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The Ghosts of Christmas Yet to Come, ranked by freakiness

From Mickey Mouse to Muppets to Scrooged, Spirited, and the great classics

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You probably all know the story of Charles Dickens’ endlessly adapted 1843 holiday story A Christmas Carol , even if you’ve never read it. Tight-fisted, mean old miser Ebenezer Scrooge falls asleep on Christmas Eve and is visited by three spirits: the Ghost of Christmas Past, a man in a sleeping cap; the Ghost of Christmas Present, a rotund, jolly fellow; and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, a harrowing, silent specter of death. These three ghosts convince our miserly man to change his ways, but the third one does the heavy lifting, showing Scrooge how soon he’ll be dead and buried, while nobody mourns his passing.

In the text, Dickens describes the ghost as “shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible save one outstretched hand.” This leaves a lot of leeway for adaptations to interpret, and A Christmas Carol is one of the most-adapted works of fiction of all time.

So in the holiday spirit, I decided to watch every film version and evaluate them on one single criteria: How scary do they make the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come? Don your sleeping cap and come with us on a journey into holiday horror.

60. A Sesame Street Christmas Carol (2006)

A robot “ghost” that looks like an egg with a christmas wreath on it floats over grouch in Sesame Street Christmas Carol

If you were going into this one expecting to be spooked, I don’t know what to tell you. Oscar the Grouch as Scrooge contends with a CGI floating robot with googly eyes as the Ghost of Christmas Future. We get it, you don’t want to terrify the preschoolers, but there’s a reason it’s lowest on the list.

59. A Christmas Carol (1954)

A rave in a black and white image from A Christmas Carol (1954)

Fredric March stars as Scrooge in this, the first color televised version of the tale. Unfortunately, the only surviving version is a black and white kinescope. In a strange choice, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come doesn’t appear in human form at all. Instead, a myna bird caws Scrooge to the graveyard, where he finds not only his grave, but also Tiny Tim’s.

58. Christmas Cupid (2010)

Typical smug bastard dressed as santa in Christmas Cupid (2010)

Christina Milian is the Scrooge figure in this ABC Family holiday comedy, and the three ghosts are her ex-boyfriends. Depending on your relationship history, this might seem scarier than it is. The third ghost is her boss, who she is also dating, dressed up like Santa Claus. He tells her that in the terrible future to come, they get married, then divorced. Bummer. Fortunately, as part of amending her wicked ways after the ghostly visitation, she dumps him.

57. Ghosts of Girlfriends Past (2009)

A woman in a sparkly dress floats over the snowcovered woods in Ghosts of Girlfriends Past (2009)

It’s a stretch, but this Matthew McConaughey rom-com is based on the Dickens story, so it counts. The “Ghost of Girlfriends Future” that shows McConaughey’s womanizer protagonist Connor Mead the error of his ways is played by stunning Russian model Olga Maliouk, dressed in white rather than the traditional black cloak.

56. Rich Little’s Christmas Carol (1978)

scrooge in his old timely nightgown sitting on a desk next to Christmas Future, a man in a trenchcoat

It’s almost impossible to explain how popular comedic impersonator Rich Little was in the 1970s, but “HBO gave him a Christmas special in which he played every single role of A Christmas Carol as a different celebrity character” might do it. Scrooge is Rich Little as W.C. Fields, and the Ghost of Christmas Future is Little playing Peter Sellers as the Pink Panther movies’ Inspector Clouseau. So not scary, but extremely weird.

55. The Smurfs: A Christmas Carol (2011)

A smurfy finger points out from a dark cloak at another smurf in The Smurfs: A Christmas Carol (2011)

The real revelation here is that Grouchy Smurf (the Scrooge of the story) acts like a dick all the time because Papa Smurf gives him a hat every year for Christmas. The ghost is Hefty Smurf. Not scary unless you have a phobia of gym bros.

54. My Dad Is Scrooge (2014)

A dog stands on the carpet in My Dad Is Scrooge (2014)

This is probably the only Christmas Carol where Scrooge gets headbutted by a llama. Our miser here is a farmer named EB, who is taught the magic of the season by a trio of talking animals. The third one is a dog that hypnotizes EB . This thing is so cheap and weird that when the animals talk, it’s sometimes just their lips moving over a still photograph. The dog doesn’t even dress up!

53. A Christmas Carol: The Musical (2004)

A woman in white shredded robes does a luring hand gesture in A Christmas Carol: The Musical (2004)

This is a tough watch for numerous reasons, especially if you’re not a fan of Broadway musicals. Kelsey Grammer plays Scrooge, and he’s confronted by a white-clad Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come played by Geraldine Chaplin (Charlie Chaplin’s daughter, most recently seen in Netflix’s The Crown ). The costuming is pretty dire — she looks like she’s covered in damp toilet paper.

52. Chasing Christmas (2005)

A dorky guy with wavy hair and a red ascot stands next to a lit christmas tree in Chasing Christmas (2005)

Tom Arnold has tremendous divorced energy as the Scrooge figure in this mediocre comedy, where the Ghost of Christmas Past goes AWOL and leads him and the Ghost of Christmas Present through a series of scenes. Scrooge and the second spirit eventually make out, and there are a lot of cartoon sound effects. Yet to Come only shows up at the movie’s climax, and is just a sleazy-looking Euro guy in an ascot.

51. Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes Christmas (2006)

Taz emerges from the Christmas Future robes to scare Daffy Duck while the two stand in the snowy forest in Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes Christmas (2006)

Here, the ghost is the Tasmanian Devil. He starts out the scene in the typical black shroud, but doffs it a minute or so later to engage in the usual Warner Bros. schtick.

50. Carry on Christmas (1969)

A stereotypical afro sunglasses hippie wears a necklace of flowers in a black void

The long-running British slapstick film series tackled Dickens for a Christmas special at the end of the swinging ’60s, but the Ghost of Christmas Future is just actor Bernard Bresslaw playing an incredibly broad hippie impersonation. Oh, and Frankenstein and Dracula are also in this, for unexplained reasons.

49. It’s Christmas, Carol! (2012)

Carrie Fisher in black holds a black umbrella to cover a brunette woman from the rain in  It’s Christmas, Carol! (2012)

Carrie Fisher plays all three ghosts (and the Marley role to boot) in this Hallmark Channel take on A Christmas Carol set in the modern age. Emmanuelle Vaugier is the Scrooge figure, transformed into a hard-charging CEO with no time for Christmas. Not scary.

48. A Christmas Carol (2015)

A woman in a black veil stands behind a tree in A Christmas Carol (2015)

This extremely cheap-looking Canadian musical production of the story was a labor of love (director Anthony D.P. Mann also plays Scrooge), for what that’s worth. The Spirit of Christmas Yet to Come talks and sings in this rendition. She’s just a lady with a white face in a big black hat. The whole thing has a community theater vibe.

47. Brer Rabbit’s Christmas Carol (1992)

A jack o lantern head hides under a white blanket in Brer Rabbit’s Christmas Carol (1992)

The early ’90s were such a dire time for animation. This made-for-TV special — not produced by Disney, and with no connection to Disney’s Song of the South — is an ordeal to watch, and all the ghosts are just Brer Rabbit messing with Brer Fox through the use of household props and woodland actors. So the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come here is just a sheet on a mop with a jack-o’-lantern on top.

46. An American Christmas Carol (1979)

Henry Winkler in old age makeup playing Scrooge next to Dorian Harewood as Christmas Future

Henry Winkler — the Fonz himself — dons old-age makeup to portray Benedict Slade in this adaptation moved to Depression-era New England. The spirit who shows him the misery that awaits him after death is played with soulfulness by Dorian Harewood — the fill-in voice of Shredder from the Ninja Turtles cartoons!

45. A Christmas Carol (1969)

A 2D animated Ghost of Christmas Future points his bony finger in a graveyard in A Christmas Carol (1969)

From a series of Australian animated adaptations called Famous Classic Tales , this is a pretty standard take on the story, complete with a third ghost that could pass for an unimaginative Scooby-Doo villain.

44. A Christmas Carol (2000)

A bald man guides a red headed kid through a cemetery in A Christmas Carol (2000)

This odd British TV adaptation moves the action to the present day, with Ross Kemp playing Scrooge as a council-estate loan shark despised by his clients and community. The third spirit that visits him on Christmas Eve is an eerily silent young boy who shows him the bad end that awaits, and in the film’s coda, we learn that the kid was his yet-to-be-born child. In theory this could be scary, but it’s executed so clumsily that it’s more laughable than chilling.

