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One-Design Class Type: Dinghy

Was this boat built to be sailed by youth or adults? Both

Approximately how many class members do you have? 150

Photo Credit:

Y-Flyer sailing one design

Photo Credit: Oregatthalh- Y-Flyer

y class sailboat

About Y-Flyer

A 4 corner, almost flat bottom 500 lb 18 ft scow designed in 1940 by Alvin Youngquist. M & J =160 sq ft. Sailed/Raced by 2. American Y-Flyer Class organized in 1950 and continued since. Canadian Y-Flyer organized in 1945 and continued since. Both Am and Canadian associations joined together as Y-Flyer International Union with by yearly competition. Canadian Assn sails with spinnaker. US Assn sails without spinnaker.

Boats Produced: 2800

Class boat builder(s):

Presently, no commercial builder. Wooden Y-Flyer can be made at home from Class plans.

Approximately how many boats are in the USA/North America? 500

Where is your One-Design class typically sailed in the USA? List regions of the country:

Canada – ON, QE, AB, BC US – AL, AR, GA, IL, IN, KY, OH, TN, MA, NC, SC, NY

Does this class have a spinnaker or gennaker? Yes

How many people sail as a crew including the helm?  2

Ideal combined weight of range of crew:  300

Boat Designed in  1940

Length (feet/inches): 18′

Beam: 70″

Weight of rigged boat without sails: 500

Draft: 6″

Mast Height: 22′

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  • Sailboat Guide

Y Flyer insignia

Y Flyer is a 18 ′ 2 ″ / 5.5 m monohull sailboat designed by Alvin Youngquist and built by Helms - Jack A. Helms Co., Turner Marine, and Jibetech starting in 1941.

Drawing of Y Flyer

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

The design first appeared in ‘The Rudder’ magazine in 1938 and originally intended for the home builder. The Y FLYER has been popular in America and Canada.

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Y Flyers of the South

  • By Dan Dickison
  • February 25, 2022

ay Greenfield and Kyle Fast

If a formula exists for supercharging activity in a one‑design fleet, Ned Goss appears to have discovered it. Though he’s only been active in the Y-Flyer Class for a few years, his efforts to bolster turnout at a local regatta in Charleston, South Carolina, 18 months ago sparked a movement. Since then, local participation has trebled, and a new class builder has come forward with six boats on order and more to come.

So, how does a former pro sailor and speed ­merchant—Goss documented 36.5 knots aboard his Mach 2 Moth one afternoon in 2014 on Charleston Harbor, making him the fastest Moth sailor in the world—suddenly become the spark plug for an 80-year-old one-design class? As unlikely as that progression seems, it’s a morality tale for the sport—all about fun and family.

Designed in 1938 by Alvin Youngquist, of Toledo, Ohio, the uniquely identifiable Y-Flyer is an 18-foot hard-chined, scow-shaped, two-­person dinghy with fleets active throughout the southeastern, Midwestern, and northeastern US. There are pockets in Canada as well. Originally designed to be built at home out of plywood, the majority of Y-Flyers active today are molded in fiberglass. Fully rigged, these boats customarily weigh around 500 pounds (the class-required ­minimum weight) and carry a single-spreader mast supporting 161 square feet of sail area in a main and a jib. The Y-Flyer Class Association advertises its craft as “fun, versatile and family-­oriented.” It turns out, those are exactly the qualities that galvanized Goss’ interest.

Some people are described as a bundle of energy. Goss, a Connecticut-native-cum-South-Carolinian, is the exponential extension of that. He’s hyperkinetic, perpetually on the move. In Charleston, at the James Island YC Y-Flyer and Friends Regatta this fall—an event he co-founded—Goss drove the tractor to launch and haul boats while ­discussing equipment refinements with fellow competitors and alternately using his phone to manage the coming week’s schedule of sailing classes, exams and maintenance work at the College of Charleston’s sailing center, where he serves as dockmaster, head instructor and offshore sailing coach.

At 44, Goss has been sailing and sailboat ­racing most of his life. He’s bounced from Blue Jays to 420s, Fireballs, 49ers, Melges 24s, foiling Moths, and an assortment of keelboats. Throughout his time in this sport, he’s experienced periods that could best be described as burnout. And each time after a hiatus away from racing, he’s returned to competitive sailing with renewed energy.

“I’ve had a couple of episodes in my life,” he explains, “where the sailing I was doing became overly intense. In those moments, I just had to step away from the sport. And each time, after some reflection, I realized that the fun had gone out of it. I know now that what I really love is sailing with people. Sailing alone like you do in the Moth class just doesn’t satisfy me in a sustainable way. I love being around others who love sailing and openly sharing what they learn. In our Y-Flyer fleet, after every regatta we sit down and talk, and the newer competitors learn from the more seasoned Y sailors. That’s basically the ethos of this class. It really adds to the fun of racing, and it allows everyone to get better.”

This is exactly what Charleston’s Y-Flyer cohort experienced recently, and it all seems to trace back to one phone call.

Charleston, South Carolina’s Ashley River

In the weeks leading up to the 2020 edition of the James Island Open Regatta—a summertime staple—Goss determined that he and his wife, Jessica, would race their Y-Flyer. He’d had the boat for several years but only raced it occasionally.

“At the time,” Goss recalls, “I was looking for a two-person boat that wasn’t too technical so I could compete in it with my wife, who is a relative newcomer to the sport. We had the Y-Flyer, so that’s what we ­registered for the regatta.”

The problem was, only one other entry materialized in that class. That was about when Goss got a call from Jeff Woodard. He was a Hobie 20 racer, but local participation in that class had recently faltered. So, Woodard wondered if Goss could locate a Y-Flyer that he and his wife, Amy, could race in the regatta. As Goss tells the story, he got busy on the phone, and in little time he’d found four available boats.

“Bob Turner, who is the Y-Flyer class president, had an extra boat that he agreed to loan out,” Goss explains, “and I found three others. It wasn’t a problem finding people to race them because COVID had shut down so many sailing events that everyone was eager to get back on the water. Right out of the gate, we had eight boats registered for the regatta, and I think seven crews ended up competing. Half that fleet had never sailed a Y-Flyer before.”

That was the turning point. The momentum continued when the fleet began participating in the James Island Yacht Club’s weekly summer evening series. With four boats available each week as loaners, a number of different individuals got the chance to sample Y-Flyer racing over that summer. Sensing a chance to really spread the word, the Gosses did their best to connect these opportunities with local influencers, like Greg Fisher and Kevin Jewett, the former and current ­directors of the College of Charleston’s sailing program.

Ravenel Bridge

After one Thursday evening sailing with his wife, Jo Ann, Fisher seemed genuinely enthused. “It’s really exciting to see the rebirth of the Y class here in Charleston,” he says. “I think it’s the perfect boat to involve all levels and ages of sailors, and it seems like the class here has a great group of people working hard to help and encourage new participants. Jo Ann and I had a super time enjoying the fun, quick racing out there tonight. We’re actually talking about buying our own boat and getting involved full time.”

The fun that Fisher cites turned out to be infectious, and in short order, other local influencers got involved as well. Three-time Sunfish world champion David Loring actually grew up sailing Y-Flyers in Charleston, so he found a boat and joined in. And so did Will Hanckel, who took his first ride on a Y-Flyer at age 3 and can’t remember a time that there wasn’t one sitting in the family driveway. (Loring and Hanckel are both former junior and adult national champions in this class.)

And local one-design legend Lenny Krawcheck ­gravitated back to the class as well. As a teenager, he was the Y-Flyer junior national champion in 1959, and later won the national championship twice (’82 and ’94). For him, this resurgence in activity was almost nostalgic. Krawcheck recalls an era when there were 30-plus Y-Flyers racing regularly in Charleston.

