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Edwards Yacht Sales

Edwards Yacht Sales

  • 866.365.0706

1986 Dickerson 37

  • Clearwater, FL, US

Yacht price

1986 Dickerson 37

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Vessel is currently a project boat!  

In late August, the price was dropped to 15,000 for a quick sale.   The seller wants the boat sold as quick as possible and decided to make a significant price drop to facilitate.

See broker notes for a list of possible projects.

Celeste a 37' Dickerson, built in Trappe, Md off the Chesapeake Bay has long been well known as a rugged offshore cruising boat with a modified fin keel and a skegged hung rudder.  She is a cutter rigged sloop that has good tracking ability plus good maneuverability.  The Dickerson 37 is known for it's quality and tradition and has a reputation as a fast well-balanced offshore boat.

This 37' has an upgraded 40 hp Yanmar diesel engine.  She is very well equipped with a great compliment of sails.  The hull, deck and cabin appears to be in good condition.

Specifications

Descriptions, basic information, dimensions & weight.

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1986 Dickerson 37

This vessel has a v-berth forward with storage beneath the berth, an overhead hatch and two opening ports.  Hanging lockers are aft to port and starboard with the main salon just aft. 

The main salon has port and starboard settees with a dining table mounted on the forward starboard bulkhead.  The starboard settee converts to a double bed.  The salon has two opening ports on each side and an overhead hatch in the center.  Storage is provided above and behind the seat backs and beneath the seats.

Aft to port is the galley with an extra deep stainless steel sink with filtered hot and cold pressure water, a GSI stainless propane stove with oven, dry storage locker, large ice box plus storage cabinets and lockers for food and dishes.

Across to starboard is the head with a manual marine toilet, vanity with sink, shower plus storage for toiletries.

Aft to starboard is a quarterberth with a comfortable bed with storage beneath the bed and across is a matching quarterberth.

Up the companionway steps is a comfortable cockpit with wheel steering with pedestal mounted Simrad autopilot remote and a Raytheon GPS chart plotter.  Raytheon wind speed, apparent wind speed indicator and depth sounder are located on the port cockpit bulkhead.  Four stainless steel dorade vents are located on the cabin top.  A stainless steel swim ladder is mounter on the transon.

  • Two burner stainless GSI propane stove with oven
  • Stainless steel sink with filtered hot and cold pressure water
  • Large ice box
  • Storage for food and dishes
  • 6 gallon hot water heater
  • 35 lb CQR anchor with 50' chain & 100' nylon rode
  • 23 lb Fortess
  • Manual Simpson/Lawrence Sea Horse anchor windlass
  • 4" Samson post on bow
  • Stainless bow and stern rails
  • Side gates & aft gate
  • Stainless ladder
  • Fenders & lines
  • 90 gallon water tank
  • Shur-Flo fresh water accumulator tank
  • Manual fire extinguisher
  • Manual marine head
  • Wheel steering
  • Martex 2 blade folding prop (newer from 2000)
  • Battery parallel switch
  • Jabsco electric bilge pump
  • 2000 Yanmar 3 cylinder diesel engine 40 hp (not running good, see broker notes)
  • Racor fuel filter
  • One engine battery and two house batteries
  • 40 gallon fuel tank
  • Engine alarm & emergency stop
  • One Doyal Main sail (good condition)
  • Two Genoa sails (150% & 140%), (one fair condition and one needs repairs (leech cord sleeve re-sewn))
  • Two 110% Yankees sails (both fair condition)
  • One Staysail (fair condition)
  • Asymmetrical Spinnaker (small)
  • North Sail Roller furling for headsail
  • Lewmar two speed self-tailing primary winches
  • Stainless steel Rigging
  • Manual boom vang
  • Aluminum spars stepped on deck
  • Inside genoa tracks

Vessel was moved to the hard in April 2018 to possible undergo a bottom job, engine recondition and general refit.   It was trucked to the owner property near Clearwater in Safety Harbor.

Vessel is currently a project boat!

Engine runs on 2 of the 3 cylinders and needs repairs.  It has external oil leak.  The injector of the non running cylinder has been replaced so possible it is a head issue or beyond.  Starter was replaced.

Bottom has about 12 average size blisters that should repaired  It will also need a fresh bottom paint job.

Exterior projects are blister repaired, bottom painted, running gear inspected and maintained, hull waxed, deck wood work or trim refinished, sail equipement re-rigged, all deck equipment (staysail track has a leak into cabin) inspected and maintained, electronics updated (GPS/Chart Plotter,  Depth Sounder, Wind and Speed all not working and need replacement), etc., etc.

Interior projects are engine repaired (possible head or value job and new fuel filter system), transmission inspected and maintained, all on-board systems inspected and maintained, all interior wood work or trim refinished, all hatches (two hatches need replacing) and ports inspected and maintained, etc., etc.

Boat is being offer as is.  Since boat is on the hard, trial run and full survey is not reasonably possible or cost prohibited because engine is not running correctly and boat is de-rigged.  Any partial survey, if necessary, should be done in current location.

New owner will need to have the boat transported to a boat yard to complete some of the above projects prior to resplashing the boat.

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For sale 1986 Dickerson 37 sailboat

Discussion in ' Other ' started by sailah , Aug 2, 2020 .

