• Navigating the Elegance: A Deep Dive into Moody Yachts

When it comes to high-quality sailing yachts, Moody Yachts stands out as a beacon of excellence. With a rich history dating back to 1827, Moody Yachts has built a legacy of producing robust, reliable, and elegantly designed vessels. In this comprehensive guide, we delve into the world of Moody Yachts, focusing on popular models like the Moody 36 and Moody 35.

The Legacy of Moody Yachts

Moody Yachts has a rich history that dates back to 1827. Founded by John Moody, the company initially focused on building wooden boats. Over the years, Moody Yachts transitioned to producing fibreglass yachts, significantly boosting their popularity. Today, Moody Yachts is synonymous with high-quality, reliable sailing vessels.

Among sailors, Moody Yachts is revered for their durability, innovative design, and exceptional craftsmanship. These yachts are designed to withstand the rigours of long-distance sailing while providing comfort and safety. Their solid construction and attention to detail make them a sought-after choice for both novice and experienced sailors.

Exploring the Moody 36

The Moody 36 is a testament to the brand’s commitment to quality and innovation. This model features:

  • A spacious interior with ample headroom
  • A well-equipped galley
  • Comfortable sleeping quarters
  • A sleek hull design and efficient sail plan

On the water, the Moody 36 excels. It offers a balanced and stable ride, making it ideal for both coastal cruising and offshore passages. The yacht’s performance is enhanced by its efficient sail plan and robust construction, ensuring that it can handle a variety of sailing conditions with ease.

Moody 36 CC for Sale

If you’re in the market for a Moody 36 CC, you’ll be pleased to know that these yachts are widely available. The demand for Moody 36 CC yachts remains strong, thanks to their reputation for quality and performance. When searching for a Moody 36 CC, consider both new and pre-owned options to find the best deal.

The Moody 36 CC is renowned for its centre cockpit design, which offers enhanced safety and visibility. This model also boasts a spacious aft cabin, making it a comfortable choice for long-term cruising. The combination of performance, comfort, and safety makes the Moody 36 CC a top choice for discerning sailors.

Comparison: Moody 35 vs Moody 36

While both the Moody 35 and Moody 36 share the brand’s signature quality and craftsmanship, there are notable differences in their design. The Moody 35 features:

  • A more traditional layout
  • Reliable and enjoyable sailing performance

The Moody 36 offers:

  • A more modern, spacious interior
  • Slightly better performance due to its advanced design and larger sail area

When deciding between the Moody 35 and Moody 36, consider factors such as interior space, performance, and your intended use. If you prioritise a modern design and slightly better performance, the Moody 36 is the way to go. If you prefer a more traditional layout with reliable performance, the Moody 35 is an excellent choice.

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Two Super Yachts anchored in the Gulf of Staint-Tropez, one with crew and tender at the back working on deck.

In-Depth Review: Moody 35 and Moody 29

The Moody 35 features a classic design with a well-thought-out layout. The interior is cosy yet functional, with a spacious saloon, a well-equipped galley, and comfortable sleeping quarters. The exterior design is sleek and efficient, ensuring good performance and handling on the water. Owners of the Moody 35 praise its solid performance and reliable handling, making it a joy to sail in various conditions.

The Moody 29, although smaller, packs a punch with its smart design and efficient use of space. The interior is compact yet comfortable, offering all the amenities needed for a pleasant sailing trip. Sailors who own the Moody 29 appreciate its ease of handling and reliable performance. Despite its smaller size, the Moody 29 is known for its stability and solid construction, making it a great choice for both new and experienced sailors.

Moody 346 Reviews and Moody 37 for Sale

The Moody 346 is a popular model known for its spacious interior and excellent sailing performance. This model features:

  • A centre cockpit design for enhanced safety and visibility
  • A large saloon and fully equipped galley
  • Comfortable cabins

Owners of the Moody 346 often highlight its comfort and performance. Many appreciate the yacht’s ability to handle rough seas while providing a comfortable living space. The centre cockpit design is particularly praised for its safety and convenience.

The Moody 37 offers a perfect balance of performance, comfort, and reliability. If you’re looking for a Moody 37 for sale, you’ll find a range of options, from well-maintained pre-owned yachts to brand-new models. The Moody 37 stands out for its spacious interior, excellent sailing performance, and robust construction, making it an ideal choice for extended cruising.