Throughout the subsequent fall and winter—­customarily Charleston’s offseason—Goss and company kept the momentum humming by orchestrating a series of one-day regattas. In the aggregate, all of this activity didn’t go unnoticed. Jessica Goss was documenting it for the Y-Flyer class website with regular updates, and others, like the aforementioned Turner—the class president—were promoting it elsewhere. So, it wasn’t surprising that Charleston’s contingent was able to ­convince the national class officers to have the Y-Flyer molds shipped from New England down to Charleston, where Kurt Oberle, of High and Dry Boatworks, had agreed to become the new builder.

Local Y‑Flyer class spark plug Ned Goss

Oberle—more custom fabricator than boatbuilder—didn’t want to build the boats conventionally. What really cemented his interest in becoming the official class builder was the opportunity to implement a resin-infusion process.

“We’ve been working with infusion guru Phil Steggall from MJM Yachts,” Oberle explains. “Peter Johnstone was kind enough to loan him for this project. The toughest part has been setting up 30-year-old molds to work with resin infusion. At the moment, we’re sourcing all the materials to get started on the first boat. We’ve got six boats on order, and there’s potentially enough demand that we’ll build another six by the end of next year.”

Part of that demand is being driven by locals like David Hood, who borrowed a boat and raced most of the past summer with his two daughters—Saylor, 8, and Harbor, 6. Putting his boat away at the James Island YC after a breezy last day of the Y-Flyer and Friends Regatta, Hood seemed quite pleased.

“This is our first year in the Y,” he says, “and I’ve learned that it’s a pretty easy platform for a family like ours. I’ve raced Lightnings for years, but I think that boat would be too much for the girls right now. The Y is fun, and they seem to love it. It’s just so easy to get here, set up the rig, get the boat in the water, and 15 minutes later, we’re racing.”

What Hood identifies is a key aspect of the Y-Flyer’s longevity—its simplicity. That element means these boats are accessible to a wide array of sailors. The Y-Flyer can accommodate not just a broad spectrum of combined crew weights, but also a wide range of racing talent. Of the 13 boats on the water at this event, five were raced by family crews, and six had both males and females on board. But perhaps the most telling metric of all is the fact that the competitors’ ages ranged from 6 to 80.

Come June, the Y-Flyer National Championship regatta will take place on Lake Norman, North Carolina, a mere three hours up the road from Charleston. Goss intends to rally at least half a dozen Lowcountry boats to make the trip. Ideally, he says, all of them will place in the top 10. Regardless, he knows the ultimate measure won’t be trophies won; it will be in fun had. And that’s just how it ought to be in this sport.

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The Princess Yachts Y Class: Yachts of Distinction

Thursday 9th March 2023

As a line of sub-100-foot mini superyachts, each of the four Princess Y Class yachts is designed to deliver cruising at its most cultured. With exquisite materials, meticulous detailing and large, open spaces bathed in natural light, guest comfort is unashamedly high-end.  And with first-class seakeeping, high-volume internal capacity and a variety of living and dining spaces, practical long-distance cruising is also a major strength.

Princess Yachts has long been famous for the creation of midsized flybridge cruisers that combine great internal space with proven hulls and premium luxury.  But with a modern fleet spanning 21 boat models across six product lines from 40 to 95 feet, its modern fleet is in fact tremendously diverse.  The R35 open sports boat is the smallest and fastest model in the fleet.  Above that, the V Class transfers plenty of pace and agility into the luxury cruising sector.  The iconic F Class flybridge motor yachts add extra space from 40 to 62 feet, before the S Class takes up the mantle, with a range of ‘sportbridge’ motor yachts from 62 to 78 feet.  And while the new expedition-style X Class has brought fresh opportunities at 80 and 95 feet, the imperious Y Class remains a crystal-clear expression of Princess’s inherited strengths.

Princess Y72: for ‘big boat’ luxury

Introduced in the summer of 2020, this smallest of the Y Class yachts is an object lesson in on board decadence. It uses an Olesinski exterior design that is defined not by flat two-dimensional surfaces but by elegantly sculpted three-dimensional forms. Though arguably less ostentatious in appearance than other sub-100-foot ‘superyachts’, it also features full-length windows that echo those on the new Y95 flagship, plus a flybridge that provides the option of an extended hardtop with a stylish louvered roof.  The foredeck sunbathing area can be converted to include forward or aft-facing seats and, while the sociable helm is ideal for owner-operator use, there is also a twin ensuite crew cabin that doubles as an extra guest room. This adds some useful cruising flexibility to the four dedicated ensuite cabins further forward – and yet the full-beam master stateroom still has plenty of room for its own private spiral staircase. Little wonder that this beautiful yacht scooped a winner’s gong at the prestigious Motor Boat of the Year Awards in 2022.

y class sailboat

Princess Y80: for convivial cruising

Offering a generous beam, the new Y80 provides significant volume and flexibility with owners able to specify innovative alternative layouts to suit their needs. A choice of three cockpit designs are available: a traditional U-shaped dining arrangement with additional storage solution for two SEABOBs; a central cockpit table with free standing furniture to seat eight guests; or Princess’ new ‘infinity cockpit’ layout (first seen on the new Princess Y85) with electrically sliding seating and table mechanism to transform the area from a relaxed sofa arrangement to an informal dining area.

There is a seamless connection of each zone on the main deck, from living area to dining arrangement, from well-equipped galley to day head, through to the wheelhouse with helm station and companion seating.  Below deck, four ensuite cabins sleep eight, supported by crew quarters with two further cabins and a crew mess.  The elegant master stateroom, accessed via private stairway from the main deck, makes full use of the yacht’s impressive beam.

The flybridge features relaxed seating and dining areas, a large sunpad, fully equipped wetbar with optional stools, plus stowage capacity for a 4m tender or wetbike.  Flexibility continues on the flybridge too with two further aft layout options including a relaxed free-standing L-shaped seating arrangement or spa bath with sun loungers aft.  The foredeck has been designed to offer a secluded escape to while-away an afternoon or an elegant entertaining space to sip cocktails with guests. A conversationalist seating area can easily accommodate 10 people, which can convert to offer a spacious sunpad.

Equipped with twin MAN V12 1900hp engines, the Y80 offers powerful performance with maximum speeds in excess of 30 knots.

y class sailboat

Princess Y85: for on board entertaining

Designed in collaboration with Italian styling house, Pininfarina, the Princess Y85 adds some useful extra features for crewed adventures. In the open-plan single-level main deck saloon, for instance, there’s a large aft lounge, a forward dining table and a port galley with an attractive bar. There’s also a handy day heads in the forward part of the saloon – but the main deck helm station is divided off from the main living space for outstanding privacy on long-distance cruises. And at the touch of a button, the galley can also be fully enclosed to help divide the utility spaces from the party zones.

All this main deck versatility means there’s only one (rather than two) staircases to access the lower deck, but down below, there is ample space not just for four ensuite cabins but also for a class-leading separate crew quarters comprising two crew cabins and a crew mess. That space is echoed up on the flybridge, where the helm, dining area, wet bar and sunbed are supplemented with a large aft deck with crane and tender storage, helping free up the lower swim platform for watersports.  And in spite of the scale and calibre of her recreational spaces, the Y85 is an impressive performer too.  With twin MAN V12-1900 diesels, she can reach speeds of up to 31 knots and deliver a supremely quiet and refined cruise.

y class sailboat

Princess Y95: for ultimate indulgence

If you want the space and flexibility of the X95 but with an extra dose of classical elegance, the flagship of the Y Class range is a great solution.  Rivalling even Princess’s own previous iconic M Class for space, facilities and quality of finish, it features the longest and most expansive hull windows ever installed on a Princess yacht. That certainly helps guarantee huge views from both the main and lower decks but the really key difference on this boat is the provision of a full-beam master suite in the forward part of the main deck.