sailah

sailah Lampin' it

A long shot but you never know if someone is looking for an escape pod. 1986 Dickerson 37 AC Location: Hingham, MA Phone : 781 789-6008 Owner: Peter Owens aka Sailah Price : $60,000 Official specs of Dickerson 37 Noted in Ferenc Mate's Worlds Best Sailboats We are not getting the cruising time that I expected over last 2 years. Young kids and other competing interests. Cruised boat in New England waters and it has spent most of its life in New England . Boat is hauled and stored behind my barn every season, covered and on shore power . Boat is currently on mooring at Hingham Shipyard, ready to go. Can happily take serious buyers for a sail and walk through what's involved in owning a boat like this. Raced the boat mainly in Figawi. Highlights include a 2nd in class 2016 and Line Honors in 2018. Boat rates a 189 in race trim and can easily out sail that in good wind . We finish about a 145 typically. These boats were solidly built in Trappe, MD, good performers and beautiful to look at. My penchant for varnish is well known on these forums Every season I have tackled a large project 2016: Brightwork brought back and 3-4 coats done every year since 2017: Engine , custom bobstay and spin crane 2018: Rewire 2019: New electronics and NMEA2K network Engine: Westerbeke 44B with ZF MIV15 V drive transmission . 1087 hours (approx 125 hours/season) PSS dripless seal Maxprop Classic 3 blade Engine oil drain pump Custom fuel polisher setup with 2 large 5 micron filters set to run whenever engine is running New Heat Exchanger (2020) Westerbeke panel in cockpit Racor 500 primary I've done a lot of work to this engine. Inherited a few issues which have now been rectified and engine runs perfectly. Idles and runs with zero issues, no smoke, no bad behavior. I could talk about what I have done with this engine for a week. Engine room is very clean and thoughtfully laid out. This isn't one of those nightmare engine rooms where everything is rusty and hasn't seen light of day. I appreciate a clean engine space, new hose clamps, everything loomed, chafe free, no drips or weirdness going on here. I am very particular about how things are maintained. Electrical : Balmar 100A alternator Complete recable of all main wiring to panel, including upsized cables and profession crimps/heat shrink everywhere. Balmar ARS-5 regulator (2) 6V 230Ah golf cart batteries for house (2019), 230Ah 12V capacity (1) Group 31 Start (2019) Balmar SG-200 smart gauge Victron SmartSolar 15A solar controller 80W flexible panel that is deployed on aft deck and can be quickly removed during sailing. I use it to keep batteries 100% at mooring Blue Seas ACR and parallel main battery switch 30A charger Shorepower connection and shorepower cable 120V panel with outlets at nav station and galley Tankage: 44gal aluminum fuel tank with separate pickup for polisher 10gal black water 90 gal fresh water stainless tank under V berth Electronics : Garmin 942XS touchscreen in navpod Raymarine ST-60+ wind , speed, depth gauges networked to Garmin Garmin 18HD radome on mast Garmin 440 chartplotter at nav station with separate GMR18 antenna on pulpit Icom M504 VHF with DSC , networked to Garmin for GPS . MMSI programmed. Mast head antenna Backup Garmin 3206 chartplotter under port cockpit seat as 3rd backup to other 2 Garmins Clarion CD stereo in salon with speakers in salon and new Kenwood speakers in cockpit. Bluetooth. Ritchie Compass Simrad hydraulic autopilot networked to Garmin Edson pedestal with Edson teak cockpit table Accommodations: V berth cabin forward Port quarterberth Pull out berth in salon that can be a double Teak and Holly sole, varnished Dickinson propane heater in salon with Charlie Noble stack Proper nav station with seat and locker underneath (spares) and owners manual Rig: Keel-stepped mast Spinnaker crane Custom bobstay for running asymmetric Nice North sharkskin Dacron Main 150 Genoa in OK condition 6-7 other genoas in poor to good shape. Mostly laminates for the occasional race Brand new (as in never taken out of bag) Code 0 2 asymmetrical spinnakers, 1 in good shape, one Airex in excellent shape. 1 snuffer sock. Pad eyes aft and all equipment to fly them including lightweight spin sheets , halyards. Lewmar Ocean hatches Bomar ports Lewmar 44 2 speed self tailing winches Quick Vang Ground Tackle: Muir Cougar windlass (oversized) CQR 35# anchor with 150' chain, 150' 5/8" rode Spare Danforth with chain and rope rode in laz Galley : Adler Barbour refrigeration (freezes water bottles in a couple hours) 3 burner stove (Propane) Underdeck LED lights to illuminate galley On center sink hot/cold water Head : Large head Toilet Shower is very spacious 10gal black water with diverter and Whale gusher pump as well a deck pumpout Other: Forespar davits (not installed) but removed with all harware Bimini frame (removed, and no canvas but hoops are in perfect condition) Dodger frame is there and old dodger included. Was going to redo it in 2020 but never got around to it Custom winter cover 5 Brownell stands Epoxy barrier coated in 2009 Bluewater 45 bottom paint every spring Dickinson Propane cabin heater MarineAir AC (currently decommissioned) unknown condition, I've never used it. But all the ducting is there, compressor etc. Requires shorepower. Comments: I really do love this boat and I won't be sad if it doesn't sell. I'm even more sad to see it sitting and not being used. It's turnkey on a mooring in Hingham MA, ready to go. Siena has a lot of brightwork and looks sharp when well maintained. I have done 100% of the work on this boat and know it intimately. I know all systems and can talk a potential buyer through everything, what I have changed, improved and why. Probably forgetting a few things as I wrote this from memory. Extensive photos and manuals for everything on the boat in binders as well a cloud repository for everything accessible through phone . Here are the negatives: Boat was Awlgripped Flag Blue in 2009. It's showing its age but still looks good Link to more photos https://photos.app.goo.gl/hok9DNoUwWkCwGQT8 Video of us demolishing the fleet of 225 boats coming into Nantucket with overall win by a country mile To the victor go the spoils: First place trophy at Figawi 2018
Lots of likes, this boat could be your new passion/escape vehicle Put together a 4K walk thru video, it's pretty extensive and goes over everything on boat and all systems. Long, but thorough.

gratefulJED

gratefulJED long strange tripper

Good job! I don't know a lot but I do know I'd buy from you! Sail that boat around to Puerto Penasco and I'll scrounge up the 60 large
gratefulJED said: ↑ Good job! I don't know a lot but I do know I'd buy from you! Sail that boat around to Puerto Penasco and I'll scrounge up the 60 large Click to expand...
hell yea, epic! I thought years ago I would cut my teeth on the sea of cortez, blue water kinda skeered me, so I opted for most of the systems and learned in an RV lol. Was all in for the boat but met a fella who was sailing alone, fell off and was dragged 800 miles into Cabo...sold his tri for a return ticket home Tempting, very very tempting....nice sailboat there Sailah.
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dickerson 37 sailboat review

Dickerson Owners Association

Dickerson Sailboat Owners

Dickerson Owners and Prospective Owners.

If you have not already done it–renew your dickerson association membership or join now..