Centre Cockpit Yachts and Cockpit Boats

Centre cockpit yachts offer several advantages, including enhanced safety, better visibility, and more interior space. This design places the cockpit in the centre of the yacht, providing a more stable and secure platform for sailing. Popular Moody models with centre cockpits include the Moody 36 CC and Moody 346.

Cockpit boats come in various designs, each offering unique advantages. The main types include:

  • Aft cockpit
  • Centre cockpit
  • Dual cockpit boats

Owning a cockpit boat provides numerous benefits, including improved visibility, safety, and comfort. The choice of cockpit design can significantly impact your sailing experience, so it’s important to choose the one that best suits your needs.

Tips for Buying a Moody Yacht and Joining the Moody Owners Community

When buying a Moody Yacht, consider factors such as the yacht’s condition, age, and maintenance history. It’s also important to evaluate the interior layout and sailing performance to ensure it meets your needs. Conducting a thorough inspection is crucial. Look for signs of wear and tear, check the condition of the sails and rigging, and ensure all onboard systems are functioning properly. Hiring a professional surveyor can also provide valuable insights.

Negotiating the price of a yacht requires research and preparation. Understand the market value of the yacht you’re interested in, and be prepared to discuss any issues or needed repairs to secure a fair price.

Joining the Moody Owners Group offers numerous benefits, including access to a wealth of knowledge and resources. Members can share experiences, seek advice, and connect with other Moody yacht enthusiasts. The Moody Owners Group provides valuable resources and support, from maintenance tips to cruising guides, enhancing your sailing experience and helping you make the most of your Moody yacht.

Moody Yachts continues to be a leading name in the sailing world, offering a range of high-quality yachts that cater to various sailing needs and preferences. Whether you’re considering the Moody 36, Moody 35, or any other model, you’re sure to find a yacht that meets your expectations in terms of performance, comfort, and reliability. With proper research and careful consideration, you can find the perfect Moody yacht to embark on your next sailing adventure.

So what are you waiting for? Take a look at our range of charter boats and head to some of our favourite  sailing destinations.

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One hundred and fifty years of experience, coupled with unmatched excellence in design and manufacturing. It is qualities like these that have made Moody one of the most illustrious names in the sailing yacht world. Over many generations, Moody has developed an exemplary boat building culture culminating in its current range of deck saloon yachts.

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Moody S38: a good all-round family cruising boat

  • Duncan Kent
  • April 14, 2021

Looking for a good all-round family cruising boat with a good turn of speed, there are plenty of strong contenders, including the Moody S38

A moored Moody S38

An obvious sheer and high topsides make the Moody S38 a dry boat, while the beam carried aft boosts performance. Credit: Duncan Kent

Product Overview

Manufacturer:.

Partners Mick Jeffrey and Val Conway have owned boats and sailed together for decades and have very similar tastes with regard to their preferred type of yacht.

They started cruising many years ago in 
a Westerly Konsort , followed by a Jaguar 
27.

Both were great fun, they say, but a 
little cramped when friends joined them 
for a weekend.

Later, they moved up to a Moody 336, which they sailed extensively for 15 years, appreciating both her extra accommodation, performance under sail and her ability to take them further with less concern about the weather.

The Moody S38 helm is set up for singlehanding

The helm is set up for singlehanding

Four years ago, when Mick retired from his job as IT manager for a large bank, they decided to move up a little more to give them enough accommodation to cruise longer and further, and to provide more comfortable facilities both for themselves and their guests.

Although they looked at other makes, including a Wauquiez and a Sadler Starlight 39, they felt that, having had so few problems over the 15 years they had owned their 336, they had full confidence in the Moody brand.

Being keen on sailing performance, neither wanted a heavy and ponderous centre-cockpit boat, so they were drawn to the lighter and sleeker-looking, aft-cockpit Moody S38 – a natural progression from their 336.

The S38 was Moody’s attempt to 
shake off the rather staid reputation 
that earlier models in this marque had accumulated over the years, especially 
with its earlier Angus Primrose designs.

Designer, Bill Dixon’s brief was to introduce the first aft cockpit ‘performance cruiser’ 
into the Moody stable, and 60 were built 
by Marine Projects in Plymouth.

Moody S39 chart table

The forward-facing chart table on the Moody S38 has space for instrumentation. Credit: Duncan Kent

This 
was indeed achieved thanks to her lighter build, shallower bilges, fine underwater 
lines and lengthy waterline.