As on the X Class models, it’s achieved by means of cleverly designed side decks that lift just forward of amidships, opening out the superstructure to wonderful effect.  The master suite is afforded plenty of space for its own lounge and dressing area, plus delightful views through floor-to-ceiling windows on both sides. And the aft part of the main deck also enjoys some distinctly high-end day spaces, thanks to a large bathing platform with an optional Beach Club.  Elsewhere, there are four additional ensuite guest cabins, accessed via a large spiral staircase, plus ample crew accommodation and an ensuite Captain’s cabin with double bed.  Beautifully designed, with a flawless finish, configurable layouts and plenty of bright, wide-open space, the flagship Y95 is the perfect ambassador of what makes the Princess Yachts Y Class so special.

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View our sophisticated range of Princess Yachts Y Class motor yachts online.

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17 Sailboat Types Explained: How To Recognize Them

Ever wondered what type of sailboat you're looking at? Identifying sailboats isn't hard, you just have to know what to look for. In this article, I'll help you.

Every time I'm around a large number of sailboats, I look around in awe (especially with the bigger ones). I recognize some, but with most of them, I'll have to ask the owner. When they answer, I try to hide my ignorance. The words don't make any sense!

So here's a complete list with pictures of the most common sailboat types today. For each of them, I'll explain exactly where the name comes from, and how you can recognize it easily.

Gaff rigged white schooner

So here's my list of popular sailboat types, explained:

Bermuda sloop, sailing hydrofoil, dutch barge, chinese junk, square-rigged tall ship, in conclusion, how to recognize any sailboat.

Before we get started, I wanted to quickly explain what you should look for when you try to identify a sailboat.

The type of sailboat is always determined by one of these four things:

  • The type of hull
  • The type of keel
  • The number of masts
  • And the type of sails and rig

The hull is the boat's body. There are basically three hull types: monohull, catamaran, and trimaran. Simply said: do I see one hull, two hulls (catamaran) or three hulls (trimaran)? Most sailboats are monohulls.

Next, there is the keel type. The keel is the underwater part of the hull. Mostly, you won't be able to see that, because it's underwater. So we'll leave that for now.

The sail plan

The last factor is the number of masts and the sail plan. The sail plan, simply put, is the number of sails, the type of sails, and how the sails are mounted to the masts (also called rigging ).

Sailboat are mostly named after the sail plan, but occasionally, a sail type is thrown in there as well.

So now we know what to pay attention to, let's go and check out some sailboats!

Row of sailing dinghies in golden hour at the dock

Dinghies are the smallest and most simple sailboats around.

They are your typical training sailboats. Small boats with an open hull, with just one mast and one sail. Perfect for learning the ways of the wind.

On average, they are between 6 and 20 ft long. Mostly sailed single-handed (solo). There's no special rigging, just the mainsail. The mainsail is commonly a Bermuda (triangular) mainsail. Dinghies have a simple rudder stick and no special equipment or rigging.

Dinghies are great for learning how to sail. The smaller the boat, the better you feel the impact of your trim and actions.

How to recognize a sailing dinghy:

  • short (8ft)
  • one Bermuda sail
  • open hull design
  • rudder stick

Common places to spot them: lakes, near docks

Three Bermuda Sloops in bright blue water

If you'd ask a kid to draw a sailboat, she'll most probably draw this one. The Bermuda Sloop is the most popular and most common sailboat type today. You'll definitely recognize this one.

How to recognize a Bermuda Sloop:

  • triangular mainsail (called a Bermuda sail)
  • a foresail (also called the jib)
  • fore-and-aft rigged
  • medium-sized (12 - 50 ft)

Fore-and-aft rigged just means "from front to back". This type of rigging helps to sail upwind.

Any sailboat with one mast and two sails could still be a sloop. Even if the sails are another shape or rigged in another way. For example, here's a gaff-rigged sloop (more on the gaff rig later):

Gaff Rigged Sloop in white in front of coastline with flat

If you want to learn all about sail rigs, check out my full Guide to Understanding Sail Rig Types here. It has good infographics and explains it in more detail

The Bermuda sloop has a lot of advantages over other sailboat types (which is why it's so popular):

  • the Bermuda rig is very maneuverable and pretty fast in almost all conditions
  • it's really versatile
  • you can sail it by yourself without any problems
  • it's a simple setup

Common places to spot a sloop: everywhere. Smaller sloops are more common for inland waters, rivers, and lakes. Medium-sized and large sloops are very popular cruising boats.

Cutter motorsailor against sun in black and white

Cutters have one mast but three or more sails. Most cutters are Bermuda rigged, which means they look a lot like sloops.

How to recognize a cutter:

  • looks like a sloop
  • two or more headsails instead of one
  • commonly one mast
  • sometimes an extra mast with mainsail

Cutters have more sail area, which makes them faster, but also harder to sail single-handed. There's also more strain on the mast and rigging.

Common places to spot a cutter: everywhere. Cutters are very popular for cruising.

They mostly have a Bermuda rig, which means triangular sails. But there are also gaff cutters and naval cutters, and some have two masts.

Here's an example of a two-masted naval cutter with an extra gaff mainsail and top gaff:

Dutch naval cutter with top gaff sail

The Hydrofoil is a pretty new sailboat design. It's a racing sailboat with thin wing foils under the hull. These lift up the hull, out of the water, reducing the displacement to nearly zero. The foils create downforce and keep it from lifting off entirely.

This makes the hydrofoil extremely fast and also impressive.

The hydrofoil refers to the keel type. There are both monohull and multihull hydrofoils.

How to recognize a hydrofoil:

  • it flies above the waterline and has small fins

Common places to spot a hydrofoil: at racing events

Cruising catamaran at dock in blue waters

Famous catamaran: La Vagabonde from Sailing La Vagabonde

A catamaran is a type of cruising and racing multihull sailboat with two hulls. The hulls are always the same size.

Most catamarans have a standard Bermuda rig. The catamaran refers to the hull, so it can have any number of masts, sails, sail types and rig type.

How to recognize a catamaran:

  • any boat with two hulls is called a catamaran

Common places to spot catamarans: coastal waters, The Caribbean, shallow reefs

The advantages of a catamaran: Catamarans heel less than monohulls and are more buoyant. Because of the double hull, they don't need as deep a keel to be stable. They have a smaller displacement, making them faster. They also have a very shallow draft. That's why catamarans are so popular in the Caribbean, where there's lots of shallow water.

Catamarans are nearly impossible to capsize:

"Compared with a monohull, a cruising catamaran sailboat has a high initial resistance to heeling and capsize—a fifty-footer requires four times the force to initiate a capsize than an equivalent monohull." Source: Wikipedia

Trimaran in green-blue waves

How to recognize a trimaran:

  • any boat with three hulls is called a trimaran

Trimarans have three hulls, so it's a multi-hull design. It's mostly a regular monohull with two smaller hulls or floaters on the sides. Some trimarans can be trailered by winching in the auxiliary hulls, like this:

Extended trimaran hull

This makes them very suitable for long-term cruising, but also for regular docking. This is great for crowded areas and small berths, like in the Mediterranean. It sure is more cost-effective than the catamaran (but you also don't have the extra storage and living space!).

Common places to spot Trimarans: mostly popular for long-term cruising, you'll find the trimaran in coastal areas.

Gaff rigged white schooner

Gaffer refers to gaff-rigged, which is the way the sails are rigged. A gaff rig is a rectangular sail with a top pole, or 'spar', which attaches it to the mast. This pole is called the 'gaff'. To hoist the mainsail, you hoist this top spar with a separate halyard. Most gaffers carry additional gaff topsails as well.

Gaff rigs are a bit less versatile than sloops. Because of the gaff, they can have a larger sail area. So they will perform better with downwind points of sail. Upwind, however, they handle less well.

How to recognize a gaffer:

  • sail is rectangular
  • mainsail has a top pole (or spar)

Since a gaffer refers to the rig type, and not the mast configuration or keel type, all sailboats with this kind of rigging can be called 'gaffers'.

