irritation. 4) Cell Coverage. You will probably have cell coverage in many areas of your pursuit, but not everywhere. Does your boat have VHF? If not, consider getting/borrowing a hand-held, and monitor the local channel for weather/fish reports/social "say-hi" contacts, maybe ask what they are catching and what bait they are using. Always nice to know your neighbors. 5) Navigation. Do you have a chart-plotter or smart phone app? This has been discussed in other threads here. I have a couple of days experience in the Chessy using a Samsung tablet (GPS enabled) with a free app: "Argo". I am not sure about Argo's ability in the Keys, but it worked well in the Chessy. Have fun.  

hunter 240 sailboat data

I had an H24 and it was a great little boat. My wife and I took it to Lake Huron for a 10 day on the water. I would say under favorable conditions, the 25ish miles a day is doable. But I wouldn’t want to do that every day. I would set aside some down time to relax on the hook. Or use that swing keel and beach it someplace nice. I would definitely have at least a real hand held plotter, like a GPSMap device. Don’t want to have to depend on cell coverage. Also, must have at least a hand held VHF. we encountered 5’ seas one day on our voyage. The boat can handle it, but be careful and avoid anything worse. The water ballast boats are pretty tender and you will be bobbing like a cork. Have fun!  

got my annual license and have been fishing before, we’ll Miss lobster season I’m afraid. Have a handheld and the iPhone 14‘s have emergency sat phone capability - which is a nice backup. Have Navionics on A cellular ipad and iPhones - worked well in feb they run on the gps grid even outside of cell coverage - not quite as accurate as a Garmin though. But I won’t be getting more than 5-10 off shore on purpose. I heard the sargassum is gonna be nasty this year 🤞🏻. good point on the swing keel, isn’t rules against “beaching“ the boat overnight - don’t want to get caught at low tide out of the water but is that generally allowed?  

Navionics on a cell phone is just as accurate as a Garmin. Same technology. I just did a trip down there using Navionics on a phone, it will take you through any pass a conventional chart plotter will.  

Keep a good journal. Once you board the flight home, all the days, places, happenings and fish become one.  

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2000 Hunter 240

2000 hunter 240 specs.

  • Boat Type : Monohull Sailboats
  • Hull Material : Fiberglass
  • Beam : 8'3"
  • Length : 24'
  • Net Weight : 2300 lbs
  • Looking for the Boat Manual? 2000 Hunter Boats 240 Request Boat Manual Now

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Hunter 23.5

This family cruiser is innovative and has lots of room. in gusty winds, however, it is quick to stall..

Hunter Marine Corp. is noted for its slick, innovative and low-cost mass production sailers. The Hunter 23.5, new in 1992, fits the bill in all respects.

Hunter 23.5

The 23.5 was designed as a trailerable family cruiser for entry-level sailors. Like most Hunters, the boat offers lots of space in the cockpit and down below, and comes with the famous Cruise Pac, which provides just about anything a customer needs, including sails, motor, trailer, lifelines, anchor, life jackets, flares and a copy of Chapman’s Piloting, Seamanship and Small Boat Handling . It’s this type of marketing (plus price: the 1992 price was $13,500) that has helped make Hunter one of the most successful sailboat producers in the U.S.

No one has ever faulted the Alachua, Florida, builder for offering anything but fresh, well-thought out designs. The most striking feature of the 23.5 is its water ballast system, new to Hunter. The system permits an operator to remove 1,000 pounds of ballast from the trailering weight. A retractable centerboard, kick-up rudder and mast that’s fairly easy to step and unstep further enhances trailerability. All told, boat, motor and trailer weigh a combined 2,450 pounds. This model also contains enough foam to provide positive flotation.

While Hunter has enjoyed considerable success with the buying public, it has also suffered from a negative image problem. Earlier PS reviews have criticized Hunter products for a lack of quality control-various systems kinks, lightweight hulls, poor finish work and general absence of blue-water seaworthiness. On the other hand, Hunter owners, while acknowledging a prevailing lack of respect, frequently defend their choice. In the realm of objective data, Coast Guard complaint and recall statistics reveal that Hunter has a better than average record when it comes to hull blistering. (Hunter offers five-year bottom blister warranty protection for the 23.5.) Clearly, the company is doing something right. The model we inspected (hull #8) showed, with very few exceptions, careful attention to detail and finish work in even the least accessible places-more than youd expect on a $13,500 boat. But it is also a boat with some inherent contradictions, in our opinion.