43. Skinflint: A Country Christmas Carol (1979)

A cloaked man wearing a skeleton mask meets scrooge in Skinflint: A Country Christmas Carol (1979)

David Bond plays the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in this honky-tonk musical adaptation of the Dickens story, with Gremlins ’ Hoyt Axton in the Scrooge role. This was only aired once, during the late-’70s peak of Grand Ole Opry country music. Bond eschews the hood in favor of what looks like dollar-store Dracula makeup and some deeply weird hand gestures.

42. A Christmas Carol (1910)

A whispy ghost shows scrooge his gravestone

The oldest surviving film version of Dickens’ tale (except for the 1906 one, which didn’t have the three ghosts) is a 13-minute silent speedrun of the whole tale. The ghosts aren’t terribly scary, and as far as I can tell, the gimmick for the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is “big lady.”

41. A Flintstones Christmas Carol (1994)

A hooded ghost shows Fred Flinstone Scrooge his deathbed

This 70-minute animated take, featuring the usual Flintstones characters, depicts the ghost as a pretty generic hooded featureless figure. The one notable thing about this movie is that it actually shows Fred Flintstone’s corpse — or at least his massive, pale-white big toe sticking out from under a sheet.

40. The Stingiest Man in Town (1978)

A dimly lit ghost

A low-effort Rankin-Bass animated musical version of the classic story, with a hooded figure pointing a bony white arm at Scrooge’s tombstone. Perfectly competent, but nothing to write home about.

39. A Carol Christmas (2003)

A prison guard stands behind Tori Spelling

This Hallmark movie had some serious stunt casting — Gary Coleman as the Ghost of Christmas Past! William Shatner as the Ghost of Christmas Present! Storied actor James Cromwell is the third and final ghost, and his expressive face does a lot to sell it, even though he’s just a mute limo driver. The bit where he closes Carol (Tori Spelling) into her coffin is a little freaky.

38. Old Scrooge (1913)

A transluscent ghost freaks out scrooge

Ghosts in these early silent adaptations were always very tall. In this silent version of the tale, our future ghost is just a lanky fellow wrapped in some bedsheets. Marley is actually significantly scarier.

37. A Christmas Carol (1982)

A creepy hooded guy in The Stingiest Man in Town (1978)

I think this animated Australian version of the story is the baseline “solid C” for scariness. It’s not imaginative at all — if you’ve read this far, you’ve probably guessed that the ghost here is a big figure in a black cloak — but the rendering is fine, and the music really sells the scene. Perfectly decent but nothing to renounce your miserly ways over.

36. Scrooge & Marley (2012)

ghost of christmas future 1984

Chicago drag legend Jojo Baby plays the third ghost in this campy gay take on the tale, with Scrooge recast as a penny-pinching club owner visited by his deceased partner. Mr. Baby does a fine job, wrapped up in a mummy-like sheath of black fabric that casts a very glam silhouette.

35. Ebbie (1995)

ghost of christmas future 1984

A Lifetime original movie starring Susan Lucci as the first female Scrooge? Look for scares somewhere else, pal. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is played by busy Bill Croft, most notable for playing prison guards or convicts in shows like Airwolf and Viper . He’s just a quiet but imposing guy in a hat and a black trenchcoat.

34. A Christmas Carol (1997)

ghost of christmas future 1984

DIC was the go-to studio for affordable animation through much of the ’80s and ’90s, and this holiday special was as average as possible. Tim Curry plays Scrooge, and the adaptation gives him a bulldog named Debit because all cartoons must have a cute animal character. The ghost here is a glowing cloaked specter, nothing fancy or special, but it’s well designed.

33. A Diva’s Christmas Carol (2000)

ghost of christmas future 1984

Vanessa Williams plays “Ebony Scrooge” in this perplexing made-for-VH1 holiday movie, which also stars Duran Duran’s John Taylor and Chilli from TLC. The stunt casting could have gone any number of ways for the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, but for some reason, it’s a haunted television set showing an episode of Behind the Music where everybody talks about how much they hate Scrooge now that she’s dead. Then it sucks her in, Poltergeist -style. Extremely weird.

32. A Christmas Carol (1994)

ghost of christmas future 1984

Cheaply made animated special with the artwork done in Japan in a vaguely anime style. Our final ghost is a hooded figure wearing a rope as a belt. The whole enterprise is pretty artless and uninspired.

31. 2nd Chance for Christmas (2019)

Vivica A Fox looks shocked at an offscreen blonde

Direct-to-DVD (and streaming) cornball starring Brittany Underwood as a spoiled pop star in the Scrooge role. Vivica A. Fox is mostly wasted as the third ghost, credited as “Death” — she enters the scene in cloak and bones, inspiring Underwood to ask whether she “died at Comic-Con.” But she plays through the flick just as her normal, fine self.

30. Mickey’s Christmas Carol (1983)

ghost of christmas future 1984

Disney animated projects are occasionally pretty scary — even the Mickey Mouse stories . But the Ghost here is just frequent Mickey nemesis Peg-Leg Pete, wearing a brown shroud and puffing a stogie. It’s a testament to how good the framing and animation is that he still feels threatening. The addition of a cigar does explain the billows of smoke around the spirit.

29. An All Dogs Christmas Carol (1998)

ghost of christmas future 1984

The last film in the All Dogs Go to Heaven series has a convoluted plot about evil bulldog Carface scheming to hypnotize pets to steal Christmas presents. The good dogs dress up as the three spirits to change his ways, and the Ghost of Christmas Future starts off as an imposing hooded figure before whipping his cloak off to do a bizarre riff on Jim Carrey in The Mask . He does take Carface to literal hell, which is a little intense.

28. A Christmas Carol (1977)

A shadowy figure meets Scrooge in a graveyard covered in fog

Yet another BBC adaptation of the tale, with a perfectly acceptable shroud-clad spirit. He loses a few points because he doesn’t really seem to know what to do with his hands, leaving them hanging awkwardly while Scrooge monologues. But the massive hanging hood and creepy silence are both on point.

27. Una Meravigliosa Notte (1953)

ghost of christmas future 1984

I don’t speak Italian, so it’s difficult to evaluate how well the ghost comes off in this adaptation, which stars Paolo Stoppa as greedy Antonio Trabbi, visited by a trio of spirits who show him the error of his ways. This is the second film on this list where the ghost has no physical form, instead manifesting as an echoing voice-over. The cinematography does a lot to sell it, as Stoppa seems genuinely deranged and unsettled by the all-knowing voice in his head.

26. Ms. Scrooge (1997)

ghost of christmas future 1984

Cicely Tyson plays the Scrooge role in this gender-swapped version of the tale, in which the Ghost of Christmas Future warns her that the IRS will take all her money after she dies. He’s played by actor Julian Richings, who has a memorable face, but spends his whole part of the movie standing around expressionless in a suit. It’s just weird enough to be truly creepy.

25. A Christmas Carol (1938)

Scrooge barely sees the ghost of christmas yet to come hiding in a bush

One of the more famous adaptations, this one is solid, but the ghost is just a guy in a black cloak. When he walks, he sometimes sticks both of his arms out in front of him like Frankenstein’s monster. Every once in a while, you can see his weird skinny hand.

24. John Grin’s Christmas (1986)

A bald Black man lifts up his robe to reveal himself to Scrooge

This all-Black TV adaptation of the story has Robert Guillaume as the Scrooge figure John Grin, and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is played by Trinidadian dancer/actor Geoffrey Holder, probably best known as Baron Samedi in Live and Let Die . The costuming isn’t anything to write home about, but Holder’s expressive face and wild mannerisms definitely deliver.

23. Tales From Dickens: A Christmas Carol (1959)

A robed ghost points offscreen in a cemetery to direct a scrooge with long white hair

Early television programming didn’t have much to offer in terms of special effects, so the Ghost in this Basil Rathbone-starring adaptation is a black cloak walking around in some studio fog. Some nice stiff-armed pointing and a commitment to stillness and silence makes it one of the better of its type.