Common places to spot a gaffer: Gaffers are popular inland sailboats. It's a more traditional rig, being used recreationally.

White schooner with two headsails

Schooners used to be extremely popular before sloops took over. Schooners are easy to sail but slower than sloops. They handle better than sloops in all comfortable (cruising) points of sail, except for upwind.

How to recognize a schooner:

  • mostly two masts
  • smaller mast in front
  • taller mast in the back
  • fore-and-aft rigged sails
  • gaff-rigged mainsails (spar on top of the sail)

Common places to spot a schooner: coastal marinas, bays

Ketch with maroon sails

How to recognize a ketch:

  • medium-sized (30 ft and up)
  • smaller mast in back
  • taller mast in front
  • both masts have a mainsail

The ketch refers to the sail plan (mast configuration and type of rig). Ketches actually handle really well. The back mast (mizzenmast) powers the hull, giving the skipper more control. Because of the extra mainsail, the ketch has shorter masts. This means less stress on masts and rigging, and less heel.

Common places to spot a ketch: larger marinas, coastal regions

White yawl with two masts and blue spinnaker

How to recognize a yawl:

  • main mast in front
  • much smaller mast in the back
  • back mast doesn't carry a mainsail

The aft mast is called a mizzenmast. Most ketches are gaff-rigged, so they have a spar at the top of the sail. They sometimes carry gaff topsails. They are harder to sail than sloops.

The yawl refers to the sail plan (mast configuration and type of rig).

Common places to spot a yawl: they are not as popular as sloops, and most yawls are vintage sailboat models. You'll find most being used as daysailers on lakes and in bays.

Clipper with leeboards

Dutch Barges are very traditional cargo ships for inland waters. My hometown is literally littered with a very well-known type of barge, the Skutsje. This is a Frisian design with leeboards.

Skutsjes don't have a keel but use leeboards for stability instead, which are the 'swords' or boards on the side of the hull.

How to recognize a Dutch Barge:

  • most barges have one or two masts
  • large, wooden masts
  • leeboards (wooden wings on the side of the hull)
  • mostly gaff-rigged sails (pole on top of the sail, attached to mast)
  • a ducktail transom

y class sailboat

The clipper is one of the latest sailboat designs before steam-powered vessels took over. The cutter has a large cargo area for transporting cargo. But they also needed to be fast to compete with steam vessels. It's a large, yet surprisingly fast sailboat model, and is known for its good handling.

This made them good for trade, especially transporting valuable goods like tea or spices.

How to recognize a Clipper:

  • mostly three masts
  • square-rigged sails
  • narrow but long, steel hull

Common places to spot a clipper: inland waters, used as houseboats, but coastal waters as well. There are a lot of clippers on the Frisian Lakes and Waddenzee in The Netherlands (where I live).

Chinese Junk sailboat with red sails

This particular junk is Satu, from the Chesapeake Bay Area.

The Chinese Junk is an ancient type of sailboat. Junks were used to sail to Indonesia and India from the start of the Middle Ages onward (500 AD). The word junk supposedly comes from the Chinese word 'jung', meaning 'floating house'.

How to recognize a Chinese junk:

  • medium-sized (30 - 50 ft)
  • large, flat sails with full-length battens
  • stern (back of the hull) opens up in a high deck
  • mostly two masts (sometimes one)
  • with two mainsails, sails are traditionally maroon
  • lug-rigged sails

The junk has a large sail area. The full-length battens make sure the sails stay flat. It's one of the flattest sails around, which makes it good for downwind courses. This also comes at a cost: the junk doesn't sail as well upwind.

White cat boat with single gaff-rigged sail

The cat rig is a sail plan with most commonly just one mast and one sail, the mainsail.

Most sailing dinghies are cats, but there are also larger boats with this type of sail plan. The picture above is a great example.

How to recognize a cat rig:

  • smaller boats
  • mostly one mast
  • one sail per mast
  • no standing rigging

Cat-rigged refers to the rigging, not the mast configuration or sail type. So you can have cats with a Bermuda sail (called a Bermuda Cat) or gaff-rigged sail (called a Gaff Cat), and so on. There are also Cat Ketches and Cat Schooners, for example. These have two masts.

The important thing to know is: cats have one sail per mast and no standing rigging .

Most typical place to spot Cats: lakes and inland waters

Brig under sail with woodlands

Famous brig: HMS Beagle (Charles Darwin's ship)

A brig was a very popular type of small warship of the U.S. navy during the 19th century. They were used in the American Revolution and other wars with the United Kingdom. They carry 10-18 guns and are relatively fast and maneuverable. They required less crew than a square-rigged ship.

How to recognize a brig:

  • square-rigged foremast
  • mainmast square-rigged or square-rigged and gaff-rigged

y class sailboat

How to recognize a tall ship:

  • three or four masts
  • square sails with a pole across the top
  • multiple square sails on each mast
  • a lot of lines and rigging

Square-rigged ships, or tall ships, are what we think of when we think of pirate ships. Now, most pirate ships weren't actually tall ships, but they come from around the same period. They used to be built from wood, but more modern tall ships are nearly always steel.

Tall ships have three or four masts and square sails which are square-rigged. That means they are attached to the masts with yards.

We have the tall ship races every four years, where dozens of tall ships meet and race just offshore.

Most common place to spot Tall Ships: Museums, special events, open ocean

Trabaccolo with large yellow sails

This is a bonus type since it is not very common anymore. As far as I know, there's only one left.

The Trabaccolo is a small cargo ship used in the Adriatic Sea. It has lug sails. A lug rig is a rectangular sail, but on a long pole or yard that runs fore-and-aft. It was a popular Venetian sailboat used for trade.

The name comes from the Italian word trabacca , which means tent, referring to the sails.

How to recognize a Trabaccolo:

  • wide and short hull
  • sails look like a tent

Most common place to spot Trabaccolo's: the Marine Museum of Cesenatico has a fully restored Trabaccolo.

So, there you have it. Now you know what to look for, and how to recognize the most common sailboat types easily. Next time you encounter a magnificent sailboat, you'll know what it's called - or where to find out quickly.

Pinterest image for 17 Sailboat Types Explained: How To Recognize Them

I loved this article. I had no idea there were so many kinds of sailboats.

i have a large sailing boat about 28ft. that im having a difficult time identifying. it was my fathers & unfortunately hes passed away now. any helpful information would be appreciated.

Jorge Eusali Castro Archbold

I find a saleboat boat but i can find the módem…os registré out off bru’x, and the saleboat name is TADCOZ, can you tell me who to go about this matter in getting info.thank con voz your time…

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You may also like, guide to understanding sail rig types (with pictures).

There are a lot of different sail rig types and it can be difficult to remember what's what. So I've come up with a system. Let me explain it in this article.

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Types of Sailboats: A Complete Guide

Types of Sailboats | Life of Sailing

Last Updated by

Daniel Wade

June 15, 2022

Learning the different types of sailboats can help you identify vessels and choose the right boat.

In this article, we'll cover the most common kinds of sailboats, their origins, and what they're used for. We'll also go over the strengths and weaknesses of each design, along with when they're most useful.

The most common kind of sailboat is the sloop, as it's simple to operate and versatile. Other common sailboat types include the schooner, cutter, cat, ketch, schooner, catamaran, and trimaran. Other sailboat variations include pocket cruisers, motorsailers, displacement, and shoal-draft vessels.

The information found in this article is sourced from boat reference guides, including A Field Guide to Sailboats of North America by Richard M. Sherwood and trusted sources in the sailing community.

Table of contents

Distinguishing Types of Sailboats

In this article, we'll distinguish sailboats by traits such as their hull type, rig, and general configuration. Some sailboats share multiple characteristics with other boats but fall into a completely different category. For example, a sailboat with a Bermuda rig, a large engine, and a pilothouse could technically be called a sloop, but it's more likely a motorsailer.