As new Dickerson Member Mark Fawcett of Ontario, Canada said. “ It is the Association that is so important about these Dickersons. Everyone was so helpful to me when I purchased my 41 Foot Dickerson Ketch CAVU ”

Get to know your Dickerson neighbor with our 100 Page Directory with contact information on all known Dickerson Owners, A Classified Section on where to obtain Dickerson Parts, Equipment and Services and much more. Join discussions on the Dickerson Facebook https://www.facebook.com/dickersonsailboats/

Join now or renew your Dickerson Association Membership for June 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020. Click on Membership on top of page. Contact us at [email protected] for Membership Form.

23 -24 Sept Dickerson Western Shore Round-Up Survey

Ahoy all Dickerson owners and crew! Have you been looking for a boating activity in September before the fall weather sets in? Then let us know of your interest in attending a Western Shore Round Up on 23 – 24 September on the West River, Maryland.

The fun begins on Friday 23 September at the West River Sailing Club followed by a Rabbit-start race on Saturday 24 September.

Please RSVP by 1 September to your Dickerson Newsletter Editor Chris Burry at [email protected] to let us know of your interest. We will only hold this event if there is enough interest by members.

Captain Randy Bruns of RHYTHMS IN BLUE is looking for a crew-mate to help him sail his boat from Magothy River and help set up the race on Saturday the 24 th . If you are available to assist Randy please contact him directly at [email protected] or via phone at 410-544-5571. 

Read the latest Dickerson news in the attached August 2022 newsletter.

Where have you been sailing your Dickerson this summer?

Chris Burry – SV PLOVER Anchored Lunenburg, Nova Scotia DOA Newsletter Editor

Fair Winds to our Dear Friend

Obituary of joseph william slavin.

Joseph Slavin 95 of Quincy, MA and Annandale, Va. died on March 6, 2022 after a brief illness. He was the husband of his high school sweetheart the late Arlene Harris Slavin to whom he was married for 70 years. He was born in Dorchester,MA on Feb.8, 1927 and was the son of the late Ambrose and Evelyn (Tuttle)Slavin.

Joe graduated from the Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point in 1949 and later attended graduate studies at Tufts University in Boston, MA. He became an expert in Marine Fisheries where his career moved him from Massachusetts to

Washington, DC where he became an Associate Director of the National Marine Fisheries Service under NOAA. After retiring he became a global consultant in fisheries and traveled the world with his expertise.

Joe was one with the sea. At the age of 10 he taught himself to sail on a small boat. From that time on sailing became his passion. The boats became larger, sailing Ipswich Bay, Cape Cod Bay, and Chesapeake Bay. He sailed until the age of 90 on his beloved “Irish Mist” with family and friends. He was an active member of the Dickerson Boat Association and spent many happy days with his fellow Dickerson Boat buddies racing on the Eastern Shore of Maryland

At the age of 90 Joe and Arlene retired to The Crossings in Herndon, VA. They were warmly welcomed by residents and staff. Joe became very involved in updating the library and reading at daily Mass. He became President of the Residence Council and enjoyed contributing to the Crossings community.

Joe’s family was the most important thing in his life. He would drop everything and come if he was needed no matter what time day or night. He was always willing to listen, lend a hand and his advice is legendary ! He had a most inquisitive mind and was an avid reader. He loved life and was always the eternal optimist. Joe and Arlene spent many years of happy vacations at the Veranda Beach Club in Longboat Key, Florida

Joe was pre deceased by his siblings Bob Slavin, Mary May and John Slavin. He is survived by his daughters Elaine Stiles(Kevin) of Portsmouth, RI, Jo-Anne Riabouchinsky(Mike) of King George, VA and Patricia Stallings(Bill) of Fredericksburg, VA. JoJo also leaves his grandchildren Lauren Foley(Pete)of Marshfield, MA, Matt Stiles(Jess) of La Quinta, CA, Paul Riabouchinsky and Alek Riabouchinsky of King George, VA. and great grandchildren Peter Foley, Sarah Foley and Claire Foley of Marshfield, MA.

We would like to express a special thanks to all those who cared for Joe in his illness especially Kadie and Irene.

NOTICE OF RACE 2021 WESTERN SHORE ROUNDUP

Event has been cancelled..

I am delighted to announce we are holding the Western shore Roundup once again after a year of no racing.  It will be held at the West River Sailing Club September 24 and 25.  Sailors can meet at the West River Cookout on Friday evening where you can purchase food and drink and have a nice evening with all of us together again. 

Racing on Saturday is open to all Dickersons as well as other vintage single hull cruising boats whose first hull was laid down prior to 1990.  The race starts at High Noon at WR G1 and features a rabbit start type of race.  Rabbit starts make it easy for all competitors to get a good windward start.  The winner of the race is declared the Sheriff of the Western Shore with a perpetual trophy. We will have a dinner at Pirates Cove that evening. Some sailors continue on Sunday following the race to cruise around together.

There is plenty of water for anchoring off the Club for short dinghying to the Club docks. I am checking on the viability of the Club moorings so stay tuned.  If the docks are free of members two boats could tie up.

If you plan to attend let me know by 20 September and I will email you several pages of Race Instructions and suggestions on starting.  Also let me know if you and your crew plan to attend the cookout; helps the kitchen staff plan.

Of course all this is subject to virus restrictions. The Club has been very conservative on this issue.

Randy Bruns  [email protected] ; 443-994-8844

DICKERSON ASSOCIATION HOSTS CHESAPEAKE CLASSIC SAILBOAT REGATTA

For more than 50 consecutive years, owners of Dickerson yachts have gathered annually at Oxford or Cambridge, MD near the place where their vessels were built. The Dickerson Owners’ Association (DOA) hosts the event — usually on Fathers Day weekend when the owners gather to share their enthusiasm for these classic sailboats. The event receives such rave reviews from attendees that the DOA will soon share it among a larger group of similar classic boats.

Additional Events

We are looking into having some local meetings of Dickerson owners and Associates and encourage any suggestions you may have regarding any possible additions to this program.

Let’s Make Sure Dickersons are Forever

So what are we all about? Have you ever tied up at a dock and a passing sailor comes by and says

“Is that a Dickerson” and you proudly say yes built in 1969 like my wooden “Irish Mist” or yes my boat sailed around the world like D and Don Wogaman’s “Southern Cross”

We have a rich tradition where the sailors that sail these boats are in many ways just like their boats, solid and caring. In my 36 years as a Dickerson Association Member, when some finally had to give up the sailing, they said that “their Dickerson years made up their fondest memories”. Recently joining that group at 91, I know how important it is for all of us to do our bit to really make sure Dickersons are Forever. The Dickerson Owners Association appreciates your faithful and continuing membership over the years and your help in keeping our organization strong. We hope you can join us in this exciting program.