22. Scrooge (1951)

A hand raises in front of Scrooge who kneels on the ground

Alastair Sim is one of cinema’s most famous Scrooges, and he puts his whole back into cowering in fear of the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. It’s another shrouded figure, but its introduction is pretty good — a pale white hand held in the foreground of a shot for more than a minute as Scrooge freaks out. The best thing about this one is his implacability: None of Scrooge’s pleas move him in the slightest.

21. A Christmas Carol (1914)

A ghost appears next to a stone wall as Scrooge looks down at his feet

Another silent flim, this one running a little over 20 minutes. The ghost is a big guy in a black hood and cloak, played by the awesomely named and completely stone-faced H. Ashton Tonge. Charles Rock is an overacting machine as Scrooge, chewing scenery like it was a Christmas goose.

20. A Christmas Carol: Scrooge’s Ghostly Tale (2006)

A walrus ghost

This direct-to-video CGI animated film casts anthropomorphic animals in the lead roles. You will never in a million years guess what kind of animal the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is, so I’ll just spoil it for you: It’s a walrus with one broken tusk, crackling with some sort of eldritch electricity. It’s so inexplicable that it wraps around to being scary.

19. Scrooge (1922)

A transparent ghosts freaks out Scrooge in the graveyard

This is, chronologically, the first film that depicts the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come with its face fully shrouded, and it’s effective, even though the ghost is barely on screen for a minute in this silent short.

18. Ebenezer (1998)

A cloaked figure with long white hair walks on an old timely western street

Jack Palance as Ebenezer Scrooge in a version of the tale set in the Old West? Incredible, and the legendary actor goes wild as a card-cheating swindler who hates Christmas. The ghost here is a shrouded figure with some wisps of gray hair coming out from the cloak, and at the end of his scene, he reveals his face as Scrooge’s dead partner, Jacob Marlowe.

17. Mister Magoo’s Christmas Carol (1962)

The Ghost of CHristmas Future leads mr magoo blindly into the graveyard

The hapless blind codger has been cast as Ebenezer Scrooge in a theatrical adaptation of the Dickens story, possibly for insurance-fraud reasons. The third spirit is the stereotypical silent hooded shadowy figure, but animated in the classic UPA style, so it looks pretty cool and imposing. The original songs written for the movie and sung by Magoo kind of undercut the drama, though.

16. Scrooge (1935)

a shadowy hand points at something

The first feature-length Christmas Carol film with sound takes a pretty interesting approach with our third ghost, portraying him as an amorphous shadow that sometimes enfolds Scrooge, and at other times appears as a pointing finger cast on the snowy ground. Not super scary, but cool.

15. A Christmas Carol (1923)

A ghost appears in a burst of little lights in front of Scrooge

Another shadowy cloaked figure in this silent adaptation, but Russell Thorndike’s Scrooge sells the hell out of it well enough to bump it up a few spots.

14. A Christmas Carol (2012)

A bald bearded scrooge meets the ghost

This relatively obscure adaptation directed by Jason Figgis does some odd things with the source material, deliberately removing some scenes to make the narrative bleaker. It’s pretty low-budget and obviously shot on video with the actors in different rooms, overlaid with cheap digital effects, but it manages to work OK. The ghost has a red cloak and some gross zombie makeup on his outstretched hand, earning points for being different.

13. A Christmas Carol (2018)

A younger Scrooge looks up in the darkness of night

The introduction of the final spirit in this Scotland-set version is straight out of a horror movie, all ominous whooshing noises and creaking violins. But in a departure from the norm, we never actually see it. Instead, it speaks in one-word pronouncements in a gravelly voice as Scrooge reacts to it. Points for originality and solid sound design, but the actor playing Scrooge doesn’t sell it as well as he could.

12. Spirited (2022)

A cloaked ghost points his skeleton hand in a moonlit graveyeard

Will Ferrell and Ryan Reynolds mug it up in this comedy holiday musical made for Apple TV. It’s got good production values, and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, played by former Raptors power forward Loren Woods (but voiced by Tracy Morgan), makes the most of its few minutes on screen.

11. A Christmas Carol (1984)

A window illuminates the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

George C. Scott stars as Scrooge in one of the all-time best versions of the story, and the ghost is really solid — tattered, shadowy, silent, and imposing. Nothing particularly innovative about this rendition, but expertly executed.

10. Christmas Carol: The Movie (2001)

A skeleton’s visage melts into the Crachit family before a fully illuminated Scrooge

In general, this animated version of the story is pretty low-quality, even though the celebrity voice cast includes Kate Winslet and Nicolas Cage. But the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is handled pretty marvelously. Its depiction eschews realism: It’s drawn with sloppy brushstrokes outlining a cadaverous figure. It’s one of the few animated versions that really takes advantage of the medium, even if it’s just for a short time.

9. The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992)

A cloaked figure holds his hands at the graveyard gates as Scrooge approaches in The Muppet Christmas Carol

Michael Caine in a world full of Muppets is disconcerting enough, but this one takes a turn for the eerie when Scrooge runs into the third spirit — a huge figure clad in black robes, with an infinite, featureless void where its face should be. Not a lot of time on screen, but a really strong design.

8. Scrooge (1970)

A full-on skeleton Yet to Come ghost pokes Scrooge

For the first part of the ghost’s appearance in this musical (with Albert Finney as Scrooge), he’s the usual black-cloaked figure. But when Scrooge realizes he’s looking at his own grave, the Ghost reveals a skeletal face and hands that are simultaneously corny and disconcerting.

7. A Christmas Carol (2019)

Jason Flemyng playing a ghost of christmas yet to come with his mouth sewen shut and a top hat

Guy Pearce starred as Scrooge in this series, one of the darkest adaptations of Dickens ever. There’s even a sexual-abuse subplot to Scrooge’s childhood, along with several other adult themes. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is well played by British actor Jason Flemyng, who appears as a pallid man in a black suit and top hat with his mouth crudely sewn shut.

6. A Christmas Carol (2020)

A shadow monster grabs Scrooge

This ambitious dance film features celebrity voices and professional dancers. It’s one of the more visually compelling takes on the story, with some dynamic sets and beautiful motion. Both Bob Cratchit and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come are played by dancer Brekke Fagerlund Karl, who is magnificently threatening with his spare movements.

5. A Christmas Carol (1971)

graves pop up all around scrooge

Legendary animator Richard Williams won an Oscar for this brilliant adaptation, which is just tremendous from start to finish. The ghost is a hooded figure, as per normal, but the incredible fluidity of the drawings here gives it an uncanny hyperrealism. Coupled with some unsettling camera movement, the design gives us a very high placer.

4. A Christmas Carol (1999)

A ghost of christmas yet to come with a brown robe and jawa eyes

The Patrick Stewart-led Christmas Carol was the first Scrooge story to use digital special effects. Our Ghost here is played by British actor Tim Potter, but we don’t really see him. Instead, it’s a baleful black shroud with two unsettling amber eyes buried within. Sometimes the primitive VFX of this period could be really effective, and this is a great example.

3. A Christmas Carol (2009)

a growing dark shadow ghost

I’m not the biggest fan of Robert Zemeckis’ motion-capture animated films, as they always veer a little too far into the uncanny valley for comfort. But you can’t deny that the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in his holiday effort is effective. CGI lets the spirit be a creature of pure shadow, changing size at will for some truly impressive effects.

2. Scrooged (1988)

a bunch of dead melty face spirits trapped in the skeletal chest of the ghost in Scrooged

Bill Murray meeting the hulking Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come in the elevator is one of many great scenes in this classic ’80s dram-com. Then the ghost opens the front of his cloak to reveal tormented souls trapped in his ribcage, and forces Bill Murray to experience his own cremation. A great fusion of the traditional and the contemporary, and it’s definitely scary!

1. A Carol for Another Christmas (1964)

Robert Shaw in a cloak in A Carol for Another Christmas

Leave it to Twilight Zone creator Rod Serling to max out the scare factor. This adaptation stars Sterling Hayden as industrialist Daniel Grudge, who is visited by three ghosts attempting to argue him out of his isolationist policies. The third ghost is played by Robert Shaw, who isn’t that scary on his own — until you realize that the “future” he’s showing Grudge is a world ravaged by nuclear armageddon and senseless, murderous violence. Shadowy figures and impending death are typically scary enough to turn a Scrooge around, but the threat of global thermonuclear war? That’s enough to save a whole lifetime of Christmases.