When discerning sailboat type, the first most obvious place to look is the hull. If it has only one hull, you can immediately eliminate the trimaran and the catamaran. If it has two or more hulls, it's certainly not a typical monohull vessel.

The next trait to consider is the rig. You can tell a lot about a sailboat based on its rig, including what it's designed to be used for. For example, a long and slender sailboat with a tall triangular rig is likely designed for speed or racing, whereas a wide vessel with a complex gaff rig is probably built for offshore cruising.

Other factors that determine boat type include hull shape, overall length, cabin size, sail plan, and displacement. Hull material also plays a role, but every major type of sailboat has been built in both wood and fiberglass at some point.

Sailboat vs. Motorsailer

Most sailboats have motors, but most motorized sailboats are not motorsailers. A motorsailer is a specific kind of sailboat designed to run efficiently under sail and power, and sometimes both.

Most sailboats have an auxiliary engine, though these power plants are designed primarily for maneuvering. These vessels cannot achieve reasonable speed or fuel-efficiency. Motorsailers can operate like a powerboat.

Motorsailers provide great flexibility on short runs. They're great family boats, and they're popular in coastal communities with heavy boat traffic. However, these features come at a cost. Motorsailers aren't the fastest or most efficient powerboats, and they're also not the most agile sailboats. That said, they make an excellent general-purpose sailing craft.

Monohull vs. Multi-hull: Which is Better?

Multihull sailboats are increasingly popular, thanks to advances and lightweight materials, and sailboat design. But are they better than traditional sailboats? Monohulls are easier to maintain and less expensive, and they offer better interior layouts. Multihulls are more stable and comfortable, and they're significantly easier to control. Multihull sailboats also have a speed advantage.

Monohull Sailboats

A monohull sailboat is a traditionally-shaped vessel with a single hull. The vast majority of consumer sailboats are monohulls, as they're inexpensive to produce and easy to handle. Monohull sailboats are proven and easy to maintain, though they lack the initial stability and motion comfort of multi-hull vessels.

Monohull sailboats have a much greater rig variety than multi-hull sailboats. The vast majority of multihull sailboats have a single mast, whereas multi-masted vessels such as yawls and schooners are always monohulls. Some multi-hull sailboats have side-by-side masts, but these are the exception.

Catamaran Sailboats

The second most common sailboat configuration is the catamaran. A catamaran is a multihull sailboat that has two symmetrical hulls placed side-by-side and connected with a deck. This basic design has been used for hundreds of years, and it experienced a big resurgence in the fiberglass boat era.

Catamarans are fast, efficient, and comfortable. They don't heel very much, as this design has excellent initial stability. The primary drawback of the catamaran is below decks. The cabin of a catamaran is split between both hulls, which often leaves less space for the galley, head, and living areas.

Trimaran Sailboats

Trimarans are multi-hull sailboats similar to catamarans. Trimarans have three hulls arranged side-by-side. The profile of a trimaran is often indistinguishable from a catamaran.

Trimarans are increasingly popular, as they're faster than catamarans and monohulls and considerably easier to control. Trimarans suffer from the same spatial limitations as catamarans. The addition of an extra hull adds additional space, which is one reason why these multi-hull vessels are some of the best-selling sailboats on the market today.

Sailboat Rig Types

Rigging is another way to distinguish sailboat types. The rig of a sailboat refers to it's mast and sail configuration. Here are the most common types of sailboat rigs and what they're used for.

Sloops are the most common type of sailboat on the water today. A sloop is a simple single-mast rig that usually incorporates a tall triangular mainsail and headsail. The sloop rig is easy to control, fun to sail, and versatile. Sloops are common on racing sailboats as they can sail quite close to the wind. These maneuverable sailboats also have excellent windward performance.

The sloop rig is popular because it works well in almost any situation. That said, other more complex rigs offer finer control and superior performance for some hull types. Additionally, sloops spread their entire sail area over just to canvases, which is less flexible than multi-masted rigs. The sloop is ideal for general-purpose sailing, and it's proven itself inland and offshore.

Sloop Features:

  • Most popular sailboat rig
  • Single mast
  • One mainsail and headsail
  • Typically Bermuda-rigged
  • Easy to handle
  • Great windward performance
  • Less precise control
  • Easier to capsize
  • Requires a tall mast

Suitable Uses:

  • Offshore cruising
  • Coastal cruising

Cat (Catboat)

The cat (or catboat) is a single-masted sailboat with a large, single mainsail. Catboats have a thick forward mast, no headsail, and an exceptionally long boom. These vessels are typically gaff-rigged, as this four-edged rig offers greater sail area with a shorter mast. Catboats were popular workboats in New England around the turn of the century, and they have a large following today.

Catboats are typically short and wide, which provides excellent stability in rough coastal conditions. They're hardy and seaworthy vessels, but they're slow and not ideal for offshore use. Catboats are simple and easy to control, as they only have a single gaff sail. Catboats are easy to spot thanks to their forward-mounted mast and enormous mainsail.

Catboat Features:

  • Far forward-mounted single mast
  • Large four-sided gaff sail
  • Short and wide with a large cockpit
  • Usually between 20 and 30 feet in length
  • Excellent workboats
  • Tough and useful design
  • Great for fishing
  • Large cockpit and cabin
  • Not ideal for offshore sailing
  • Single sail offers less precise control
  • Slow compared to other rigs
  • Inland cruising

At first glance, a cutter is difficult to distinguish from a sloop. Both vessels have a single mast located in roughly the same position, but the sail plan is dramatically different. The cutter uses two headsails and often incorporates a large spar that extends from the bow (called a bowsprit).

The additional headsail is called a staysail. A sloop only carries one headsail, which is typically a jib. Cutter headsails have a lower center of gravity which provides superior performance in rough weather. It's more difficult to capsize a cutter, and they offer more precise control than a sloop. Cutters have more complex rigging, which is a disadvantage for some people.

Cutter Features:

  • Two headsails
  • Long bowsprit
  • Similar to sloop
  • Gaff or Bermuda-rigged
  • Fast and efficient
  • Offers precise control
  • Superior rough-weather performance
  • More complex than the sloop rig
  • Harder to handle than simpler rigs

Perhaps the most majestic type of sailboat rig, the schooner is a multi-masted vessel with plenty of history and rugged seaworthiness. The schooner is typically gaff-rigged with short masts and multiple sails. Schooners are fast and powerful vessels with a complex rig. These sailboats have excellent offshore handling characteristics.

Schooners have a minimum of two masts, but some have three or more. The aftermost large sail is the mainsail, and the nearly identical forward sail is called the foresail. Schooners can have one or more headsail, which includes a cutter-style staysail. Some schooners have an additional smaller sale aft of the mainsail called the mizzen.

Schooner Features:

  • At least two masts
  • Usually gaff-rigged
  • One or more headsails
  • Excellent offshore handling
  • Precise control
  • Numerous sail options (headsails, topsails, mizzen)
  • Fast and powerful
  • Complex and labor-intensive rig
  • Difficult to adjust rig single-handed
  • Offshore fishing

Picture a ketch as a sloop or a cutter with an extra mast behind the mainsail. These vessels are seaworthy, powerful, excellent for offshore cruising. A ketch is similar to a yawl, except its larger mizzen doesn't hang off the stern. The ketch is either gaff or Bermuda-rigged.

Ketch-rigged sailboats have smaller sails, and thus, shorter masts. This makes them more durable and controllable in rough weather. The mizzen can help the boat steer itself, which is advantageous on offshore voyages. A ketch is likely slower than a sloop or a cutter, which means you aren't likely to find one winning a race.