Treasure Chest – Nautical Apparel and Gifts .  See the details .

SURVEY ON WINTERIZING YOUR DICKERSON

Our survey is complete and the results are  available here . Thank you for your participation!

Membership Committee-Joe Slavin, Barry Creighton, John Freal

Find a lost Dickerson and share it with us

Did you know that there may be 150 or more Dickerson Sailboats that are not identified in the 2009 Dickerson Owners Association (DOA) Directory?

The DOA has initiated an ambitious “Find a Lost Dickerson Sailboat” contest and invites all Dickerson fans to participate in the fun. A “Lost Dickerson” is one that we have no record of and is not listed in the 2009 Dickerson Owners Directory.

When visiting ports, marinas and boat yards or sailing in local and “foreign” waters, keep your eyes peeled for a 30, 32, 35, 36, 37, 40 or 41 foot Dickerson sailboat. Get sailor’s name, boat name, length, port and other contact information i.e. telephone number and email. Take a picture if possible.

Send your name and particulars on your Dickerson Discovery to the Dickerson Owners Association Membership Committee at  [email protected] .

For your trouble you will be eligible to win a prize-yet to be decided. Contact us if you have any questions.

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Dickerson Farr 37. I have questions

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I have some questions for anyone who has experience sailing the Dickerson Farr 37. I have read through all of the previous posts on the matter but had some specific questions. 1. It has been said that the boat can be "alot to handle downwind". Is this to the point where it is a round up machine or can you take her with diligent helm? 2. Does she have any characteristics that would specifically make her a poor boat for short handed racing (The running back stays don't intimidate me and I plan on a bow sprit for assyms) 3. what do I not know that I need to from your experience? My previous Boats have been C&C 33mk2, C&C 41custom and C&C 35mk3. All routinely single handed. Regards, Gary  

dickerson 37 sailboat review

gedaggett said: I have some questions for anyone who has experience sailing the Dickerson Farr 37. I have read through all of the previous posts on the matter but had some specific questions. 1. It has been said that the boat can be "alot to handle downwind". Is this to the point where it is a round up machine or can you take her with diligent helm? 2. Does she have any characteristics that would specifically make her a poor boat for short handed racing (The running back stays don't intimidate me and I plan on a bow sprit for assyms) 3. what do I not know that I need to from your experience? My previous Boats have been C&C 33mk2, C&C 41custom and C&C 35mk3. All routinely single handed. Regards, Gary Click to expand...

dickerson 37 sailboat review

All of your previous boats are IOR designs so you are probably familiar with the challenges of carrying a masthead chute on a boat that is prone to excitation rolling and roll steer. My short tenure on a Farr 37 suggested that it is no worse than the boats (i.e. the C&C 41) that you already know, except that it has a little more SA/D, a little more stability, and reaches and runs with a bit more control and speed. If you were to race a Farr 37 short-handed you would want to develop a sail inventory for short-handed sailing and look at how to rearrange the cockpit to make it easier to sail short-handed. It can be done but like most IOR era boats, there may be better choices out there. I have a Farr 11.6 (Farr 38) which was designed slightly before the Farr 37. The 11.6 was not designed to the IOR rule. It makes a great short-handed boat and would be a better short-hander than the 37 if you can find one at a similar price. When I bought my boat I was told it was generally raced with 7-8 people and needed at least 4 to sail with spinnaker. I race her single-handed. Here are some of the items which might be worth considering. 1) Get a reliable below deck autopilot. These boats do not track at deep reach angles and you can't jibe or douse the chute without a good autopilot. 2) Add twings rather that using lazy sheets and guys. 3) Set the boat up for end for end jibing. If the pole and mast have a bell fitting, that will need to be swapped for a conventional pole end and ring. You cannot dip pole jibe short-handed without going through wild modifications. I considered experimenting with being able to dip pole jibe and decided it was too complex. (I can talk you through the system for that if you are interested.) Avoid spinnaker socks or furlers since they can really get you messed up. Never raise or lower the chute without the jib mostly deployed. 4) Add roller furling. I would not plan to sail with the sail partially furled but its important to be able to deploy and furl the jib once the spinnaker is up. 5)Develop a minimally overlapping AP headsail that can be powered up and flattened with backstay adjustments. It will probably be roughly a 125% on that boat and will need be a heavier than usual reinforced high modulus sail with battens and lots of roach. The idea is to keep the sail light but with low stretch. Ideally you end up with the equivalent of an SA/D of around 24 upwind. The sail should be cut for lots of headstay sag in light air and to be bladed out by reducing headstay sag in a breeze. While these boats were designed for 155% genoas, they were also designed for 1,500 lbs of crew weight on the rail and another couple hundred lbs of crew gear down below. The smaller sail plan should work across a broad wind range (2-3 knots to close to 20 knots but with a reefed mainsail once you can't blade the sails enough to keep heel angle below 20 degrees). 6) The winch islands are great when there is a crew, but it puts the jib winches a little too far forward to adjust from the tiller extension so you may need to be able to quickly engage the autopilot and then return to the helm. 7) Do not buy one with wheel steering. The wheel puts you too far aft to reach any of the control lines (except maybe the traveler and backstay adjuster). I would suggest that you try to get aboard and sail one. I like the Farr 37 a lot, but if you can find one at a good price in decent shape, boats like a J-36, Express 37, or Farr 11.6, are better choices as shorthanded racers. Jeff  

Great info guys! That is exactly the info I was looking for. the boat under consideration has dealt with some of those single handed concerns but there is no substitute for weight I the rail and I get that. It is part of my hesitation.  