Although her standard masthead rig and sail plan 
offered a reasonably generous sail 
area, her sailing performance could 
be improved further still by ordering the fractionally rigged Sport version, with its taller, double spreader mast and extra 7m²/75sq ft of sail area.

Yard options also included a deep or shoal fin keel, both versions sporting a high-aspect, semi-balanced rudder supported by a sturdy half skeg.

Mick and Val’s 1996 model, Chaika , has both the tall rig and the deep fin, although this requirement reduced their choice of available yachts on the market, meaning it took them a while to find a good example 
for sale.

Despite her more streamlined hull, the Moody S38 was actually slightly beamier than the centre-cockpit Moody 38, thus enabling an equally spacious and comfortable accommodation to be created.

The S38’s maximum beam was carried further aft as well, which not only increased her form stability, but also made more space for a decent aft cabin – one 
of the main selling points of the centre cockpit Moodys.

Galley on the Moody S38

A well equipped galley is good for long-term cruising. Credit: Duncan Kent

Mick said: ‘Although we loved the 336, Chaika offers a far better interior for extended cruising, which is what we’re planning to do as soon as Val retires as well. Having two heads in a 38-footer is a real boon and means our guests have their own private facilities to themselves.’

‘We also like the extra space in the aft cabin.’ says Val. ‘Being quite tall, with our 336 it was a real squeeze to get into the 
aft bunk and headroom was almost non-existent.’

When going below you have to take care as the bridge deck is quite high and the companionway steps very steep – more like a ladder in fact.

Mick and Val sensibly choose to descend facing aft, helped by stout handholds each side.

Having an aft cockpit means the saloon has been brought further aft than in the 38CC model, allowing for a larger forecabin and ensuite heads compartment forward.

The Moody S38 was offered with either a large aft ‘owner’s suite’, as with Chaika , or twin double cabins.

This single cabin version has the benefit of a settee as you enter, bags of useful locker space and stowage, and good headroom in the dressing area.

The door is rather narrow, however.

Saloon on the Moody S38

Traditional joinery below gives the boat a homely feel. Credit: Duncan Kent

There’s an emergency escape hatch out to the cockpit above the furthest side of the berth from the door, which is a sensible precaution when your only other exit is through the galley – the most likely place for a fire to start.

The saloon is warm and woody, with ample seating on a good size U-shaped dinette to starboard (that converts to a double berth) and a straight settee opposite that measures 1.94m/6ft 3in long (including trotter box) and makes an ideal sea berth with a lee cloth.

Lockers abound throughout the saloon, galley and forecabin, although the water tanks (2 x 180l) take up most of the space under the seats.

Headroom in the main cabin is a healthy 1.90m/6ft 3in and there are numerous deckhead-mounted handrails to make getting around below when underway much safer.

Two other features were high on Mick and Val’s wish list – a decent galley and a forward-facing chart table.

Both of these are provided in spades by the Moody S38.

She has an impressive, wrap-around galley with everything you might need for long-term cruising including a full-size cooker, deep twin sinks, deep fridge, gash bin and ample stowage for food and cooking utensils.

There’s also a good size forward-facing chart table to port.

A smallish wet locker sits adjacent to the engine room.

Her original engine, a 39hp Volvo MD2040 freshwater-cooled diesel, was powerful for her size and provided plenty of grunt for battling a foul tide.

The larger sail area of the Sport version really boosts light wind performance on the Moody S38

The larger sail area of the Sport version really boosts light wind performance

On deck the S38’s cockpit is comparatively small, although it’s big enough for 3-4 to crew and is deep with nicely angled seatbacks and wide coaming tops.

Single handing is not difficult as the primaries are well within reach of the helm and the coachroof-mounted mainsheet is easy to reach around the smallish wheel.

All reefing controls and the kicker are brought aft to the coachroof winches 
and clutches.

Stowage is reasonable in two shallow lockers, while the helm seat lifts up and a door in the transom opens to provide easy access to a deep step and folding boarding ladder.

Her decks are wide with good non-slip, and the foredeck has fittings for warps and ground tackle.

Mick says ‘The extra few feet on the mast in the Sport model increases the size of the mainsail, which provides more power in light airs. It does, though, mean she likes to be reefed early. We tend to put the first reef in the main at around 15 knots true for comfort. The jib, though, is small and the foot cut quite high, making it easier to see ahead in crowded waters.’