Ketch Features:

  • Headsail (or headsails), mainsail, and mizzen
  • Mizzen doesn't extend past the rudder post
  • Good offshore handling
  • Controllable and mild
  • Shorter and stronger masts
  • Easy self-steering
  • Slower than sloops and cutters
  • Less common on the used market

A dinghy is a general term for a small sailboat of fewer than 28 feet overall. Dinghys are often dual-power boats, which means they usually have oars or a small outboard in addition to a sail. These small boats are open-top and only suitable for cruising in protected waters. Many larger sailboats have a deployable dinghy on board to get to shore when at anchor.

Dinghy Features:

  • One or two people maximum capacity
  • Easy to sail
  • Works with oars, sails, or an outboard
  • Great auxiliary boat
  • Small and exposed
  • Not suitable for offshore use
  • Going from anchor to shore
  • Protected recreational sailing (lakes, rivers, and harbors)

Best Sailboat Type for Stability

Stability is a factor that varies widely between sailboat types. There are different types of stability, and some sailors prefer one over another. For initial stability, the trimaran wins with little contest. This is because these vessels have a very high beam-to-length ratio, which makes them much less prone to rolling. Next up is the catamaran, which enjoys the same benefit from a wide beam but lacks the additional support of a center hull section.

It's clear that in most conditions, multihull vessels have the greatest stability. But what about in rough weather? And what about capsizing? Multihull sailboats are impossible to right after a knockdown. This is where full-keel monohull sailboats excel.

Traditional vessels with deep displacement keels are the safest and most stable in rough weather. The shape, depth, and weight of their keels keep them from knocking over and rolling excessively. In many cases, these sailboats will suffer a dismasting long before a knockdown. The primary disadvantage of deep-keeled sailboats is their tendency to heel excessively. This characteristic isn't hazardous, though it can make novice sailors nervous and reduce cabin comfort while underway.

Best Sailboat Type for Offshore Cruising

The best sailboat type for offshore cruising is the schooner. These graceful aid robust vessels have proven themselves over centuries as durable and capable vessels. They typically use deep displacement keels, which makes them stable in rough weather and easy to keep on course.

That said, the full answer isn't quite so simple. Modern multihull designs are an attractive option, and they have also proven to be strong and safe designs. Multihull sailboats are an increasingly popular option for offshore sailors, and they offer comfort that was previously unknown in the sailing community.

Many sailors cross oceans in basic Bermuda-rigged monohulls and take full advantage of a fin-keel design speed. At the end of the day, the best offshore cruising sailboat is whatever you are comfortable handling and living aboard. There are physical limits to all sailboat designs, though almost any vessel can make it across an ocean if piloted by a competent skipper and crew.

Best Sailboat Type for Racing The modern lightweight Bermuda-rigged sailboat is the king of the regatta. When designed with the right kind of hull, these vessels are some of the fastest sailboats ever developed. Many boats constructed between the 1970s and today incorporate these design features due to their favorable coastal and inland handling characteristics. Even small sailboats, such as the Cal 20 and the Catalina 22, benefit from this design. These boats are renowned for their speed and handling characteristics.

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I've personally had thousands of questions about sailing and sailboats over the years. As I learn and experience sailing, and the community, I share the answers that work and make sense to me, here on Life of Sailing.