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The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

  • View history
  • 1.1 Physical appearance
  • 1.2 Personality
  • 2 Role in the film
  • 3.1 The Muppet Christmas Carol
  • 3.2 DuckTales (2017)
  • 4 Disney characters portraying Christmas Yet to Come
  • 7 External links

Background [ ]

Physical appearance [ ].

In the original Charles Dickens novel, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is described as thus:

Much like the Ghost of Christmas Present, every iteration of Yet to Come retains the basic appearance of a dark hooded figure with virtually little to no changes between the versions. The 2009 version keeps his typical appearance, but is sometimes portrayed as a shadow against the wall or ground, The Muppet version's hands are more deathly blue looking hands, while the DuckTales version has a noticeable beak carcass-like mouth sticking out from his hood and, to reaffirm him as the image of Death, carries a scythe with him.

Personality [ ]

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come does not speak, resulting in his actions being interpreted by whoever is being confronted by him. He is the most direct of the spirits and does not waste time with showing Scrooge how his death will affect the people around him. It is possible that the spirit is sinister in his motives as he did threaten to take Scrooge away that very night if he did not mend his ways. The DuckTales version implies that his silence is due to the fact that he is shy, particularly around Bentina Beakley who clearly has a crush on him, which he reciprocates.

Role in the film [ ]

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is initially a dark shadow on a wall, but when he comes out of the walls, he looks like the Grim Reaper. Scrooge states to the ghost that he "fears him more than any specter he has seen". Unlike the other two ghosts, this one doesn't speak. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is also the most phantom-like of the ghosts.

Occasionally, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come rides a Phantom Hearse and chases Scrooge throughout London on it. One chase sequence sees Scrooge shrunk to the size of a rat after the ghost cracks his whip, creating a shockwave in doing so.

Appearances in Disney media [ ]

The muppet christmas carol [ ].

The Ghost is the final spirit and shows Scrooge a vision of his unmourned death in the near future, as well as the death of Tiny Tim . In this movie, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is a large, faceless wraith.

The specter scares Charles Dickens and Rizzo ; they exit the movie and don't appear again until Scrooge returns to the present.

DuckTales (2017) [ ]

A version of the Ghost of Christmas Future appears in the 2017 reboot of DuckTales in the episode " Last Christmas! ". He is mostly silent with just a few occasional grunts and resembles a carcass more than a skeleton.

He, along with the Ghosts of Christmas Past and Future visit Scrooge McDuck every year just to hang out after accidentally visiting him instead of Ebenezer Scrooge. The group takes Scrooge to his first Christmas party held at McDuck Manor where Future ends up dancing with Bentina Beakley who seems to legitimately like him.

He later attends Scrooge McDuck's Christmas party back in the present where Beakley remembers her time dancing with him, causing him to blush.

Disney characters portraying Christmas Yet to Come [ ]

  • Pete - Portrayed the role in Mickey's Christmas Carol .
  • Spot Chicken - Portrayed the role in the 101 Dalmatians: The Series episode " A Christmas Cruella ".
  • The Old Hag - Portrayed the role in An Adaptation of Dickens' Christmas Carol, Performed by The Walt Disney Players .
  • Narrator - Portrayed the role in Winnie the Pooh: Springtime with Roo .

Gallery [ ]

Carol-disneyscreencaps com-7906

  • Rutger Hauer was to play the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come in the Fox/Disney miniseries A Christmas Carol . But due to health reasons, Hauer was replaced by Jayson Flemyng, who played the role in 2019 .
  • The Ghost of Yet to Come in the movie of the novel in 2009 was far more dangerous making as it toyed with Scrooge before showing the future.

External links [ ]

WikipediaListLink

  • 2 Once Upon a Studio

Spirit of Christmas Yet to Come

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Appearance [ ]

"The Phantom slowly, gravely, silently, approached. When it came near him, Scrooge bent down upon his knee; for in the very air through which this Spirit moved it seemed to scatter gloom and mystery. It was shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible save one outstretched hand."

-Description in book Timothee Chalamet

  • 2 Fan Scrooge
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All The Ghosts Of Christmas Yet To Come, Ranked By Scariness

Sarah Blumert

Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol  has been a mainstay of the holiday season for generations. The heartwarming tale of an elderly miser learning the true meaning of Christmas is ingrained in everyone's minds, and for over a century, filmmakers have been adapting the tale for screens both big and small. 

One of the most pivotal figures of A Christmas Carol is the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, who shows Ebenezer Scrooge dark visions of what may come to pass - for both himself and those around him - if he refuses to give up his greedy ways. The ghost usually appears as a tall, skeletal figure in a flowing dark cloak. Rather than speaking to Scrooge like its Past and Present counterparts, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come gestures silently towards the unfolding action, allowing Scrooge to see firsthand the horrors his actions may bring.

Each Christmas Carol adaptation lends itself to a new and freshly terrifying version of the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, but which is the most frightening of all? 

Scrooged (1988)

Scrooged (1988)

In this '80s modernization starring Bill Murray, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is an enormous skeletal figure in a tattered, hooded robe. When Scrooge stand-in Frank Cross pulls the spirit's robe aside, he sees a ribcage trapping screaming, tormented creatures within.

A Christmas Carol (1984)

A Christmas Carol (1984)

This made-for-TV adaptation starring George C. Scott keeps its portrayal of the final spirit classic and sinister with a mysterious figure cloaked in darkness. This Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come has perhaps the most dramatic entrance of the bunch, with striking back lighting and an eerie choir announcing its arrival.

The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992)

The Muppet Christmas Carol (1992)

The Muppets' adaptation of Dickens's story pulls no punches with its Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come - the specter is tall, silent, long-limbed, and draped in an ominous shroud.

A Christmas Carol (1999)

A Christmas Carol (1999)

This made-for-TV A Christmas Carol starring Patrick Stewart uses the classic cloaked-figure model for its Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, but it ups the ante with a pair of piercing yellow eyes staring out from the spirit's empty black hood.

A Christmas Carol (2009)

A Christmas Carol (2009)

Disney's motion-capture adaptation of A Christmas Carol depicts the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come as a shadowy, shape-shifting mass that leads Scrooge on a horrifying journey through the streets of London. As Scrooge is about to plummet into his grave, the spirit reveals his skeletal face and piercing, glowing eyes.

Scrooge (1970)

Scrooge (1970)

This musical adaptation of A Christmas Carol first portrays the final ghost as a billowing black robe with no features - until it reveals its true skeletal form when it condemns Scrooge for his greed.

Scrooge (1951)

Scrooge (1951)

This version of the story, released as  A Christmas Carol  in the US, portrays the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come as a tall, mysterious figure in black robes. His ghostly white hand guides Scrooge on the last leg of his journey.

A Christmas Carol (1910)

A Christmas Carol (1910)

In one of the earliest film adaptations of Dickens's classic tale, the final ghost of Christmas appears as a nearly transparent specter in flowing, gauzy robes. 

A Christmas Carol (1938)

A Christmas Carol (1938)

This version of Dickens's story is one of the first adaptations to present Scrooge's final visitor as a faceless, gaunt figure in dark, flowing robes.

A Christmas Carol (1971)

A Christmas Carol (1971)

This Academy Award-winning TV special used the classic model of a silent cloaked figure for the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. 

Mickey's Christmas Carol (1983)

Mickey's Christmas Carol (1983)

Disney's adaptation of the Christmas tale portrays the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come as a gargantuan, cigar-smoking figure draped in brown robes. As Scrooge is about to fall into his fiery grave, the spirit removes his hood, revealing himself as Pete.

Scrooge (1935)

Scrooge (1935)

In this Christmas Carol  adaptation starring Seymour Hicks, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come appears as a shadowy hand that points Scrooge towards his grim fate.

A Christmas Carol (1997)

A Christmas Carol (1997)

This 1997 animated adaptation, starring Tim Curry as the voice of Scrooge, personifies Christmas Yet to Come as a dark, robed specter emitting a glowing purple aura.

Mister Magoo's Christmas Carol (1962)

Mister Magoo's Christmas Carol (1962)

In this 1960s cartoon adaptation, Scrooge's final visitor is a ghostly floating cloak with skeletal hands.

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The Many Ghosts of ‘A Christmas Carol’

The many ghosts of ‘a christmas carol’ – yet to come.

by Lallen | Dec 22, 2017

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

“why show me this, if i am past all hope””.