The standard furling genoa was 130%, which gives enough power upwind without making tacking too much like hard work.

Off the wind the Moody S38 is a moderately quick cruiser

Off the wind the Moody S38 is a moderately quick

When Yachting Monthly test sailed a similarly specced Moody S38 shortly after the official launch, we found her to be responsive and powerful, yet still easy to handle when hard onto the wind with 24 knots over the decks.

Her steering is positive, but not the lightest until she gets into her groove.

Off the wind she’s moderately (by modern cruising yacht standards) quick and holds her course with few alterations to her helm.

The only problems Mick and Val have encountered in their four years of ownership has been with the saildrive gearbox, which failed on them at sea.

Despite this, they managed to sail her back into the marina without incident, 
‘a token to her excellent handling characteristics under sail,’ says Mick.

What the experts say about the Moody S38

James Jermain, Yachting Monthly boat tester and former editor

Her performance is a step ahead of the older 38, but it takes the taller fractional rig to put her truly into the sports cruiser class.

Above all she is a good all-rounder, capable of taking families offshore in safety or just pottering along the coastline in comfort.

Nick Vass, Marine Surveyor
(www.omega-yachtservices.co.uk)

Although she was constructed to Moody’s usual high standards and every hull was built to Lloyd’s specifications, some of the early Moody S38s suffered from various defects, including delamination, cracking and bulging on the coachroof above the forward heads compartment bulkhead, and again over the aft bulkheads where the bulkhead itself did not appear to fit properly.

Also watch out for delamination/bulging around the anchor locker drain and on the topsides below the stanchion bases.

They got better during the production run, however, with these few teething problems being quickly corrected on the original boats.

Duncan Kent, freelance yacht and equipment reviewer

The Moody S38 was a step, rather than a whole leap ahead for Moody at a time 
when the French production yards were launching lighter, faster, beamier yachts 
for a group of sailors keen to sail faster but without sacrificing the comforts of a luxurious accommodation.

Looking closely at the figures, the Moody S38 was in fact more moderate than extreme.

Her displacement to waterline length ratio of 242 put her in the moderate performance class, as did her modest 15.4 sail area to displacement ratio.

Though greater than most of the European 38-footers of that period, her sail area, even on the tall rig model, was less than the sportier Sweden Yachts 390 and Finngulf 38.

The taller rig is countered, however, by a deep fin keel, a healthy 36% ballast to displacement ratio and additional form stability provided by carrying the maximum beam a long way aft.

High topsides and pronounced positive sheer allow her to carve through the waves with a gentle nodding motion with little spray landing on the decks.

Alternatives to consider

Sadler starlight 39.

The Starlight 39 can be race or cruised shorthanded

The Starlight 39 can be race or cruised shorthanded

Built by Bowman after the demise of Sadler Yachts, the Stephen Jones-designed Starlight 39 was conceived as a fast and seaworthy cruising boat that could be raced or cruised short-handed.

Although deep fin and shoal keels were offered, many owners opted for the more novel wing keel, which was intended to increase lift and stability when sailing to windward.

It also reduced her draft to 1.60m/5ft 3in and helped support her when taking the ground.

The hand-laminated hulls were built 
using isopthalic resins and, like all 
Sadlers before her, a one-piece GRP interior moulding incorporating fixings for bulkheads and furniture was bonded to the outer 
hull and the gap between filled with 
closed-cell polyurethane foam for buoyancy 
and insulation.

Below, she has berths for six crew in two double ensuite cabins and the saloon, which has a warm, woody finish but with the four good size windows keeping it bright and airy.

The double drop-leaf table seats six comfortably and the galley is well-equipped for cruising with generous stowage, although it lacks preparation space.

Continues below…

Moody 41 DS

Moody 41 DS: A deck saloon that pushes all boundaries

Adopting a fresh approach to deck-saloon design, the Moody 41 DS is an exceptionally roomy cruiser that pushes a lot…

where are moody yachts built

Moody 45DS Saloon

A saloon with a view

Moody 42

Moody 42 – Yachting Monthly review

Duncan Kent sails the Moody 42 and finds a comfortable family cruiser equally suited to ocean crossings

She also has a decent navigation station with forward-facing chart table and room for plenty of charts, plotting gear, pilot 
books and displays.

Behind it is a locker for oilskins.