The 23.5 is a highly engineered product with lots of thoughtful features. Hunter, unlike some builders, constructs a mock-up, followed by a prototype that is extensively tested before final design decisions are made. The hull form is modern looking, almost powerboaty in appearance from some angles. Continuing a tendency evident in recent Hunters, the design team has given the 23.5 a relatively full hull, and raised the freeboard to reduce the cabin height, as well as add room below and keep those up top dry in a chop. Because the cabin extends to the rail (no side decks), you must climb over the cabin top to get to the foredeck.

The rig (a B&R design) consists of a 28-foot Z. Spar mast, fractionally rigged with swept-back spreaders that eliminate the need for a backstay (and make un-stepping/stepping, hence trailering, simpler); for the most part, the uppers are aft of the “after” lowers-until deck level-creating a triangular support system. Main and jib halyards are internal and led back to the cockpit. Power comes from a fully battenedmainsail and 110-percent jib (UK Sailmakers-Hong Kong) with a total of 236 square feet. For steering, the traditional wooden tiller has been replaced with a brushed aluminum tube that arches over the walk-through transom (swim ladder comes standard). The aluminum, said chief designer Rob Mazza, weathers better and is easier to arch in order to keep the rudder low and the tiller sufficiently high. Many helmsmen will use the standard Ronstan X-10 tiller extension.

The water ballast/keel system constitutes the key feature of the 23.5. The water ballast-125 gallons, or 1,000 pounds-takes about two minutes to bring on board. The system is activated by flipping up a lid at the base of the companionway, opening a vent and turning a T-valve; the valve in turn drops a circular stainless steel plate aft of the keel, exposing four holes in the hull. (The plate can then be closed flush.) And while you can’t jettison the water downwind, you can swing up the centerboard to reduce draft to 18 inches. The 4-foot centerboard, controlled by the outboard line to the cockpit, moves easily up and down via a cascade block and tackle arrangement.

The apparent thinking of Hunter engineers was to provide a simple, one-step water ballast system that keeps draft shallow while lowering the center of gravity for added stability and righting moment. The ballast-about 16 cubic feet in volume-lies immediately below the waterline. When the water is added, the boat sinks several inches. Nevertheless, while the water adds 1,000 pounds to the overall displacement, its location does not seem to provide sufficient righting moment for windward work in gusty conditions. On racing boats, water ballast is carried above the waterline and outboard under the settees, which of course provides more righting moment. But this water must be pumped into the chambers and drained before tacking-too complicated for Hunter’s purposes.

Hunter 23.5

Construction of the boat is fairly straightforward, with balsa in the hull and plywood in the deck. The plywood core has the potential to encourage water migration should a deck leak occur at some point. The deck/hull joint, with a roll similar to a Hobie 18-a “modified shoebox,” one Hunter engineer described it-is bonded with glass and further fastened by flathead screws through the rubrail. Stanchions, fastened to aluminum backing plates that are glassed in, are sturdy. Though not a heavily-built boat, the 23 looks solid enough; in the absence of a graceful hull form-no sheer here-Hunter provides some added dash with a smoked forward-facing window and a green and purple hull swoosh graphic, which apparently has drawn strong reaction, pro and con (We liked it). Oddly, there is no waterline or boot scribed in the hull. Perhaps Hunter anticipates owners dry-sailing the 23.5, but the absence of a waterline mark will make bottom painting a difficult chore the first time.

Performance

We test sailed the 23.5 off Newport, Rhode Island. In light-air conditions, the shallow-body, lightweight boat (displacement 3,000 pounds with the water ballast) moved up to speed quickly. The boat pointed high and the few light puffs we experienced produced no noticeable helm. We did have some problem finding a definitive groove, especially after tacking. The boat glided through the water easily on a reach and downwind, with the board up, sped along as much as a 23-footer can (Mazza said it will surf under the right conditions). We moved relatively faster, in fact, than a Nonsuch 27 on the same tack.