Out of all the ghosts that visited Scrooge that dark cold night, the third to appear was the one he feared the most. Appearing from the thick mist, draped in long robes, it’s face covered in shadow, and only a solemn hand visible, it pointed Scrooge onward towards the future. 

lifting up his eyes, beheld a solemn Phantom, draped and hooded, coming, like a mist along the ground, towards him.

1938 – D’Arcy Corrigan

D'Arcy Corrigan - A Christmas Carol (1938) - The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come - The Many Ghosts of ‘A Christmas Carol’

D’Arcy Corrigan appears in the 1938 film adaption as the Ghost of Christmas Future. This spirit is dressed in a tight fitted black robe and walks around like a man. The spirit does not show it’s face, only points with it’s cloak and hand. Reginald Owen’s Ebenezer Scrooge is already a changed man at this point, and this encounter is nothing more than continuity of the story. 

1951 – Czeslaw Konarski

Czeslaw Konarski - A Christmas Carol (1951) - The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come - The Many Ghosts of ‘A Christmas Carol’

Alastair Sim’s Ebenezer Scrooge is not a changed man, on meeting the last of the three ghosts. He feels that he is too old and just wants to go back to bed. But the hooded figure, played by Czeslaw Konarski, points Scrooge onward to his destiny, unmoved by Scrooges pleas. This spirit floats along the ground, rather than walks and the film concentrates on it’s hand rather than it’s vacant blank face. It’s a foreboding and dark portrayal, mostly because the film rarely shows the figure in full, just parts of the spirit, hiding any human aspects to the character.

1984 –  Michael Carter

Michael Carter - A Christmas Carol (1984) - The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come - The Many Ghosts of ‘A Christmas Carol’

Michael Carter, most famous for playing Bib Fortuna in Return of the Jedi, takes on the cloaked spirit of Christmas Yet To Come. The shaky handed spook has little to say and is an ominous shape in the 1984 adaption of A Christmas Carol. The ghost never moves on screen, instead the cameras movements simply reveal the spirit standing in place as Scrooge moves around the scene. His one good hand pointing the way to Scrooge’s redemption. Revealed fully cloaked, his face and features hidden in shadow and surrounded by a spooky mist, this ghost is one of the more ominous forms in cinema.

1988 – Robert Hammond

Robert Hammond - A Christmas Carol (1988) - The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come - The Many Ghosts of ‘A Christmas Carol’

The last of the ghosts to haunt Frank Cross, is the Ghost of Christmas Future. This spirit appears as a giant cloaked figure, with either a creepy skull or a video screen for a face. It has skeletal hands in which it points with and floats along the ground and it’s certainly the most terrifying version of the ‘Ghost of Christmas yet to Come’.

1992 – R obert Tygner

Robert Tygner - A Christmas Carol (1992) - The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come - The Many Ghosts of ‘A Christmas Carol’

Robert Tygner takes on the role as the cloaked and spooky, Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, in the Muppet’s Christmas Carol. This giant and imposing specter wears a long flowing black cloak and has bony white hands. His face is shrouded in shadow. This spirit literal twists time around itself and scrooge as they journey through time. 

1999 – Tim Potter

Tim Potter - A Christmas Carol (1999) - The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come - The Many Ghosts of ‘A Christmas Carol’

Tim Potter plays the “third Spirit” in the 1999 film adaption, appearing as a glowing eyed, cloaked figure. Patrick Stewart’s Ebenezer Scrooge seems keen to get the haunting over with, as he urges the spirit to lead on. The ghost shows a single bony hand with long fingernails, pointing towards Scrooges destination. The inclusion of the glowing eyes does nothing to improve the apparitions appearance, but it does make it unique out of all the others in the list. 

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Ho Ho Ho….

The Many Ghosts Of A Christmas Carol – Select a page below!

“Ho Ho Ho Merry Humbug fellow Horror Fans. Scrooge does have a happy ending, repenting his old ways and finding a new place in his heart for his friends and family. It was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well, if any man alive possessed the knowledge. May that be truly said of us, and all of us! And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God Bless Us, Every One!

Keep Merry”

“Morti” The Mortician

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A Christmas Carol - Full Cast & Crew

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Adaptation of the classic Dickens tale of miserly Ebenezer Scrooge, who is visited by the ghosts of past, present and future Christmases.

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Executive producer, cinematographer, production company, art director, sound effects, special effects, production designer.

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

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TheGhostofChristmasYettoCome

Scrooge and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. Original illustration by John Leech (1843)

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come , also known as the Ghost of Christmas Future , is a character from Charles Dickens 's A Christmas Carol .

Role in the story [ ]

The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is the third and final ghost who haunts the miser Ebenezer Scrooge , in order to prompt him to adopt a more caring attitude in life and avoid a horrid afterlife like the Jacob Marley now suffers. Scrooge finds him the most fearsome of the spirits; he appears to Scrooge as a figure entirely muffled in a black hooded robe, except for a single gaunt hand with which he points. Although the character never speaks in the story, Scrooge understands him, usually rough assumptions from his previous experiences and rhetorical questions. The Ghost's general appearance suggests that he may be associated with the Grim Reaper. The Ghost's muteness and undefined features (being always covered by his robe) may also have been intended to represent the uncertainty of the future. Even in satires and parodies of the tale, this spirit nonetheless retains his original look.

When the Ghost appears, the first thing he shows Scrooge is three wealthy gentlemen making light of a recent death, who remark that it will be a cheap funeral, if anyone comes at all. One businessman said he would go only if lunch is provided, while another said he didn't eat lunch or wear black gloves, so there was no reason for him to appear at this funeral. Next, Scrooge is shown the same dead person's belongings being stolen and sold to a receiver of stolen goods called Old Joe. He also sees a shrouded corpse, which he implores the Ghost not to unmask, and a poor, debtor family rejoicing that someone to whom they owed money is dead. After pleading to the Ghost to see some tenderness connected with death, Scrooge is shown Bob Cratchit and his family mourning Tiny Tim 's passing. (In the prior visitation, the Ghost of Christmas Present states that Tiny Tim's illness was not inherently fatal, but implies that the meager income Scrooge provided to Bob Cratchit did not provide funds for proper treatment.) Scrooge is then taken to an unkempt graveyard, where he is shown his own grave, and realizes that the dead man of whom the others spoke ill was himself.

This visit sets up the climax of the novella at the end of this stave. Moved to an emotional connection to humanity and chastened by his own avarice and isolation by the visits of the first two spirits, Scrooge is horrified by the prospect of a lonely death and by implication a subsequent damnation. In desperation, he queries the Ghost:

And in an epiphany in which he understands the changes that the visits of the three ghosts have wrought in him, Scrooge exclaims: "I am not the man I was. I will not be the man I must have been but for this intercourse. Why show me this, if I am past all hope!...I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone!"

His transformation complete, Scrooge is ready to re-enter the world of humanity as he does in the story's denouement in the final stage.

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Film / A Christmas Carol (1984)

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A Christmas Carol is a 1984 made-for-TV film adaptation of the novel of the same name , directed by Clive Donner. It stars George C. Scott as Ebenezer Scrooge, the man who thinks Christmas is "humbug" until he's visited by three ghosts with an agenda. It was released in cinemas in the UK, where it was also filmed.

David Warner , who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a major Playing Against Type moment as gentle, kindly Bob Cratchit. Susannah York plays Mrs. Cratchit. Edward Woodward goes from avuncular to terrifying as the Ghost of Christmas Present. Roger Rees plays Fred, and also provides the opening and closing narration. A young Joanne Whalley appears in one scene as Scrooge's sister Fan, and Frank Finlay appears as Jacob Marley. Michael Gough is one of the businessmen soliciting for the poor.

Clive Donner worked as an editor in the famous 1951 version of the story.