The Sadler Starlight 39 is a speedy and seaworthy alternative

The Sadler Starlight 39 is a speedy and seaworthy alternative. Credit: David Harding

Her cockpit is a little small due to the large bridge deck, which can make going below awkward at times.

However, it is deep and safe with high coamings and easy foot bracing. Stowage is generous, too.

Her tall masthead sloop rig supplies plenty of power, even in light airs, and the fully battened main with aft-led reefing lines simplifies handling.

Typical of Jones’ designs, the Starlights were renowned for their upwind performance and sea kindly manners.

She’s fast, points well and tacks deftly, while her helm remains light yet positive.

Westerly Typhoon 37

Heavily built, the Westerly Typhoon 37 tracks well up and downwind

Heavily built, the Typhoon tracks well up and downwind. Credit: David Harding

The Ed Dubois-designed Typhoon was an attractive, streamline, sporty performance cruiser with a sumptuous interior for her day.

The hulls were heavily built using solid laminates, but with a balsa-cored deck.

Her 7/8ths fractional rig makes her a powerful performer who can be handled easily by a couple alone.

She has a huge aft cabin with settee and bags of stowage, but the clearance above the double berth is restricted a little by the cockpit well.

The forecabin is smaller but still has a heads and washbasin.

A large proportion of the main cabin is taken up with an excellent galley and large navigation station, at the expense of the saloon dining area, which is positioned well forward.

Headroom is over 6ft throughout, though, and the quality of furniture construction top-notch, with endless rich, warm teak on show.

On deck she has a large, well-organised cockpit, wheel steering and stout deck gear and winches.

Although the mainsheet track runs across immediately forward of the wheel, the primaries are on plinths by the companionway so well out of reach of the helm.

All other sail control lines are led aft to another pair of self-tailers on the coachroof.

Under sail, the Typhoon is reasonably quick and easy to handle, pointing well to windward and passing through tacks swiftly.

Her deep spade rudder and fin keel keep her well in the groove upwind and tracking on rails downwind, with only the lightest touch needed on her helm to keep her 
on course.

Sweden Yachts 390

Very pretty lines and a sleek coachroof make the Sweden Yachts 390 an extremely attractive yacht.

The Sweden Yachts 390 is sporty, but still well set up for long term cruising

The Sweden Yachts 390 is sporty, but still well set up for long term cruising. Credit: David Harding

Using the IOR-inspired hull of the original Peter Norlin designed SY38, the 390 had a completely revamped and much improved deck and interior but kept the fine bow overhang and retroussé transom.

She is stoutly constructed with a balsa cored hull and deck, reinforced floor grid and bonded bulkheads.

The layout below is ideal for long-term cruising, with two double cabins, a quarterberth and two straight saloon settees/sea berths with lee cloths.

She has a good size galley to port and a large, outboard facing chart table to starboard.

The saloon is very comfortable and roomy with loads of warm mahogany.

Although forward of the saloon, the head is spacious and effectively ensuite to the forecabin.

Stowage is very good all round, although there are water tanks beneath both settees, and there’s over 1.90m/6ft 3in headroom throughout.

Her cockpit is well organised and set up for short-handed sailing, with the primary winches and double-ended mainsheet within easy reach of the helm.

Wide side decks lead to a clutter-free, flush foredeck.

Her tall, 7/8ths fractional rig and powerful sail plan make her a genuine performance yacht that ploughs on through the seas at an impressive lick shrugging off oncoming waves.

Despite being slick and close-winded, she is responsive, light on the helm and easy to handle in all but the worst conditions.

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16-12-2016, 12:06  
Boat: Jeanneau 57
, what will most likely be my last , a Moody 64.
This had a rather short production time, I'm mostly interested in the fresher ones like say 2003-2005.
Over the past year or so I've checked the offerings from various brokers for this boat. One thing I've noticed frequently are claims for various systems that had been completely overhauled or replaced. The question that comes to my mind is why did things need or replacement?

Today I own a 2006 SO49 and despite the poor reputation of the "poor build quality" of these industrial , mine has had zero issues. Nothing has been overhauled or has needed replacement. All I've done are simply upgrades like , more AH, you know the usual toys we all think we need to have.

For this reason, before I jump into this I want to ask you Moody owners: how is your boat holding up through the years?
Are there any known issues with these ? Anything particular I should pay attention to?