So here's the thing, almost any racer-cruiser from the IOR era was designed to sail with a lot of weight on the rail. A 37-38 footer might have had 9-10 people onboard in heavy air with everyone perched on the rail upwind and reaching. But that also meant carrying a couple thousand pounds of people and gear. So while it meant that you could carry more sail area into higher wind speeds, it also meant that you also needed to carry more sail area to offset the greater weight. IOR era boats would carry very large sail inventories. They might have a light#1, Heavy#1, #2, #3,#4, and storm jib, and sail changes were very common. With modern high modulus sail cloth, the wind range of any of these sails is greatly increased. Because a high tech sail is much lighter than a Dacron sail with similar stretch characteristics, the high tech sail will maintain it's flying shape into much lighter winds. Because a high tech sail actually stretches less than a Dacron sail, the same sail can be carried into a much higher wind as well. What I did to develop my short-handed sail inventory was to develop a skewed SA/D for my boat. For displacement, I started with the published dry weight and I added 500 lbs for normal sailing gear, water in the tanks and consumables, and 1500 lbs for crew and their gear. I then calculated the sail area with the 155% Genoa, and calculated the SA/D in that configuration. I then took off the 1500 lbs of crew weight an calculated the sail area needed to achieve the same SA/D without the weight. By subtracting the mainsail, I came up with the smaller size Genoa that I wanted for the single handed Genoa. The reality is that there will be some performance loss due to the lack of added stability from crew on the rail, but it is no where near as bad as you might think. This is partially true because modern sails can be bladed out much more effectively than Dacron or the old Kevlar sails. It's partially true because less weight means less drag and less drag means that you don't need as much sail area. In real racing conditions, single-handing I often correct out over fully crewed boats in a broad range of conditions but particularly in lighter winds and heavy air. While high tech sails cost more initially, they have a much larger wind range replacing 2 or 3 sails. But also a good quality and properly spec's high tech sail will last longer than a lower tech sail in terms of holding it's shape which is why many one design classes which previously prohibited high tech sails to keep costs down, now permit high tech sails. By way of example, my prior AP high tech jib lasted 10 years and was only destroyed when I got caught in 40 knots of wind and could not furl it. Jeff  

Thanks Jeff great perspective here. I dim wittedly never even though about full water and fuel for ballast to offset missing crew weight. Good info on the SA/D consideration and sail inventory story with 3Di type materials. Sounds like by going from the 155 down to a new calculated optimal sail size and properly set up boat that single handed perfromance could.be achieved and would have quite the advantage in light air which is more than half of what we see in the great lakes anyhow. Most of out beercan races over the last 5 years have been in winds of 4-10 knots and the Mackinaw race has ussually had at least a day of a high preassure system and searching for breeze. I would imagine having this same SA/D thought process in mind for the Spinnalers would also help to tame the boat down a bit. Sounds like some good conversations with the sailmaker would be in order.  

I want to start by saying that before I ever bought my boat, I planned to own her for a very long time. I also figured that I would be sailing single-hand a lot and hoped to race single or short handed. With that in mind, I was purposely looked for a performance boat with a sail plan and hull form that would be forgiving and could be easily adapted to changing conditions. While I definitely considered a number of IOR boats, the issue with them tends to be that most were short on stability, had sail plans with small high aspect mainsails and were heavily dependent on large overlapping headsails. There were certainly better and worse designs to sail short-handed. For example, boats like the Farr 37, or the Soverel 33 were better than many IOR oriented designs. In the case of the Farr 37, after the Fastnet Disaster, the IOR Rule was amended so that stability was not so heavily penalized. Many of the Farr 37's were altered and had a lead bulb added which definitely improved stability. Ideally you are looking at one of those. But I also bought my boat planning to optimize the deck plan and develop a sail inventory that targeted towards more efficient short-handed sailing. In terms of the sail inventory I wanted to avoid having to do sail changes or sailing with partially furled sails, which meant developing sails that were designed for a very wide wind range. I am suggesting that you might want to talk with a sailmaker before you buy the boat but it can't just be any sailmaker. I is really important to find a sailmaker who understands what I was trying to accomplish and was willing to help me develop a proper inventory with the properly sized and shaped sails. That is not always easy.. I had a terrible experience with North Sails for example. But before I explain what happened I want to explain my thoughts on what makes a good short-handed headsail. In order to produce a headsail with a maximum wind range it will by necessity be smaller than an AP Genoa on a fully crewed boat. To maximize the performance of this smaller sail, it needs to have the maximum luff length that won't 2-block. It needs to be as light a weight as possible for light air. It needs to be cut slightly full like the leading edge of the full sized Genoa, but it needs to be designed for more than usual headsta sag. The headstay sag will hurt pointing ability very slightly but it allows you to tension the forestay (on the Farr 37 with the backstay and check stays) and flatten the Genoa in heavier air. The only way that works for heavy air is to have the sail designed with an exceptionally large amount of high modulus fiber to prevent the slightly fuller shape from stretching in stronger winds. While high modulus fiber is expensive it still represents a small portion of the overall cost of a high tech sail. (My understanding is that greatly increasing the amount of structural fiber in my sails added roughly 5% to the overall cost of the sail.) The added fiber also increases the durability of the sail. My experience with North was that since I was asking for a smaller sail with extra reinforcing fiber, they produced a standard racing #2 which was way too flat to use in lighter winds. When we tried with a second sail, it was cut pretty well but had much less reinforcing and so had a rediculously narrow wind range. I hardly ever used that sail and it delaminated very quickly. I ended up working Dave Flynn at Quantum in Annapolis, who got it immediately. That sail Quantum produced was miraculous. It was good down to 2- 3 or so knots up to 120 degs true and up to around 20 knots, After 10 years and a lot of abuse, I replaced it with a second version of this sail. The new sail uses fiber and technology that was not around back then and it has an even wider wind range than the first Quantum. To save cost, I typically figure out what I want in a sail and then buy it during the annual sale period with flexible delivery which makes it somewhat more affordable. I am not sure what to tell you on the spinnaker. IOR boats typically have problems carrying chutes once the apparent wind gets near 90 degrees. My gut reaction is that I think if I were designing a spinnaker for a Farr 37 I don't think I would make it smaller, but I would want it to be flatter cut to reduce excitation rolling and allow you to carry it at a hotter wind angle without weight on the rail. This is one that you should definitely discuss with your sailmaker and let us know what you find out. That's about it for tonight. Jeff  