In stronger 15-20 knot winds, it is a whole different experience. With a single reef in the mainsail, the boat consistently rounds up and stalls. In addition to the boat’s higher vertical center of gravity, this tendency may also be due to the very high-aspect ratio centerboard, which is generally associated with quick stall characteristics.

Complicating matters is the way the rig and sheeting are set up. With no backstay (or topping lift) and no traveler, and with the main sheeted down and far forward near the companionway, the main and sheet are highly stressed. And because the cam cleat for the mainsheet is down near the cockpit sole, it’s difficult to reach-especially in heavy air on a beat, when the helmsman and everyone else is out on the rail. The rounding up and stalling require constant spilling of the main. This may be okay (if tiring) for the experienced sailor, but a bit strenuous and nerve-wracking for the beginner at whom this boat is marketed.

Instead of a single reef, one solution might be to take a second reef in the main in anything approaching 15 knots, but that’s not much of a solution. With 236 square feet of sail-128 in the main, 108 in the foretriangle-for a sail area-displacement ratio of 18.9, the boat should not be overpowered. (The O’Day 23, of about the same displacement, but with 200 more pounds of ballast, carries 246 square feet)

Another solution, although it breaks up the cockpit, might be a barney post where there’s already a slot for the cockpit table, a system that worked well enough in the Alerion-Express. A traveler would be even better, though obviously Hunter wanted to keep the cockpit clear of obstructions as well as avoid the added cost.

Accommodations

You get a lot for your money with this Hunter model. One thing you get a lot of is interior space or, as company literature describes it, “a 25-foot boat in a 23.5 hull.” The main cabin is sizable and has more headroom than we’ve seen on a 23-footer. A pop-top hatch allows those down below to stand up in the center of the cabin. An optional canvas camper top ($300) provides protection from the elements. Poptops are notoriously leaky, and we can’t vouch for this one’s water tightness; however, Hunter has provided drains all around.

The smoked pop-top, plus three ports per side in the main cabin (two small circles, one longer swoosh-style forward) and the forward-facing window provide plenty of light. Hunter has made no attempt to yacht-up the interior: What you get is a basic cream-colored liner, offset on a portion of the topsides by a close-weave grayish fabric someone called “monkey fur.” Despite the plainness, we liked the clean look of the interior.

Aft to port in the main cabin you get a galley station with a one-burner alcohol stove, sink, and fold-out table with storage below. You won’t be whipping up any Cruising World -style feasts in this galley, but it’s nice to be able to heat up some coffee or a cup of soup. Forward of the galley is a small settee/berth, sized right for a child, with storage beneath and a cutout for a portable ice chest. Opposite is a somewhat longer settee/berth of less than six feet, with more storage and a battery compartment below. On the centerline is a slot for a small table that also can be set up in the cockpit.

There are a number of helpful additions: an automatic bilge pump, access plates underneath the cockpit winches. The portable toilet is located to starboard behind a half-bulkhead and privacy curtain, and under the V-berth. Aside from the standard V-berth in the bow, which seems a bit cramped, there’s a double berth (plus stowage) aft of the main cabin, under the cockpit and seats (not for the claustrophobic). It was back here in the bowels of the boat that we spotted the only untrimmed fiberglass.

On deck, there’s an equally roomy cockpit-7′ 9″ long and 6′ 2″ from coaming to coaming. The relatively wide beam makes the addition of a ridge along the centerline for use as a footrest a welcome touch. Foam padding on the seatbacks is another. A lazaret on either side provides on-deck stowage. There’s a #8 Barient winch on either side of the cabin top, each with an attendant cleat. Lines are meant to be kept in the no-name stoppers to starboard. Because of the profusion of lines led back on the starboard side, we’d prefer an extra cleat and winch.