This film provides examples of:

  • Abusive Parents : Scrooge's father might be his Freudian Excuse , though Scrooge never relies on his actions to justify his behavior.
  • Acid Reflux Nightmare : Ebenezer initially is prepared to dismiss Marley's appearance as this.
  • This version of Scrooge comes across as a great deal colder than the original. Rather than being indifferent he seems to find the suffering of others darkly amusing. He also makes more efforts to defend himself from the spirits than in most versions. All in all he is a great deal grouchier and more like his past self throughout nearly his entire time with the Spirits than in the book, where his transformation begins almost immediately on being transported back to the first vision of Christmas Past.
  • Scrooge's father also gets this. As in the book, Fan tells young Scrooge that their father has changed and wishes him home. When Scrooge meets him, however, he's still cold and dismissive of his son and only sees him for three days before making him work at Fezziwig's.
  • The touching scene where Scrooge comes to Fred's house to accept his invitation for Christmas dinner at last, fearful that he would be rejected, only to find he needn't have doubted Fred's love.
  • This version also fills in some backstory. The reason why young Ebenezer was essentially abandoned at boarding school is because his mother died in childbirth and his father blamed him. (This required an Age Lift to make Fan Ebenezer's older sister instead of his younger as in the book.) Scrooge's feeling that he wasn't wealthy enough to support Belle is here presented as why he threw himself so single-mindedly into making money.
  • This version has Scrooge meet Belle at Fezziwig's Christmas ball. In the original story, we don't meet Belle until the breakup scene. (This particular change is so common to adaptations of the book that it verges on Canon Immigrant .)
  • There's a scene early in the movie where Scrooge meets Tiny Tim outside the office and rudely dismisses him as a beggar, not knowing that Tim is waiting for his father.
  • The Ghost of Christmas Present shows Scrooge a little camp of homeless people that includes a desperate family of four. This serves as a segue to the scene with Ignorance and Want.
  • The movie includes a scene showing what a ruthless businessman Scrooge is, where he price gouges a group of other businessmen at the 'Change who are providing for the poor and need corn stocks he has purchased.
  • Affluent Ascetic : As in the novel, Scrooge is very wealthy but only spends the bare minimum to keep himself alive, and considers even basic comforts like good food to be frivolities. Lampshaded by his nephew: Fred: His wealth is of no use to him. He doesn’t do any good with it. He doesn’t even make himself comfortable with it‘
  • Age Lift : Fan was Scrooge's younger sister in the book, but his older sister here.
  • The Aloner : Scott's interpretation of Scrooge, which is consistent with the novel's descriptions of him and his house.
  • Bad Future : It certainly is for the Cratchits, who are mourning Tiny Tim's death when Scrooge encounters them in the future. Doubly bad since Christmas Present had threatened exactly that earlier. Also for Scrooge himself, who sees that unless he changes, he will die alone , neglected and unmourned.
  • Bob Cratchit, briefly, in the vision of Christmas Yet to Come.
  • Scrooge, when he brushes the snow off the gravestone and his worst fear is confirmed.
  • Carpet of Virility : The Ghost of Christmas Present's exposed hairy chest fits in well with his overt manliness and eventually serves to help make him more intimidating.
  • Christmas Carolers : Right before Marley shows.
  • Cobweb of Disuse : The ringer on Scrooge's doorbell is covered in cobwebs, implying that no one ever calls and Scrooge is too cheap to hire a maid.
  • Creepy Child : Ignorance and Want.
  • Creepy Monotone : Downplayed . While furious, Marley's lamentation of his wasted life has a slight, detached evenness; implying a near-deranged desolation.
  • Cruel to Be Kind : The motivations of the three spirits and Marley. The Ghost of Christmas Present in particular seems to almost enjoy throwing Scrooge's words back in his teeth.
  • The Ghost of Christmas Present.
  • The Ghost of Christmas Past can also be snarky, and even cruel.
  • Scrooge has his moments, such as when he tells the third ghost, "You're devilish hard to have a conversation with."
  • Death by Childbirth : Scrooge's mother died giving birth to him, leading to a troubled relationship with his father.
  • Delicate and Sickly : Tiny Tim, who would have died if Scrooge had not made his Heel–Face Turn .
  • Diegetic Soundtrack Usage : God Bless Us Everyone is among the various songs the Christmas carolers sing, and is also the tune Scrooge's watch makes when it chimes.
  • Don't You Dare Pity Me! : When Belle's husband tells her about Scrooge working alone and miserable, she's quite saddened by the life he has made for himself. Ebenezer snaps that he doesn't need her pity before Christmas Past helpfully reminds him that Belle can't hear him.
  • Dying Alone : Scrooge's fate without the Heel–Face Turn .
  • Establishing Character Moment : The Ghost of Christmas Present first appears to Scrooge in good cheer - as per his usual portrayal - laughing wildly and surprising Scrooge of his "family:" the ghosts of over a thousand Christmases hence. However, once Scrooge comments on his family in terms of business - "a great many mouths to provide for" - the tone changes and Christmas Present's manner instantly drops. Though he doesn't comment, he turns hard and cold and he immediately gets down to business, foreshadowing the nature of their conversations going forward.
  • Exact Words : In the future, Scrooge demands to see someone who feels "emotion" at the mysterious man's death (knowing deep down that the man is himself). The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come promptly takes him to see Mrs. Dilber happily selling the dead man's belongings that she stole. Scrooge then demands to see "tenderness and depth of feeling" instead. The Ghost complies... but the tenderness and depth of feeling he shows isn't for Scrooge, but for Tiny Tim as the Cratchits mourn his death. Last but not least, after this scene, Scrooge demands to be taken "home"... and the Ghost takes him to his own grave.
  • Fell Asleep Crying : After the visit to his own future grave, Scrooge finds himself back in his bedroom at night, rather than on Christmas morning as in most versions. The scene ends with Scrooge kneeling beside his bed in tears as he repeats his vow to change his life. Cut to the next morning, and Scrooge wakes up still on his knees, slumped against the bed, implying that he cried himself to sleep.
  • Fell Off the Back of a Truck : The homeless father is adamant that he did not steal the potatoes he's feeding his family with. They fell off a cart into the road, end of discussion. Father: Your father's not a thief, girl. Not yet...
  • Foreshadowing : The last simile thrown out in Fred's game is "Silent as the grave," shortly before the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come arrives.
  • For Doom the Bell Tolls : The film starts with a rather ominous tolling church bell, before more cheery Christmas bells are heard. Then there's the clock somewhere that tolls 1 and 2 o'clock ominously, to introduce the first two Christmas spirits.
  • Good Is Not Soft : The three spirits have Scrooge's best interest at heart, and are good, but in no way are they soft. Past and Present frequently criticize and debate with Scrooge, while the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come resembles the Grim Reaper personified and lets his future speak for itself.
  • Greek Chorus : The brass band carolers as Scrooge heads from his office to the London Exchange to his home: Brass band carolers: [singing] He strove for silver in his heart, and gold in all his days, His reason weak, his anger sharp, and sorrow all his pay, He went to church but once a year, and that was Christmas day, So grant us all a change of heart, Rejoice for Mary's son, Pray peace on Earth to all mankind, God bless us, every one.
  • Happily Married : After leaving Scrooge, Belle marries a kindhearted man and has many children. Bob and Mrs. Cratchit, Fred and his wife, and Mr. and Mrs. Fezziwig are also examples.
  • Happy Dance : Scrooge dances around his room in delirious happiness once he realizes he still has time to change his life and avoid all the misery he would otherwise have caused.
  • Hearing Voices : On his way home through the fog; before his haunted doorknocker and in his dark chambers, Scrooge hears the distant voice of his seven-years-dead partner Marley.
  • Heel–Face Turn : The entire purpose (and result) of Marley and the Ghosts' visits.
  • Inspirationally Disadvantaged : Tiny Tim is the kind that exists to be a shining example of virtue and then die , although Scrooge's change of heart saved him from the second half of that.
  • Ironic Echo : At one point in the film, Scrooge states that it would be better for the poor to die and reduce the population. The Ghost of Christmas Present then uses the exact same statement Scrooge had said against him when they both witness how ill Tiny Tim is.
  • I Want My Beloved to Be Happy : One of Belle's reasons for leaving Scrooge. She realizes that the now-mercenary Scrooge will regret marrying a girl without fortune.
  • Scrooge dismissed Christmas as "a false, commercial enterprise." He said this in the 1800's, before Christmas was particularly commercialized. Considering what it's turned into today, he's pretty accurate.
  • Scrooge doesn't believe the poor should suffer, he just believes that caring for them is the government's job and his only responsibility as an individual is to pay taxes. He's oblivious to the fact that the social safety nets at the time were insufficient at best and cruel at worst, but his underlying principle is reasonable.