Speaking of the impact of single-handing on performance, this is an article that was picked up by Scuttlebutt from the ORC Webpage. It does not say much since it only touches lightly on the impact of not having crw weight on the rail to be able to carry more sail area. It uses an Aerodyne 38 as the example, which is a boat that has all of the boxes checked as a pretty good platform for a short handed race-boat. Yet even in a boat that is well suited to short-hand racing the performance penalty is 10 seconds a mile under ORC. That is a pretty big hit. CHESSS (Chesapeake Sailing Society) had a member discussion on the difference in performance between single and double hand sailing, and the conclusion was that the difference over a race course was in the 6 to 12 seconds a mile range mainly due to impact of either making slower tacks and jibes or else losing the tactical advantages of a tack or jibe when single-handed. I only wish that the article had said more about the basis of the rating difference. Fair ratings for Double Handed racers An advantage to a science-based rating system is being able to produce ratings that more closely reflect how people actually sail their boats. Short-handed sailing is an example where substantially lower crew weight can have a significant effect on rated performance compared to racing with a full crew, yet this is rarely addressed by many rating systems. On ORC certificates there are two double-handed special scoring options: Time-on-Time and Time-on-Distance ratings for General Purpose Handicap (GPH) and the Offshore Single Number (OSN) course models. GPH is an average of the time allowances calculated for all wind angles in 8 to 12 knots of wind speed, while OSN is a weighted average of time allowances for wind speeds from 8 to 16 knots that are found in a typical offshore race. For Annapolis-based Ben Capuco's Aerodyne 38 Zuul, for example, the DH GPH rating is over 10 sec/mi slower than the full-crew GPH, and the DH OSN rating is over 12 sec/mi slower. This reflects the 570 kg (1250 lb) lower crew weight that affects their performance across the ranges of wind speed and wind angles in the two scoring models. Along with eight J/105s, Zuul and 9 other entries will compete in the first Annapolis YC Double Handed Distance Race over September 28-29 on a Chesapeake Bay course intended to last 24 hours. With ORC DH ratings, they can be assured of fair racing  

dickerson 37 sailboat review

Where is this race being held? ( beginning mid and end points) . Do all of you carry AIS? We will be out on the Bay during that time somewhere to be determined but between Annapolis and Solomon's.  

Jeff, Most of the races I will be single handing in are distance races and in a single handed or double handed section. This will help to level the playing field as I will not be a stand alone single handed racer. I will have crew for the beer can series and many other races. interesting the the J105 was mentioned with that article as I considered them as an option, however, I need something that can be a somewhat comfortable family weekends. It sounds like with the right approach I can tame down the DF37 for single handed racing in the big stuff and still keep her quick with a crew. She has a good below deck autohelm and I can add a sprit fairly easily. I know there is a ballast adding option in the bilge that could assist with that further with the stability. Since 75 percent of my racing over the last 5 years has been in lighter air (under 10 - 12knts) I like the idea of the lighter taller rigged boat in those conditions but I know everything is a trade off. The C&C 41 Custom that I raced before my current C&C 35MK3 had a hard time finishing above a Wylie 39 and a Frers 30 in light conditions on corrected time but would destroy the field in winds over 18 knots. In 5-8 knots of wind we just could not compete with the super light boats even when we hit our polars with a flawless start and solid antics on the race course. Still lots to consider but your input and insight has been very helpful.  

gedaggett said: Jeff, Most of the races I will be single handing in are distance races and in a single handed or double handed section. This will help to level the playing field as I will not be a stand alone single handed racer. I will have crew for the beer can series and many other races. interesting the the J105 was mentioned with that article as I considered them as an option, however, I need something that can be a somewhat comfortable family weekends. It sounds like with the right approach I can tame down the DF37 for single handed racing in the big stuff and still keep her quick with a crew. She has a good below deck autohelm and I can add a sprit fairly easily. I know there is a ballast adding option in the bilge that could assist with that further with the stability. Since 75 percent of my racing over the last 5 years has been in lighter air (under 10 - 12knts) I like the idea of the lighter taller rigged boat in those conditions but I know everything is a trade off. The C&C 41 Custom that I raced before my current C&C 35MK3 had a hard time finishing above a Wylie 39 and a Frers 30 in light conditions on corrected time but would destroy the field in winds over 18 knots. In 5-8 knots of wind we just could not compete with the super light boats even when we hit our polars with a flawless start and solid antics on the race course. Still lots to consider but your input and insight has been very helpful. Click to expand...

Jeff H, I was wondering if you might elaborate a bit on why the D Farr 37 is not a good candidate for an assym. Gary  

Its a complex question to explain in a short reply, but here goes. In order to take advantage of an asymmetrical chute you need a boat with a hull form that will make very large gains by heating up and sailing comparatively hot angles. That normally implies a boat with a semi-displacement hull form (by way of comparison think Mumm 36 or Farr 40) (or even more so think of a planning hull), and with a lot of stability relative to drag. Neither characteristic is true for the Farr 37. Boats that best use asymmetrical spinnakers typically see 40%-50% increases in speed by heating up maybe 15-20 degrees in moderate winds (with bigger gains in speeds and VMG at hotter angles in really light winds). While the Farr 37 was one of the better reaching IOR era boats of its size (in terms of its hull form, weight and sail plan), compared to the IMS influenced designs, it really does not offer the same breakthrough speeds gained by sailing hotter angle. And while any boat will pick up a little VMG by heating up in light winds, the huge masthead symmetrical chute and marginally lower wetted-surface on the Farr 37 means that for any wind speed the maximum VMG will be sailing at a much deeper angle than is ideal for a typical AP asymmetrical spinnaker. Because the Farr 37 does not have the high stability of more modern designs, the asymmetrical chute would need to be cut very flat so the sail can be carried up onto a reach, and that flatness would prevent the sail from working well at the deep angles that the boat should be sailed at to make the best VMG. So in order to make this flatter cut asymmetric work, the boat will be sailing at a hotter angle but because of the hull form, the boat will not have a sufficient increase in speed to offset the added distance sailed. I am not sure how clear that really is, but at the heart of it, the deep canoe body, narrow waterline beam, and pinched stern, will limit the hull from being a really good reaching boat relative to the later designs which have hull forms that are better optimized for reaching speeds. Assyms only offer an advantage when reaching but only if the boat has the stability to carry an asymmetrical as the winds increase in speed. Jeff  

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A One-sided Defense of the Cruising Ketch

dickerson 37 sailboat review

This week I had the opportunity to poke around a ketch-rigged Pearson 424 that was for sale in the neighborhood, and although they’ve generally fallen out of favor today, I was reminded of the many advantages of the ketch design. The Pearson 424 is an example of several decades-old production boats that were offered in a variety of rigs (sloop, cutter, or ketch), which has given longtime owners an opportunity to compare sail plans.