Nonskid is molded in. The foredeck holds an anchor locker, which also contains a padeye for the stepping/unstepping operation. Skipping the details of this procedure-which involves use of a gin pole, the main and jib halyards and a bridle that controls lateral movement-we’d say that Hunter has devised as easy a way to drop a mast as is possible. Once down, the forward end rests in a U-shaped bend in the bow pulpit, the aft end on a roller-topped pole fitted at the transom.

Conclusions

In its attempt to create a simply operated, easily trailered, entry-level boat at a good price, Hunter has come up with some clever compromises. But they are compromises just the same. The 23.5 sails well on all points in light air; it does well off the wind in heavier air. Windward work over 15 knots in this boat is poor in our estimation. We’d strongly recommend that potential customers thoroughly test sail the boat in a variety of wind conditions, experimenting with one or two reefs, to be certain it’s something they’re able-and willing-to handle.

The Hunter 23.5 is clearly striking a chord with some buyers, and assuming many are entry-level sailors, we think it’s great that this boat is attracting newcomers to the sport. The design represents a clever way of managing the trailering problem (i.e., weight and draft). At the same time, we can’t help but wonder if its behavior in gusty winds is worth the convenience of dumping ballast on the launch ramp.

RELATED ARTICLES MORE FROM AUTHOR

excellent article.

Darrell – excellent review. Thanks.

Thanks for the review, I just saw one for sale online.

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HUNTER 240 Detailed Review

https://images.harbormoor.com/originals/bab90c0b-e363-40ce-8f88-5e9dd9cda7ca

If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of HUNTER 240. Built by Hunter Marine (USA) and designed by undefined, the boat was first built in 1997. It has a hull type of Swing Keel and LOA is 7.34. Its sail area/displacement ratio 16.12. Its auxiliary power tank, manufactured by undefined, runs on undefined.

HUNTER 240 has retained its value as a result of superior building, a solid reputation, and a devoted owner base. Read on to find out more about HUNTER 240 and decide if it is a fit for your boating needs.

Boat Information

Boat specifications, sail boat calculation, rig and sail specs, accomodations, contributions, who builds hunter 240.

HUNTER 240 is built by Hunter Marine (USA).

When was HUNTER 240 first built?

HUNTER 240 was first built in 1997.

How long is HUNTER 240?

HUNTER 240 is 6.73 m in length.

What is mast height on HUNTER 240?

HUNTER 240 has a mast height of 7.39 m.

Member Boats at HarborMoor

SPECIFICATIONS

  • DESCRIPTION

(SOLD) 2004 Hunter 240

Lightly used and well maintained Hunter 240 Sailboat with trailer.  Excellent day sailor with swing keel and four stroke Tohatsu outboard.  Owner has moved up to a larger boat.

  • Manufacturer: Hunter
  • Category: Sail
  • Condition: Used
  • Location: Bayville US
  • Vessel Name: A Good Run
  • Hull Material: Fiberglass
  • Designer: Hunter Design Team
  • Make: Tohatsu
  • Engines(s): 1
  • Engine Type: Outboard 4 Stroke
  • Fuel Type: unleaded
  • Horsepower: 6|horsepower
  • Total Berths: 4
  • Total Heads: 1
  • Length: 24.08 ft
  • Beam: 8.25 ft
  • Draft - max: 5.5 ft
  • Fresh Water Tank: 6.5|gallon
  • Holding Tank:

DESCRIPTIONS

Sail Area IJPE : 242.00 sq ft I : 25.50 ft J : 8.50 ft P : 24.25 ft E : 11.00 ft Working Sail Area : 236.00 sq ft

Manufacturer Provided Description Fun to sail, easy to trailer, and a snap to set up, the Hunter 240 will provide real enjoyment with little effort. The integral water ballast system provides great stability under sail, but also allows for easy trailering with smaller vehicles when emptied. An innovative mast raising system makes rigging and launching an easy exercise. The standard custom trailer will have sailors in and out of the launch ramp in minutes. A large cockpit, plenty of storage, and all lines led aft makes sailing simple. Two double berths - plus a workable galley and portable head - make weekending comfortable. Hunter Marine's water-ballasted trailerables are comfortable cruisers that are easy to tow because the stability is left in the water, not on the trailer. Whether trailer sailing across the country or just across town, Hunter makes the experience truly easy with a rig that is safe, simple, and fast to set up and take down.