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Shipbuilder Location Type # Design # Length (ft.) Tons Delivery Disposition
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 1 294 182 630 Apr-43 To Dominican Republic 1946 as 24 de Octobre
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 2 294 182 630 Apr-43 Sold private 1946 as Lucy Reinauer
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 3 294 182 630 Apr-43 Disposition unknown
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 4 294 182 630 Apr-43 To the Philippines 1946 as Y 4
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 5 294 182 630 May-43 Sold private 1946 as Sourdough Queen
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 6 294 182 630 Jun-43 Sold private 1946 as Islander
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 7 294 182 630 Jun-43 To Korea 1946 as Yuchon
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 8 294 182 630 Jul-43 Disposition unknown
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 9 294 182 630 Aug-43 Retired in the 1950s
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 10 294 182 630 Aug-43 Disposition unknown
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 11 294 182 630 Sep-43 Retired in the 1950s
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 12 294 182 630 Oct-43 To Greece 1946 as Marilena
Levingston SB Orange TX Y 13 286 162 484 3/43-8/43 To Hong Kong 1946 as Y 13
Levingston SB Orange TX Y 14 286 162 484 3/43-8/43 Retired in the 1950s
Levingston SB Orange TX Y 15 286 162 484 3/43-8/43 Retired in the 1950s
Levingston SB Orange TX Y 16 286 162 484 3/43-8/43 To the Bahamas 1946 as J. G. MacRallon
Levingston SB Orange TX Y 17 286 162 484 3/43-8/43 Sank
Levingston SB Orange TX Y 18 286 162 484 3/43-8/43 To Hong Kong 1946 as Y 18
Levingston SB Orange TX Y 19 286 162 484 3/43-8/43 To the Philippines 1946 as Y 19
Levingston SB Orange TX Y 20 286 162 484 3/43-8/43 Retired in the 1950s
Levingston SB Orange TX Y 21 286 162 484 3/43-8/43 Disposition unknown
Levingston SB Orange TX Y 22 286 162 484 3/43-8/43 To Panama 1946 as Y 22
Equitable Eqpmt. Mad'ville LA Y 23 286 162 484 6/43-9/43 To Honduras 1946 as Carmen
Equitable Eqpmt. Mad'ville LA Y 24 286 162 484 6/43-9/43 To Panama 1946 as Y 24
Equitable Eqpmt. Mad'ville LA Y 25 286 162 484 6/43-9/43 To Panama 1946 as Y 25
Equitable Eqpmt. Mad'ville LA Y 26 286 162 484 6/43-9/43 To Honduras 1946 as Hilda
Equitable Eqpmt. Mad'ville LA Y 27 286 162 484 6/43-9/43 To Panama 1946 as Y 27
Kyle & Co. Stockton CA Y 28 286 162 484 1/44-6/44 Disposition unknown
Kyle & Co. Stockton CA Y 29 286 162 484 1/44-6/44 Sold private 1946 as J. J. Kelly
Kyle & Co. Stockton CA Y 30 286 162 484 1/44-6/44 Sold private 1946 as Argo
Kyle & Co. Stockton CA Y 31 286 162 484 1/44-6/44 To Norway 1946 as Liten
Kyle & Co. Stockton CA Y 32 286 162 484 1/44-6/44 To Honduras 1946 as Ana
Kyle & Co. Stockton CA Y 33 286 162 484 1/44-6/44 To Norway 1946 as Angelus
Kyle & Co. Stockton CA Y 34 286 162 484 1/44-6/44 To Honduras 1946 as Tania
Kyle & Co. Stockton CA Y 35 286 162 484 1/44-6/44 To the Philippines 1946 as Y 35
    Y 36         Converted pre-war vessel
    Y 37         Converted pre-war vessel
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 38 294 182 630 Oct-43 To USN 1946 as YO 237, later sold private as Franklin Reinauer II
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 39 294 182 630 Oct-43 To USN 1946 as YO 238, later sold as Iriella 1948, to Morocco as Taroudant, to Brazil as Saici, Mario Dias 1957
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 40 294 182 630 Nov-43 To Panama 1946 as Y 40
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 41 294 182 630 Nov-43 Sold private 1946 as Sarah Pinser II
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 42 294 182 630 Nov-43 To Panama 1946 as Unoba
    Y 43         Converted pre-war vessel
Kyle & Co. Stockton CA Y 44 286 162 484 7/44-9/44 Disposition unknown
Kyle & Co. Stockton CA Y 45 286 162 484 7/44-9/44 To the Philippines 1946 as Y 45, later LSCO Balintawak
Kyle & Co. Stockton CA Y 46 286 162 484 7/44-9/44 To USAF 1946 as C-50-1171
Lancaster IW Perryville MD Y 47 294 182 633 7/44-8/44 To Panama 1946 as Y 47
Lancaster IW Perryville MD Y 48 294 182 633 7/44-8/44 Disposition unknown
Lancaster IW Perryville MD Y 49 294 182 633 7/44-8/44 To Norway 1946 as Kloverstrand
Lancaster IW Perryville MD Y 50 294 182 633 10/44-2/45 To China 1946 as Ming Sung No. 1
Lancaster IW Perryville MD Y 51 294 182 633 10/44-2/45 To Russia 1946 on loan
Mathis, John H. Camden NJ Y 52 294 182 633 10/44-3/45 To Panama Canal Co. as Y 52
Mathis, John H. Camden NJ Y 53 294 182 633 10/44-3/45 Disposition unknown
Mathis, John H. Camden NJ Y 54 294 182 633 10/44-3/45 To Russia 1946 on loan
Lancaster IW Perryville MD Y 55 294 182 633 10/44-2/45 To Russia 1946 on loan
Mathis, John H. Camden NJ Y 56 294 182 633 10/44-3/45 To the Philippines 1945. later LSCO Marikudo
Lancaster IW Perryville MD Y 57 294 182 633 10/44-2/45 To Russia 1946 on loan
Lancaster IW Perryville MD Y 58 294 182 633 10/44-2/45 Retired in the 1960s
Mathis, John H. Camden NJ Y 59 294 182 633 10/44-3/45 To the Philippines 1945
Mathis, John H. Camden NJ Y 60 294 182 633 10/44-3/45 Retired in the 1960s
Mathis, John H. Camden NJ Y 61 294 182 633 10/44-3/45 Retired in the 1960s
Mathis, John H. Camden NJ Y 62 294 182 633 10/44-3/45 To Paraguay 1946 as Paraguari
Florida SB Ojus FL Y 63 294 182 627 2/45-5/45 To Paraguay 1946 as Ypora
Florida SB Ojus FL Y 64 294 182 627 2/45-5/45 Retired in the 1960s
Florida SB Ojus FL Y 65 294 182 627 2/45-5/45 To Paraguay 1946 as Ygurey
Florida SB Ojus FL Y 66 294 182 627 2/45-5/45 Served in Korea and Vietnam
Florida SB Ojus FL Y 67 294 182 627 2/45-5/45 Retired in the 1960s, now fish processing plant in Seattle
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 68 294 182 632 Apr-44 To Panama 1946 as Teresa, Eugenia 1993, active in Greece
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 69 294 182 632 Apr-44 To Honduras 1946 as Rose Mary
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 70 294 182 632 Apr-44 To Brazil 1946 as Esso Rio de Janeiro
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 71 294 182 632 May-44 Sold private 1946 as Morania Dolphin
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 72 294 182 632 May-44 To Honduras 1946 as Cynthia
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 73 294 182 632 May-44 Served in Vietnam 1970s
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 74 294 182 632 May-44 To Morocco 1946 as Fedala
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 75 294 182 632 May-44 To Poland 1946 as Turnia
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 76 294 182 632 May-44 To Italy 1946 as Clara G.
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 77 294 182 632 Jun-44 To Italy 1948 as Isonzo, struck 1974
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 78 294 182 632 Jun-44 To Brazil 1946 as Helias
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 79 294 182 632 Jun-44 To Italy 1948 as Ticino, struck 1984
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 80 294 182 632 Jun-44 To Honduras 1946 as Claudia
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 81 294 182 632 Jul-44 To the Netherlands 1946 as Nassau
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 82 294 182 632 Jul-44 To the Netherlands 1946 as Betoeran
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 83 294 182 632 Jul-44 To Honduras 1946 as Tina
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 84 294 182 632 Jul-44 To Brazil 1946 as Propria
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 85 294 182 632 Aug-44 To the Philippines 1945 as Y 85, later LSCO Buan
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 86 294 182 632 Jul-44 Served in Vietnam 1970s
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 87 294 182 632 Aug-44 To USN 1946 as YO 242
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 88 294 182 632 Aug-44 To USN 1946 as YO 243
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 89 294 182 632 Aug-44 To the Netherlands 1946 as Boedoek
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 90 294 182 632 Aug-44 To USN 1946 as YO 244
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 91 294 182 632 Sep-44 To China 1946 as Ming Sung No. 2
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 92 294 182 632 Sep-44 Retired in the 1960s
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 93 294 182 632 Oct-44 To the Philippines 1946 as Stanvac Visayas
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 94 294 182 632 Oct-44 To Russia 1946 on loan
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 95 294 182 632 Oct-44 Retired in the 1960s
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 96 294 182 632 Oct-44 To France 1946 as Y 96
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 97 294 182 632 Oct-44 To Panama 1946 as Caltex 93
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 98 294 182 632 Nov-44 To Greece 1946 as Zeus
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 99 294 182 632 Nov-44 To France 1946 as Y 99
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 100 294 182 632 Nov-44 Served in Vietnam 1970s
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 101 294 182 632 Nov-44 To the Phillipines 1946 as LSCO Lakandula
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 102 294 182 632 Nov-44 To Norway 1946 as Odness
Odenbach SB Rochester NY Y 103 294 182 632 Dec-44 Retired in the 1960s
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 104 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 To Uruguay 1946 as Ancap V
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 105 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 To Brazil 1946 as Maria Luiza
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 106 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 To Brazil 1946 as Maria Celeste
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 107 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 To Italy 1946 as Ortigia
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 108 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 To Panama in ? as Seatown
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 109 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 Retired in the 1960s
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 110 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 To Argentina 1946 as Don Pablo
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 111 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 To Russia 1946 on loan
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 112 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 To Russia 1946 on loan
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 113 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 To Russia 1946 on loan
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 114 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 To Russia 1946 on loan
Kane SB Galveston TX Y 115 294 182 632 6/44-12/44 To Paraguay 1946 as Lago Ypacarai
    Y 116-125         Cancelled
    Y 126-128         Converted pre-war vessels

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Y-Flyer Racing

The Y-Flyer Class offers great one-design dinghy racing with regattas throughout the Southeast, Midwest, Northeast and Canada.  We offer fleets for juniors, beginners and veteran sailors.

2024 Calendar

Regattas for the 2024 Racing Calendar

Past Events & Results

Information on the Mid-America Cup

y class sailboat

The 18-foot kauri-clinker M-Class, first formed in 1922 following designs by Arch Logan and adopted by the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron.

The Emmy, as the M-Class Yacht is affectionately known, is one of the few traditional racing yacht classes that has survived the relentless march of progress. It is testimony to the quality of the Emmy and the dedication of those fine sportsmen committed to it that a class of expensive, wooden clinker boats continues to flourish in a world dominated by exotic, hi-tech materials and keel-boat racing.

Perhaps more than anything else, it is the comradeship that is at the heart of the Emmy’s appeal. For generations of yachties it has been the lasting friendships brought about by the close-knit racing and cruising scene that has made the class so special. At its cornerstone has been the unique facility of the Okahu Bay boat ramp where, with ten to fifteen boats and four or five crew each, the entire complement gather at the same rigging area both before and after the race.

Triumphs and disasters are a shared experience on each boat, to be related and embellished as everybody gathers to assist in the ritual of hauling out ‘the beasts’ over the sometimes treacherous slime on the ramp.

Of the Emmy’s contemporaries in the pre-war dinghy world, none remain. All three of the once- prolific 14-foot classes – T, X and Y – are gone, as has the 16-foot S-Class, which had its heyday in the years up to 1930. The unrestricted 18-foot V-Class, which in the early 1950s evolved into the spectacular Flying 18′s, hung on longest. But they too, have now gone the way of many other open-development classes, their decline hastened by the ever-increasing costs of new technology. (Not surprisingly, though, many of the older and sturdier V’s are still around the Hauraki Gulf, being cruised just as comfortably as always.)