Judging from Pearson 424 list prices and bulletin board discussions about the Pearson 424, it appears that the scales are slightly tilted in favor of the sloop and cutter versions. However, the ketch owners are equally emphatic regarding their boats’ positive attributes. Having covered most of my cruising miles aboard a ketch, I’m an impartial party in this debate. So keep in mind, that much of what you read below (redacted from an earlier post of mine) is colored by personal experience.

My affinity for cruising ketches like the Allied Seawind II we feature in the January 2016 issue of Practical Sailor runs contrary to the view of their many detractors. Their criticism goes something like this: Ketches were popular in early days of cruising when undersized winches and friction-bound hardware conspired to make handling large sails a chore. With efficient winches and modern hardware, split rigs are obsolete on boats under 50 feet, they say.

Having wrestled down the main on more than a few 40-footers with state of-the-art everything, I don’t buy this argument, but I’ll let it stand. Nor will I quibble over complaints about a ketchs handicap to windward-which in my view is overstated, at least with regards to the better designs. Being the first boat to reach a windward watering hole is nice, but it’s hardly the first feature you look for in a good cruising boat.

You can explore the cruising blogosphere and find plenty of resident ketch-haters, and indeed, some of the complaints have merit; the added weight and expense of the ketchs extra rigging are irrefutable knocks. But having lived aboard and sailed a much-beloved, 32-foot William Atkin ketch for 10 years, I’m not interested in joining the chorus. Instead, I celebrate the rigs attractions, especially to the short-handed cruiser.

  • Smaller sails are easier to handle. In squally weather, start with a reef tucked in the main, then just furl the mizzen or jib as needed without leaving the cockpit, upsetting helm, or wrestling more reefs into the main.
  • Ride the invisible rail. The fore-and-aft distribution of sails simplifies the task of achieving a rock-steady helm.
  • Impress your sloop-sailing friends with fancy ketch tricks. Sail backward through the mooring field (spin circles if you have a sharpie), nose casually up to anchor, hove-to with jig and jigger.
  • Barrel westward on a reach. Turbo-charge off-wind sailing by setting a mizzen staysail.
  • Don’t fear a dismasting. Having two independently stayed masts increases your odds of having at least one spar to use for jury rigging. (This advantage does not apply to ketches with triatic stays like the lovely Sea Witch.)
  • Sail in good company. Some famous ketches to consider: Steinlager 2 (1990 Whitbread winner), Suhaili (Robin Knox Johnstons Golden Globe race winner), Joshua (Bernard Moitessiers beloved, steel globe-trotter), Wanderer IV (Eric and Susan Hiscocks storied cruiser), Colin Archers heroic little rescue boats . . . the list goes on.
  • Draw longing sighs from those ashore. There is something about having a main and mizzen working together that kindles romantic visions of South Sea islands.

Another nice thing about ketches is that many have reached an age when they are true bargains. Here are just a few familiar ketches worth considering: L. Francis Herreshoffs classic H-28, Gary Hoyts unstayed Freedom 40, Charlie Morgans family-friendly Bahama-mama Out Island 41, Ted Brewers Whitby 42 (aka Brewer 12.8), the Cheoy Lee Offshore 41, any of William Gardens iconic ketches, the Swedish-built Hallberg-Rassy 42, Atkins Ingrid 38 (and her related offspring), John Hannas iconic Tahiti ketch, Holman & Pyes Bowman 57, and two S&S designs, the Swan 57 and Tartan TOCK.

These are just a few that come to mind. I’m sure PS readers have many other boats to add to the list as evidence that reports on the death of the cruising ketch have been greatly exaggerated.

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1985 Dickerson 37 Aft Cockpit Ketch

  • Description

Seller's Description

The Dickerson 37 aft cockpit ketch is a handsome cruising vessel with many practical features; wide decks, safe bulwarks, nav station, large comfortable cockpit. New teak and holly sole with 7 coats of varnish. One of George Hazen’s best modern sailboat designs using state of the art computer technology with a modified full keel and skeg hung rudder provides exceptional sailing performance. Ideally designed for the shoals of the Chesapeake, the ICW, Florida and the Bahamas. A beautiful ketch at a reasonable price.

Equipment: Rebuilt Perkins Diesel (2020), new running rigging, new batteries, new cushions in cabin and cockpit, new SIMRAD NSS Evo 3 Nav System with autopilot w/9”touchscreen chart plotter on bulkhead, SIMRAD dome and SIMRAD wind speed and depth, rebuilt and restored overhead hatches in main cabin and V-berth, new aluminum 50 gallon fuel tank, new Raritan pressurized fresh water toilet with new 20 gallon holding tank, new Thurston/Quantum jib on Hood roller furler, new Thurston/Quantum canvas sail covers, Lewmar 44 2-speed self-tailing sheet winches, mast mounted halyard winches. U-shape galley, 3-burner propane stove w/ oven, refrigeration, hot/cold pressurized water, shore power connection. 120v outlets at nav station and galley, 30amp battery charger.

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

Aft and center cockpit, ketch or cutter.

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  1. SIENA Cruising Sailboat DICKERSON 37' 1986

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  2. 1981 Dickerson 37 Ketch for sale

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  3. DICKERSON 37 (FARR)

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  4. 1986 Dickerson 37 Sail Boat For Sale

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  5. SIENA Cruising Sailboat DICKERSON 37' 1986

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  6. 1986 Dickerson 37 Other for sale

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COMMENTS

  1. DICKERSON 37 AC

    It takes into consideration "reported" sail area, displacement and length at waterline. The higher the number the faster speed prediction for the boat. A cat with a number 0.6 is likely to sail 6kts in 10kts wind, a cat with a number of 0.7 is likely to sail at 7kts in 10kts wind. KSP = (Lwl*SA÷D)^0.5*0.5

  2. re Dickerson 37

    2 posts · Joined 2006. #6 · Nov 1, 2007. All D37's are fiberglass. Some rigged as ketches others as sloops/cutters. Built in Trappe, Md between 1981 and 1987. Perfect boat for the Chesapeake Bay or coastal Florida. At least 25 of them still documented. I wouldn't have anything else (well maybe a pristine Bermuda 40).