Disclaimer The Company offers the details of this vessel in good faith but cannot guarantee or warrant the accuracy of this information nor warrant the condition of the vessel. A buyer should instruct his agents, or his surveyors, to investigate such details as the buyer desires validated. This vessel is offered subject to prior sale, price change, or withdrawal without notice.

PRESENTED BY

Andrew cousins, get brochure.

Fill out the form below to download the PDF brochure for 2004 Hunter 240

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Electric system for Hunter 240

  • Thread starter Chern
  • Start date Apr 23, 2018
  • Forums for All Owners
  • Ask All Sailors

I just got Hunter 240 and need to set up new power system. Batteries, solar panels etc. I need to power lights, bilge, radio, depthfinder, small fan, tablet, phone. I am not good at electricity. I need a good advice. Please help me!!!! Questions: How many batteries do I need? What can I do with 2 batteries vs 1? Can I run small appliances like coffee maker? I understand that I need deep cycle batteries but they can be different too, which one is better? What charge controller 20A? 30A? How powerfull solar battery just for charging? If I'll buy 100w solar battery can it run anything while charging? How can I connect my boat electric system to the shore power ? Thank you for your help  

rgranger

Hi Chern Sounds like you need this book. I have a copy and it helps a lot. It is also available through amazon https://books.google.com/books/abou..._Sailboa.html?id=NfPxPq-aSbkC&source=kp_cover  

Here is one of Don's books devoted just to electrical stuff https://books.google.com/books?id=FTGOui1F-JkC&source=gbs_similarbooks  

Kermit

There’s no need to fear. @Crazy Dave Condon is here! Seriously. He’s got the know-how to help you know how.  

You will make best progress if you explain why you need to set up a new power system, and does that include new wiring? Second make a list of all the electrical devices you want and how much power each uses per hour when turned on. Make it a Christmas list - you can always cut back in planning. Get that book or go to the forum on this site: Musings With Maine Sail.  

There is wiring on the boat but no batteries. I have running lights, bilge, depth finder, I'll need to connect radio, and charge phone, tablet etc. I don't know how much electricity these will use that's why I am asking shoud one battery enough what i'll get if I'll have 2 batteries? what solar panel is smallest that I need to charge 1 batteru? 2? what I am getting if I'll buy 100w solar?  

I’m NOT an expert on any of this. But... the only advantage I see to two batteries is more money and more headaches. It sounds like you won’t have a big demand from what you’ve listed. But... did I mention I’m not an expert?  

Do you have shore power? And if so, will you be staying at a marina? If so, just charge your batteries when tied off at the marina.  

Crazy Dave Condon

What do you really plan to do with the boat? Charging cell phone direct from a battery wii deplete the battery quickly. One question are you a heavy user of a cell phone where some is think it should not be when sailing but merely enjoying sailing instead?  

No shore power  

Planning to use tablet or phone as a chartplotter  

I have two deep cycle batteries... and a 25 w solar panel mounted to the mast crutch pole. I’m on my phone right now or I’d could post pictures for you. I might have some of the instal in my album on my profile page. I run fans, a depth finder, charge a vhf radio and me, the wife and the kids charge phones ... so far no problems No tablet in my mix so ymmv  

Ron20324

Kermit said: But... did I mention I’m not an expert? Click to expand
Ron20324 said: That was already obvious Click to expand

CrispyCringle

CrispyCringle

Everything on your list, except the laptop is easy. A typical laptop with an AC charger would require an AC inverter. And probably one that is too expensive to make it worth it, like a true sine wave type. I have a single battery that easily powers a small DC fan and a cell phone, as well as the stock electrical system lights and bilge. It lasts quite awhile. Although I havnt run the fan very much simply because I havnt had to. You can get a simple panel with USB charging ports and a 12 volt automotive type socket on Amazon. Just hook up the pos and neg (with an inline fuse) to the battery. I cant see how that wouldnt last you all day on one battery charge, if not longer. You just need to figure out your solar. A simple system (panel and controller) is all you need. Again Amazon is a good place to start. And Im talking a typical smallish boat, not a 53' Amel.  