  • Jump Scare : When Scrooge sits down with his evening gruel, he suddenly again hears Marley's discarnate voice.
  • Kick the Dog : The exchange between Scrooge and Tiny Tim at the beginning of the film: Tiny Tim: [as Scrooge comes out of the office into the freezing cold] Merry Christmas, Mr Scrooge! Scrooge: Don't beg on this corner, boy. Tiny Tim: I'm not begging, sir, I am Tim — Tim Cratchit. I am waiting for my father. Scrooge: [snorts] Tim Cratchit? Hm. Then you will have a long wait, won't you? Tiny Tim: Merry Christmas, sir. Scrooge: [walking off] Humbug.
  • Literal Genie : The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come does this when Scrooge begs him to "take him home." He takes him to the grave he's buried in, since that's his 'home' now.
  • Maternal Death? Blame the Child! : In this version, the reason why Scrooge's father has essentially abandoned his son at boarding school, as Scrooge tells the Ghost of Christmas Past. (This required making Fan his older sister, when Dickens states specifically that Fan is younger than Ebenezer.)
  • Mood Whiplash : At least twice. We go from hearing carolers to hearing Marley's creepy voice as Scrooge walks home. Then, in Christmas Present, we go straight from Fred's family Christmas party to a deserted part of London, where a family with two kids is living on the street.
  • Monochrome Apparition : Marley appears in an overall tone of deathly greyish blue.
  • Moral Myopia : Scrooge asks rhetorically "What have I done to deserve being abandoned like this?" when the Ghost of Christmas Present leaves him stranded alone at night in a strange, run-down, and possibly dangerous part of the city. In fact, the ghost had simply treated Scrooge with exactly the same sort of cold, callous disregard with which Scrooge himself treated all other people.
  • Mythology Gag : While walking home, Scrooge sees a ghostly hearse drive by him and vanish into the fog. This is very similar to a scene in the book, where he sees a hearse climbing the stairs of his house as he himself ascends.
  • Fred's last name becomes somewhat of a Meaningful Name ; he is the only child of Scrooge's sister Fan (the Well of Holiness in Scrooge's life), and Scrooge finally realizes how much of his mother Scrooge sees in him.
  • Not Even Bothering with the Accent : Scott simply uses his own American accent. It works in favor of the film by averting the distraction of faking an accent.
  • The other wandering spirits aren't seen, but are heard in the form of shrieks coming from outside Scrooge's window.
  • The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is hooded, silent, and usually seen from a distance or by shadow. The only hint of its body we see is one of its hands, which has unusually long fingers.
  • A similar case happens with its seeming lack of arrival. Marley tells Scrooge that the third ghost "will come in his own due time", instead of the previous 1 o'clock, 2 o'clock pattern. Scrooge is not even returned to his bedroom when the Ghost of Christmas Present leaves, causing him to fear that the third ghost might not even appear and that Scrooge has been left to freeze.
  • This reaction is clear in Bob Cratchit's expression when he realizes he's late to work on the 26th and Scrooge is in the counting house waiting for him.
  • Done subtly with Scrooge. When he sees the old lady selling the stuff she took from the dead man's room, he indignantly says "Those are my things!" Moments later, after the implications of that fact hit home, he backtracks, saying that they just look like his things.
  • Ominous Fog : A lot of this to set the mood, like when Scrooge is going back to his empty house and he starts hearing spooky voices and sees a ghost hearse.
  • Parlor Games : The guests at Fred's Christmas party are playing "Similes". Fred says the first part of a common expression, such as "Quiet as..." or "Tight as...", which the player then has to fill in ('a mouse' and 'a drum', respectively). The answer given, though, is "Tight as your Uncle Ebenezer's purse strings."
  • Pay Evil unto Evil : The Ghosts of Christmas Past and Present do not waste a single opportunity to blast Scrooge for his cruelty, delusions or stupidity. Past seems alien enough that she really might not be doing it on purpose, but Present seems to especially enjoy taking the piss out of him.
  • Pragmatic Villainy : Scrooge's reasoning for not putting more coal on the fire is pure business, as clothes are practical, cheap, and made for warming oneself while coal burns, is finite, and expensive.
  • Proud Peacock : While Scrooge is at his nephew's house, his nephew plays a word game with his guests. One of the answers is 'proud as a peacock."
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech : The Ghost of Christmas Present ends up delivering this to Scrooge. Ebenezer Scrooge: You use my own words against me? Ghost of Christmas Present: Yes! So perhaps, in the future, you will hold your tongue until you have discovered where the surplus population is, and who it is. It may well be that, in the sight of Heaven, you are more worthless and less fit to live than millions like this poor man's child.
  • The Remake : Well, all the many many versions of this story are working off the same original text. But this film has many points in common with the 1951 film Scrooge on which Clive Donner worked as an editor. It has a similar Off-into-the-Distance Ending with Scrooge and Tiny Tim as in the 1951 film. Both films have Scrooge younger than Fan (the reverse of the book) and both suggest that Scrooge's mother's death in childbirth is why his father abandoned him. Both include the idea that Scrooge set himself to work in business because he was Unable to Support a Wife and wanted to marry Belle. Both have Scrooge apologize to Fred's wife.
  • Replacement Goldfish : The man Belle ended up marrying after leaving Scrooge looks just like his past self.
  • Sarcasm Mode : The Ghost of Christmas Present really leans into this when throwing Scrooge's "Are there no workhouses? Are there no prisons?" line back at him, after Scrooge wonders why no one will help Ignorance and Want.
  • Scenery Porn : Location footage in Shropshire makes for an atmospherically Victorian setting.
  • See You in Hell : Inverted with Scrooge when Fred comes to his office to invite Scrooge to Christmas dinner: Fred: Please don't be angry, uncle. Come, dine with us tomorrow. Scrooge: [chuckles] Dine? I'd sooner see myself in hell first.
  • Sharp-Dressed Man : Unlike many other adaptations of A Christmas Carol , Scrooge doesn't wear a nightshirt and nightcap during his journeys with the ghosts — he just puts on a dressing gown and slippers over the shirt, waistcoat and trousers he wore during the day, which is very close to book's description of his clothing during the ghostly encounters.
  • Starts with Their Funeral : A slight case, as the film begins with Marley's funeral procession, though we don't see anything more.
  • Stepford Snarker : This Scrooge uses humor, anger, and denial as defense mechanisms even as he's clearly shaken and softening by what he witnesses.
  • Suddenly Shouting : After being shown a homeless family, with the father making the grim resolution to go to the workhouse and his wife insisting that they remain together even without a place to live, Scrooge asks why he was shown this and what these people could possibly have to do with him. Christmas Present: ARE THEY NOT OF THE HUMAN RACE?
  • Timeshifted Actor : Mark Strickson , fresh off his run as Turlough on Doctor Who , plays Young Scrooge.
  • Scrooge remembering the storybook characters he loved in the Past sequence is usually left out for brevity's sake, with this version being one of the few that keeps it.
  • This version also has the ghostly carriage Scrooge sees on his way home and Belle's scene with her husband and children, usually Adapted Out .
  • The shrieking voices heard from the street as Marley makes his exit out the window, are a nod to a scene from the book, almost always Adapted Out , in which Scrooge looks out his window and sees a whole bunch of ghosts walking about and dragging chains.
  • Much like the 1951 version, the film uses the tune and dance of "Roger de Coverley" at Fezziwig's party which is specifically noted in the book, but often replaced in adaptions.
  • This is one of the few versions that features Scrooge extinguishing The Ghost of Christmas Past with a giant candle snuffer. Other versions that include it are the 1971, 1977, 1999 and 2009 ones.
  • Scrooge confronting his shrouded corpse is also included in this adaptation.
  • As Scrooge begs to be spared, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come's hand can be seen trembling, a minor detail from the book usually left out.
  • Unable to Support a Wife : In this adaptation, Scrooge starts out in his pursuit of business success because he didn't think he had enough money to support Belle.
  • The Unintelligible : The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come doesn't speak, but every time it "responds" to Scrooge, a metallic wail, possibly meant to evoke the screech of a graveyard's gate, is heard in the background. Scrooge: You're devilish hard to have a conversation with.
  • Younger Than He Looks : The Ghost of Christmas Past shows Scrooge a scene where Belle and her husband mention Jacob Marley being on his deathbed, seven years before the present. Belle's youngest child looks to be no more than about 3-4, which means that Belle is at most in her early to mid-40s at the time. Assuming that Scrooge and Belle are similar in age, this implies that seven years later, Scrooge is still in early middle age and thus considerably younger than he looks.
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Ghostbusters: Frozen Empire