  3. Dickerson 37 Cutter

    Boat Review Forum. SailNet is a forum community dedicated to Sailing enthusiasts. Come join the discussion about sailing, modifications, classifieds, ... If you would really want a boat like the Dickerson 37 - you are getting older not younger. You need to get going faster not slower. Next year some older person will buy it and leave you at the ...

  4. $39,500USD OUTSTANDING BLUEWATER SAILBOAT! Dickerson 37 ...

    This week is a lovely sailboat for sale as a more traditional bluewater sailboat design that is built for bluewater ocean passages with a ketch rig and some ...

  5. Dickerson 37

    The Dickerson 37 is an American sailboat that was designed by George Hazen as a cruiser and first built in 1980. The design ... In a 1994 review Richard Sherwood wrote, "the overhangs and sheer have been deliberately designed for a traditional appearance, but the center cockpit and aft cabin are modern. ...

  6. Dickerson 37 CC

    Dickerson 37 CC is a 37′ 0″ / 11.3 m monohull sailboat designed by George Hazen and built by Dickerson Boatbuilders starting in 1980. ... Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay). D: ...

  7. Hi from a new Dickerson 37 owner

    The boat was very kitted up as purchased so last summer was spent enjoying. The previous owner left her on the hard for 2 years and the exterior varnish suffered. In a moment of weakness I decided to tackle all the interior varnish, so I removed almost all the interior joinery and finished it in my garage this winter.

  8. Dickerson 37 sailing performance

    Allow me to expand-Dickerson built 38 cruising Dickerson 37s. They also built several Farr designed 37s (IORC racers) outside this discussion. Of those 38 cruising boats, "about" 20 of them were aft cockpit sloops/cutters, and 18 were center cockpit ketches (Dickerson's preferred design). These numbers are approximate, because Dickerson ...

  9. 1984 DICKERSON 37 cruising her home waters of the Choptank ...

    27 votes, 12 comments. 432K subscribers in the sailing community. /r/Sailing is a place to ask about, share, show, and enjoy all about sailing, sail…

  10. Shakedown sail on the Chesapeake Bay, Dickerson 37. It's gonna ...

    341 votes, 20 comments. 199K subscribers in the sailing community. /r/Sailing is a place to ask about, share, show, and enjoy all about sailing, sail…

  11. 1986 Dickerson 37 37 Boats for Sale

    Vessel is currently a project boat! In late August, the price was dropped to 15,000 for a quick sale. The seller wants the boat sold as quick as possible and decided to make a significant price drop to facilitate. See broker notes for a list of possible projects. Celeste a 37' Dickerson, built in Trappe, Md off the Chesapeake Bay has long been ...

  12. For sale

    1986 Dickerson 37 AC. Location: Hingham, MA. Phone: 781 789-6008. Owner: Peter Owens aka Sailah. Price: $60,000. Official specs of Dickerson 37. Noted in Ferenc Mate's Worlds Best Sailboats. We are not getting the cruising time that I expected over last 2 years. Young kids and other competing interests.

  13. Dickerson 37 (Farr)

    Dickerson 37 (Farr) is a 37′ 6″ / 11.4 m monohull sailboat designed by Bruce Farr and built by Dickerson Boatbuilders starting in 1983. ... Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay). D: ...

  14. Dickerson Owners Association

    The event receives such rave reviews from attendees that the DOA will soon share it among a larger group of similar classic boats. ... keep your eyes peeled for a 30, 32, 35, 36, 37, 40 or 41 foot Dickerson sailboat. Get sailor's name, boat name, length, port and other contact information i.e. telephone number and email. Take a picture if ...

  15. DICKERSON 37 (FARR)

    It takes into consideration "reported" sail area, displacement and length at waterline. The higher the number the faster speed prediction for the boat. A cat with a number 0.6 is likely to sail 6kts in 10kts wind, a cat with a number of 0.7 is likely to sail at 7kts in 10kts wind. KSP = (Lwl*SA÷D)^0.5*0.5

  16. Dickerson Farr 37. I have questions

    G. gedaggett Discussion starter. 215 posts · Joined 2008. #1 · Sep 19, 2019. I have some questions for anyone who has experience sailing the Dickerson Farr 37. I have read through all of the previous posts on the matter but had some specific questions. 1. It has been said that the boat can be "alot to handle downwind".

  17. For Sale: 1986 Dickerson 37 AC

    1986 Dickerson 37 AC. Location: Hingham, MA. Phone: 781 789-6008. Owner: Peter Owens. Price: $60,000. We are not getting the cruising time that I expected over last 2 years. Young kids and other competing interests. Cruised boat in New England waters and it has spent most of its life in New England. Boat is hauled and stored behind my barn ...

  18. A One-sided Defense of the Cruising Ketch

    Impress your sloop-sailing friends with fancy ketch tricks. Sail backward through the mooring field (spin circles if you have a sharpie), nose casually up to anchor, hove-to with jig and jigger. Barrel westward on a reach. Turbo-charge off-wind sailing by setting a mizzen staysail. Don't fear a dismasting.

  19. 1985 Dickerson 37 Aft Cockpit Ketch

    The Dickerson 37 aft cockpit ketch is a handsome cruising vessel with many practical features; wide decks, safe bulwarks, nav station, large comfortable cockpit. New teak and holly sole with 7 coats of varnish. One of George Hazen's best modern sailboat designs using state of the art computer technology with a modified full keel and skeg hung ...

  20. Boat Reviews

    Boat reviews entirely based on the technical specifications, not flavoured by any persons opinions or preferences.

  21. Dickerson 37 boats for sale

    2024 Thor Lake Hammer 1754. US$28,999. Performance East Inc | Goldsboro, North Carolina. <. 1. >. * Price displayed is based on today's currency conversion rate of the listed sales price. Boats Group does not guarantee the accuracy of conversion rates and rates may differ than those provided by financial institutions at the time of transaction.