Thank you CrispyCringle. Do i need inline fuse and controller even for small solar panel, like 10W or for bigger one?  

I would recommend a controller always, because you dont want to over charge the battery. And Id get the biggest solar panel you can fit. 100 watt min. As for the fuse for the controller- whatever the controller directions recommend. But definitely an inline for the accessory panel.  

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IMAGES

  1. HUNTER 240

    hunter 240 sailboat data

  2. Sailing boats

    hunter 240 sailboat data

  3. Hunter 240

    hunter 240 sailboat data

  4. 2004 Hunter 240

    hunter 240 sailboat data

  5. Hunter 240 All Specifications

    hunter 240 sailboat data

  6. 2001 Hunter 240 Croisières (voile) à vendre

    hunter 240 sailboat data

VIDEO

  1. Amazing boat fits in a box

  2. Hunter 23.5 2nd reef "tamed the tiger"

  3. Bayliner Buccaneer 240 Launching From Trailer

  4. Hunter Formula One Sailing Rutland Sailing Club

  5. HUNTER 25-2 Boat Tour

  6. 1979 Hunter 33' Sailboat

COMMENTS

  1. HUNTER 240

    Total weight (without water ballast): 2300lbs./1043kgs. Sailing weight: 3600lbs./1632kgs. Some Hunter promotional material list the E rig measurement as 11 ft / 3.35m. Referred to as the Hunter Legend 240 when sold in the UK.

  2. Hunter 240

    Hunter 240 is a 24′ 0″ / 7.3 m monohull sailboat designed by Hunter Design and built by Hunter Marine starting in 1998. Great choice! Your favorites are temporarily saved for this session. ... 1998 Hunter 240 $9,000 USD. View. 2 / 27 Ohio, US 2004 Hunter 240 ...

  3. Hunter 240

    The Hunter 240 is a recreational keelboat, built predominantly of fiberglass. It has a fractional sloop B&R rig, a raked stem, a walk-through reverse transom, a transom-hung rudder controlled by a tiller and a retractable centerboard. It displaces 3,600 lb (1,633 kg) and carries 1,300 lb (590 kg) of flooding water ballast.

  4. Hunter 240

    The Hunter 240 is a 24.08ft b&r designed by Hunter Design and built in fiberglass by Hunter Marine (USA) between 1997 and 2005. The Hunter 240 is a light sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a day-boat.

  5. Review of Hunter 240

    Floor plan of Hunter 240. Interior of Hunter 240. The interior is like most other boats made of teak. Teak has the advantage of being naturally very oily and therefore water-repellent, which is suitable on boats. The boat is equipped with 3 cabins, 5 berths, a galley, toilet facility and 10 liter waste water capacity.

  6. Considering a Hunter 240

    Sailboat Data shows the boat at 3200#'s empty with another 1200#'s added when in the water. We will bee keeping the boat in the water year around. Is there an additive that is environmental friendly that should be added to the ballast. ... The vent for the water ballast tank is located under teak step inside the cabin of the hunter 240. To exit ...

  7. PDF HUNTER OWNER S MANUAL

    Pitch: 1, the up and down motion of the bows of a boat plunging over the waves; 2, the angle of the propeller blades. Point of sailing: the different angles from which a boat may sail; the boat's course relative to the direction of the wind. Port: the left-hand side of the boat, looking forward (opp. of starboard).

  8. Hunter 240

    Sailboat data, rig dimensions and recommended sail areas for Hunter 240 sailboat. Tech info about rigging, halyards, sheets, mainsail covers and more. Sailboat Data directory for over 8,000 sailboat designs and manufacturers. Direct access to halyards lengths, recommended sail areas, mainsail cover styles, standing rigging fittings, and lots ...