Today the Emmy stands alone as the last of the big, unballasted centreboard dinghies racing on the Waitemata Harbour (or in the rest of New Zealand for that matter). Its survival appears to have been a subtle and finely tuned mixture of good design, tradition, comradeship and plain honest fun, coupled with the gradual introduction of modern ideas without ever sacrificing its ‘essential character’.

While nothing is ever certain, the future of the Emmy is at least promising.

Information courtesy of www.rayc.co.nz/mclass/

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COMMENTS

  1. Y-Flyer Class Sailing

    Sailing our "ironing boards" is what we do. It's how we have fun at home and around the country. We are a family class and it is, most definitely, a family boat. Perfect for husbands and wives, fathers and mothers, sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, and best friends—we've got them all. The Y-Flyer is an 18' fun machine.

  2. Y Flyer

    The Y Flyer is a recreational sailboat, initially built predominantly of wood, later versions were constructed of fiberglass, with wood trim. It has a flexible fractional sloop rig with wooden or aluminum spars and a rotating mast. The hull is a scow design, with a flat bottom, a reverse sheer and a hard hull chine.

  3. Y-Flyer

    About Y-Flyer. A 4 corner, almost flat bottom 500 lb 18 ft scow designed in 1940 by Alvin Youngquist. M & J =160 sq ft. Sailed/Raced by 2. American Y-Flyer Class organized in 1950 and continued since. Canadian Y-Flyer organized in 1945 and continued since. Both Am and Canadian associations joined together as Y-Flyer International Union with by ...

  4. Y FLYER

    Kelsall Sailing Performance (KSP): Another measure of relative speed potential of a boat. It takes into consideration "reported" sail area, displacement and length at waterline. The higher the number the faster speed prediction for the boat. A cat with a number 0.6 is likely to sail 6kts in 10kts wind, a cat with a number of 0.7 is likely ...

  5. Y Flyer

    Y Flyer is a 18′ 2″ / 5.5 m monohull sailboat designed by Alvin Youngquist and built by Helms - Jack A. Helms Co., Turner Marine, and Jibetech starting in 1941. ... the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull ...

  6. Y Flyers of the South

    Designed in 1938 by Alvin Youngquist, of Toledo, Ohio, the uniquely identifiable Y-Flyer is an 18-foot hard-chined, scow-shaped, two-­person dinghy with fleets active throughout the southeastern ...

  7. Y-class lifeboat

    The Y-class lifeboat is a class of small inflatable rescue boat operated by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution of the United Kingdom and Ireland . The Y-class is mainly used as a small tender carried on board the larger RNLI all-weather lifeboats that serve the shores of the UK, and is normally found on the Severn-class [1] and Tamar-class ...

  8. For Sale (List)

    ©2023 by Y-Flyer Class . All Rights Reserved. bottom of page

  9. Class Info

    Y FlyeR Class Info. Here is where the Bylaws, Specs, International rules, Sailing Tips, Our History and Meeting minutes are posted. By-Laws. YFlyer Class By-Laws. American Class > International Class > TUning Guides. YFlyer Class Tuning Guides. Evolution Sails > North Sails > Specifications.

  10. How Princess Yachts has evolved its traditional design

    When revealed in July 2022, the Y Class sistership, Princess Y85 was designed with a new version of the cockpit named 'infinity'. This layout utilises an electrical mechanism that at the touch of a button, can rearrange the seating and dining area to better suit the situation. The sofa-style seating can be brought closer together, while the ...

  11. List of sailing boat types

    The following is a partial list of sailboat types and sailing classes, including keelboats, dinghies and multihull (catamarans and trimarans). Olympic classes Laser. Name Year of first construction Designer Builder Notes 470: 1963: André Cornu: Several: 49er: 1999: Julian Bethwaite: Several: 49er FX: 2010: Julian Bethwaite: Several:

  12. Y80 Luxury Motor Yacht

    Discover a range of motor yachts that's ingeniously crafted to capture your imagination. Meticulously detailed surroundings finished with the finest materials, bathed in space and light, create a compelling conversation between every area of the boat. A sophisticated experience with the power to thrill. Refined.

  13. The Princess Yachts Y Class: Yachts of Distinction

    And while the new expedition-style X Class has brought fresh opportunities at 80 and 95 feet, the imperious Y Class remains a crystal-clear expression of Princess's inherited strengths. Princess Y72: for 'big boat' luxury. Introduced in the summer of 2020, this smallest of the Y Class yachts is an object lesson in on board decadence.

  14. 17 Sailboat Types Explained: How To Recognize Them

    one mast. triangular mainsail (called a Bermuda sail) a foresail (also called the jib) fore-and-aft rigged. medium-sized (12 - 50 ft) Fore-and-aft rigged just means "from front to back". This type of rigging helps to sail upwind. Any sailboat with one mast and two sails could still be a sloop.

  15. Princess Yachts America

    Y CLASS. Discover a world of motor yachting that's ingeniously crafted to capture your imagination. Meticulously detailed surroundings finished with the finest materials, bathed in space and light, create a compelling conversation between every area of the boat. A sophisticated experience with the power to thrill.

  16. Types of Sailboats: A Complete Guide

    The most common kind of sailboat is the sloop, as it's simple to operate and versatile. Other common sailboat types include the schooner, cutter, cat, ketch, schooner, catamaran, and trimaran. Other sailboat variations include pocket cruisers, motorsailers, displacement, and shoal-draft vessels. The information found in this article is sourced ...

  17. US Army Coastal Tankers Y

    A total of 112 coastal tankers, known as Y boats, were built for the U.S. Army by 8 small shipbuilders, notably Odenbach SB, in Rochester NY. All were of steel and were either 162 or 182 feet in length. After the war many were transferred to overseas owners and many became bunkering barges, both in the U.S. and overseas, but large numbers are ...

  18. Yacht classification definitions

    Commercial yacht. A motor or sailing vessel in commercial use (i.e. charter) for sport and pleasure, carrying no cargo and not more than 12 passengers. Private yacht. A pleasure vessel solely used for the recreational and leisure purpose of its owner and his guests. Flag administration.

  19. Yard patrol boat

    Boat classes General characteristics, YP 654 class (YP 663) Primary Function: Training. Builder: Stephens Bros., Inc. (YP 665: Elizabeth City Systems). Propulsion: Four 6-71 Detroit Diesel engines 165 shaft horsepower each @ 1800 rpm, 2 propellers. Length: Overall: 81 ft, 24 meters; Waterline Length: 77 ft, 23.47 meters. ...

  20. Racing

    The Y-Flyer Class offers great one-design dinghy racing with regattas throughout the Southeast, Midwest, Northeast and Canada. We offer fleets for juniors, beginners and veteran sailors. 2024 Calendar. Regattas for the 2024 Racing Calendar. Read More > Past Events & Results. Read More >

  21. Sailing Terms: Sailboat Types, Rigs, Uses, and Definitions

    June 17, 2024. Sailboats are powered by sails using the force of the wind. They are also referred to as sailing dinghies, boats, and yachts, depending on their size. Sailboats range in size, from lightweight dinghies like the Optimist dinghy (7'9") all the way up to mega yachts over 200 feet long. The length is often abbreviated as LOA (length ...

  22. Hanuman Yacht

    Based on the original designs of the 1937 sailing yacht Endeavour II, Hanuman is the most successful winning J-Class on the water today. She offers everything you'd expect from a Royal Huisman: exceptional build quality, optimised performance and enduring strength. Crowned Sailing Yacht of the Year at the World Superyacht Awards in 2009 ...

  23. M-Class

    M-Class. The 18-foot kauri-clinker M-Class, first formed in 1922 following designs by Arch Logan and adopted by the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron. The Emmy, as the M-Class Yacht is affectionately known, is one of the few traditional racing yacht classes that has survived the relentless march of progress. It is testimony to the quality of the ...