Ghostbusters: Frozen Empire (2024)

When the discovery of an ancient artifact unleashes an evil force, Ghostbusters new and old must join forces to protect their home and save the world from a second ice age. When the discovery of an ancient artifact unleashes an evil force, Ghostbusters new and old must join forces to protect their home and save the world from a second ice age. When the discovery of an ancient artifact unleashes an evil force, Ghostbusters new and old must join forces to protect their home and save the world from a second ice age.

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IMAGES

  1. Jason Flemyng as the Ghost of Christmas Future

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  2. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come... [A Christmas Carol, 1984] : r

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  3. The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come

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  4. Guy Pearce and Andy Serkis Give Us A Christmas Carol Like We’ve Never

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  5. Scrooge vs. the Ghost of Christmas Future. www.daverheaume.com

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  6. The Ghost of Christmas Future

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COMMENTS

  1. Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is a fictional character in Charles Dickens 's 1843 novella A Christmas Carol. The Ghost is the last of the three spirits that appear to miser Ebenezer Scrooge to offer him a chance of redemption .

  2. A Christmas Carol (TV Movie 1984)

    Quotes Ebenezer Scrooge : [on Tiny Tim] Tell me, Spirit... Will he live? Ghost of Christmas Present : I see a vacant place at this table. I see a crutch without an owner, carefully preserved. If these shadows remain unaltered by the future, the child will die. Ebenezer Scrooge : No. Say he'll be spared.

  3. A Christmas Carol (TV Movie 1984)

    Directed by Clive Donner Writing Credits Cast (in credits order) complete, awaiting verification Produced by Music by Nick Bicât Cinematography by Tony Imi Editing by Peter Tanner Casting By Noel Davis Jeremy Zimmermann Production Design by Roger Murray-Leach Art Direction by Peter Childs Harry Cordwell Costume Design by Evangeline Harrison

  4. Ghosts of Christmas Future in Christmas Carol movies, ranked by

    Tight-fisted, mean old miser Ebenezer Scrooge falls asleep on Christmas Eve and is visited by three spirits: the Ghost of Christmas Past, a man in a sleeping cap; the Ghost of Christmas...

  5. A Christmas Carol (TV Movie 1984)

    1984 PG 1h 40m IMDb RATING 7.8 /10 18K YOUR RATING Rate POPULARITY 1,167 1,102 Play trailer 2:09 2 Videos 62 Photos Drama Family Fantasy A bitter old miser who rationalizes his uncaring nature learns real compassion when three spirits visit him on Christmas Eve. Director Clive Donner Writers Charles Dickens Roger O. Hirson Stars George C. Scott

  6. A Christmas Carol George C Scott 1984

    About Press Copyright Contact us Creators Advertise Developers Terms Privacy Policy & Safety How YouTube works Test new features NFL Sunday Ticket Press Copyright ...

  7. Ghost of Christmas Future Clip ft. Bill Murray

    Just when Frank Cross (Bill Murray) thinks his Christmas Eve can't get any crazier, he's visited by a fired executive with a vengeance and the grim reaper, w...

  8. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

    Portrayed by The Witch ( Janet Waldo) ( An Adaptation of Dickens' Christmas Carol, Performed by The Walt Disney Players) Pete ( Will Ryan) ( Mickey's Christmas Carol) Don Austen ( The Muppet Christmas Carol) Performance model Rob Tygner Jim Carrey Inspiration Personification of death The Ghost of Christmas Future from the original novel

  9. Spirit of Christmas Yet to Come

    Spirit of Christmas Yet to Come, sometimes referred to as the Ghost of Christmas Future, or the spirit of Christmas Future, is the fourth ghost to visit Ebenezer Scrooge (after Jacob Marley and The Spirits of Christmas Past and present He shows him the future if he does not change his ways. "The Phantom slowly, gravely, silently, approached. When it came near him, Scrooge bent down upon his ...

  10. Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol (1984) Feature

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come. "The Phantom slowly, gravely, silently approached. When. it came, Scrooge bent down upon his knee; for in. the very air through which this Spirit moved it seemed. to scatter gloom and mystery. It was shrouded in a deep black garment, which concealed. its head, its face, its form, and left nothing of it visible.

  11. Mickey's Christmas Carol (1983)- The Ghost of Christmas Future

    YouTube Movies & TV Fantasy • 1992 Buy or rent Scrooge meets the Ghost of Christmas Future (Pete) who shows him a possible dark future for the Cratchit's and himself.

  12. A Christmas Carol (1984 film)

    A Christmas Carol is a 1984 British-American made-for-television film adaptation of Charles Dickens ' A Christmas Carol (1843). The film was directed by Clive Donner, who had been an editor of the 1951 film Scrooge, and stars George C. Scott as Ebenezer Scrooge.

  13. 'A Christmas Carol' Adaptations: Best Movies and TV Episodes

    'Family Ties' (1984) ... (William Daniels) look-a-like gives him a glimpse of a future Christmas. The ghost first shows Cory what his life will be like if he decides to break up with Topanga.

  14. All The Ghosts Of Christmas Yet To Come, Ranked By Scariness

    Mickey's Christmas Carol (1983) Photo: Buena Vista Distribution. Disney's adaptation of the Christmas tale portrays the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come as a gargantuan, cigar-smoking figure draped in brown robes. As Scrooge is about to fall into his fiery grave, the spirit removes his hood, revealing himself as Pete.

  15. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Character Analysis in A Christmas

    It's no accident that the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is described similarly to the Grim Reaper; the final lesson imparted to Scrooge harkens back to Jacob Marley's warning about an eternity of punishment and centers on one's fear of death, and the ghost personifies death's inevitability.

  16. A Christmas Carol (TV Movie 1984)

    Ghost of Christmas Present : They are your children! They are the children of all who walk the earth unseen! Their names are Ignorance and Want! Beware of them, for upon their brow is written the word "doom"! They spell the downfall of you and all who deny their existence!

  17. The Many Ghosts of 'A Christmas Carol'

    1984 - Michael Carter. Michael Carter, most famous for playing Bib Fortuna in Return of the Jedi, takes on the cloaked spirit of Christmas Yet To Come. The shaky handed spook has little to say and is an ominous shape in the 1984 adaption of A Christmas Carol. ... The last of the ghosts to haunt Frank Cross, is the Ghost of Christmas Future ...

  18. What lesson does Scrooge learn from each spirit in A Christmas Carol

    The Ghost of Christmas Future shows Scrooge what will happen if he continues this path. Scrooge fears him, because he does not want to know what he might become. In his heart, he knows it won't ...

  19. Ghost of Christmas Present's darker side

    283K views 11 years ago These clips are from one of the best versions of "A Christmas Carol" ever produced, starring George C. Scott as Scrooge. I really like this film's portrayal of the Ghost...

  20. A Christmas Carol

    1984; 1 hr 40 mins Drama, Fantasy, Kids ... who is visited by the ghosts of past, present and future Christmases. Director 2 Credits. Clive Donner. Robert Zemeckis ... Ghost of Christmas Past ...

  21. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come

    The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, also known as the Ghost of Christmas Future, is a character from Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol.. Role in the story []. The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is the third and final ghost who haunts the miser Ebenezer Scrooge, in order to prompt him to adopt a more caring attitude in life and avoid a horrid afterlife like the Jacob Marley now suffers.

  22. A Christmas Carol (1984) (Film)

    A Christmas Carol is a 1984 made-for-TV film adaptation of the novel of the same name, directed by Clive Donner.It stars George C. Scott as Ebenezer Scrooge, the man who thinks Christmas is "humbug" until he's visited by three ghosts with an agenda. It was released in cinemas in the UK, where it was also filmed. David Warner, who spent most of his career playing villains and psychos, has a ...

  23. A Christmas Carol: The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come Quotes

    Charles Dickens Study Guide Full Text Mastery Quizzes Flashcards Quotes The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come When it came near him, Scrooge bent down upon his knee; for in the very air through which this Spirit moved it seemed to scatter gloom and mystery.

  24. Ghostbusters: Frozen Empire (2024)

    Ghostbusters: Frozen Empire: Directed by Gil Kenan. With Carrie Coon, Mckenna Grace, Annie Potts, Paul Rudd. When the discovery of an ancient artifact unleashes an evil force, Ghostbusters new and old must join forces to protect their home and save the world from a second ice age.