  9. Hunter 240 Sail Data

    Complete Sail Plan Data for the Hunter 240 Sail Data. Sailrite offers free rig and sail dimensions with featured products and canvas kits that fit the boat. ... Sailboat Data ; Hunter 240 Sail Data ; Hunter 240 Sail Data. Pinit. SKU: X-SD-8595 . Quantity discounts available . Quantity Price; Quantity -+ Add to Cart . Details. Details. 2300 lbs ...

  10. Beginner's first Cruise in the Florida Keys in a Hunter 240

    The 240 has a 5 hp Outboard - and while not fast, handled well into 20 knot winds in February. This is my Quick "Best Case" Itinerary - if weather, wind, and willpower allow. Day One - Boat out of storage and put in at Bahia Honda for night one.

  11. How does the Hunter 240 sail?

    Aug 10, 2021. #12. @waterman30. The max heel of any water ballast sailboat is 12-14 degrees controlled by use of sails. Warren Luhrs who owned Hunter concurred due to the design of the hull. As to the outboard motor, it is the motor issue. Can you post a photo and tell us the make and model of the motor.

  12. Hunter 240

    I watch with interest for discussions regarding 240s. After many years of sailing with others and chartering boats, I finally bought my first boat (a 1999 240) last August. Fortunately, the original owner had bought many upgrades and extras. I was quite pleased with purchase and what we got and what we paid.

  13. Sailing boats

    1 , Teak , 25.0 , Fibreglass , Frazionato , Sailing boat , 6.73 , Hunter 240 , 5 , hunter-240 , 3 , 2.51 , 1.68 , 0 , 4959 , 7.34 , Luhrs , 590.0 , Marlow Hunter , 1. ...

  14. 2000 Hunter 240 Boat Specs, Tests and Reviews

    Get the latest 2000 Hunter 240 boat specs, boat tests and reviews featuring specifications, available features, engine information, fuel consumption, price, msrp and information resources. ... 2000 Hunter 240. 2000 Hunter 240 Specs. Boat Type: Monohull Sailboats; Hull Material: Fiberglass; Beam: 8'3" Length: 24' Net Weight: 2300 lbs;

  15. Hunter

    Sailboat data directory for sailboats manufacturer or named Hunter. Follow the provided links for additional Sailboat data, parts and rigging specs. ... Hunter 240. Hunter 25. Hunter 25 Box Top. Hunter 25.5. Hunter 26. Hunter 26.5. Hunter 260. Hunter 27. Hunter 27 Edge. Hunter 270. Hunter 27-2. Hunter 27-3. Hunter 27X. Hunter 28. Hunter 28.5 ...

  16. Hunter 23.5

    3. Hunter Marine Corp. is noted for its slick, innovative and low-cost mass production sailers. The Hunter 23.5, new in 1992, fits the bill in all respects. Hunter 23.5 Specs. The 23.5 was designed as a trailerable family cruiser for entry-level sailors. Like most Hunters, the boat offers lots of space in the cockpit and down below, and comes ...

  17. HUNTER 240: Reviews, Specifications, Built, Engine

    1 of 1. If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of HUNTER 240. Built by Hunter Marine (USA) and designed by undefined, the boat was first built in 1997. It has a hull type of Swing Keel and LOA is 7.34. Its sail area/displacement ratio 16.12.

  18. 2004 Hunter 240

    Sail Area IJPE : 242.00 sq ft I : 25.50 ft J : 8.50 ft P : 24.25 ft E : 11.00 ft Working Sail Area : 236.00 sq ft. Manufacturer Provided Description Fun to sail, easy to trailer, and a snap to set up, the Hunter 240 will provide real enjoyment with little effort. The integral water ballast system provides great stability under sail, but also ...

  19. Electric system for Hunter 240

    Hunter Hunter 240 Sidney. Apr 23, 2018. #1. I just got Hunter 240 and need to set up new power system. Batteries, solar panels etc. I need to power lights, bilge, radio, depthfinder, small fan, tablet, phone. I am not good at electricity. I need a good advice. Please help me!!!!

  20. Hunter 240 boats for sale

    2023 World Cat 235CC. Find 28 Hunter 240 boats for sale near you, including boat prices, photos, and more. Locate Hunter boat dealers and find your boat at Boat Trader!