Of course, I realize that a 13-14 years old boat will be needing a major .
I'm ready for new , new , whatever worn out items, and generatore and eventually a new .

There's some major involved, I know and I'm ready for it!
All this makes only sense though is the "base boat" is worth it.
This is probably my biggest question. Is a Moody build in the years I mentioned really worth my time and ?

Thanks in advance for any and all suggestions!

Loredo
16-12-2016, 12:43  
Boat: Moody 31
and et al will be bought from the same sort of suppliers as , and HR etc.

As you have found out they will require upgrades etc.

What I will say is the Moody range of yachts were not , indeed its the reason they gave up building the smaller yachts because they couldn't compete with the huge German and French builders on without lowering quality. Some 28 years on since our Moody was built I haven't encountered problems with the quality of materials or the construction which I consider to be very high.

There is a very active owners association:



Pete
16-12-2016, 14:36  
Boat: Wauquiez Hood 38
16-12-2016, 16:44  
is OK but could have been better although ours is a 42 not a 64. We have found it to be good value all in all and would buy another one. Ours was a shoal and it doesn't point up with the deeper boats but it does very well off the . Our was a bit over 18 days with 4 of them in the mid 170's and several in the 160's so it does quite well on passages.
17-12-2016, 11:30  
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
one year, and came in second ahead of not only the whole fleet of cruising boats, but the whole fleet but for only one boat.


The Moody 64 is from the last generation of Moodys, when the maker, at the time the oldest yacht in the world, was trying to back its historic clientele from upstart . In the '70's and '80's, Moody had started to build smaller and cheaper yachts, and had started to lose its higher end client base. So at the end of the '90's, Moody started to fight back, introducing first the 54 (and my boat was the prototype), then the Moody 47, then the 64, then the 49, all of them finished to a higher standard and highly specified.

In the end, Moody this battle with and went bankrupt.

So what are the good and bad points of this, last generation of Moodys?

Good points:

1. The structure is built to extremely high standards, second to none I think. The chain plates on my boat are bigger than the ones on a Swan 90 I spent some time on -- they must weigh 50 pounds each, and appear to have been stolen off a railroad bridge. These boats are fully stick built with no liner, no grid, etc. The bulkheads are fully glassed in and through-bolted. They are truly built like brick houses. You will notice a very big difference compared to your .

2. The boats sail very well. They are much lighter than the corresponding Oysters, because they are fully cored with encapsulated balsa blocks, a more expensive and stronger construction than solid glass. They have semi-balanced partial spade rudders, and the rig and underbody are well designed. Light, well-balanced , and quite fast.

3. These boats are very highly specified in terms of , much better than the base specification of comparable Oysters. My boat has 8 winches, 4 of them powered, and has all the best stuff from the Selden catalogue including towable heavy duty cars, traveler with dedicated winches, etc., etc, etc.

4. Very high quality installations and systems.

5. Very good tankage (most of the are sourced from the superb Tech company, made of plastic)

6. A lot of good design points, like transparent plexiglass counterbalanced washboard and scuttle, filler in the dog house roof and not at level, cofferdam around the bow thruster, etc., etc., etc. Bill Dixon is a great , and it shows in lots of the little things.

Some weak points:

1. They are not, in my opinion, as beautiful to look at as some others, like the Holman & Pye designed Oysters, but it's a matter of taste.

2. They are "raised saloon" boats like Oysters (actually this configuration was pioneered by Moody in the '60's), but with a huge drawback -- you can't see out of or open the forward windows -- they are vestigial. What a shame! This is really nice in Oysters and Discoveries -- you can look out over the bow from the , and you can open these windows to let the breeze in at . When I bought my boat, I was choosing between this and an Oyster 485, and I almost didn't buy the Moody because of this.

3. The fitout is inferior to Discovery and Oyster. The materials are good -- no chip board anywhere (unlike in Oysters), but the is inferior and the design is just not as high end looking. Still a BIG step up from regular mass production boats.

4. The company doesn't exist any more, so forget about any kind of organized support. The , Bill Dixon, is of course still in business, and many of the original craftsmen are still working out of the old Moody yard (now Swanwick Marina on the Hamble River), but there is no actual support as we know it.



So those would be the main points. There is nothing wrong with your -- in fact this is my favorite mass produced yacht. These were still stick built up into the early 2000s. They sail well and are very well designed. The main disadvantages compared to higher end boats is that they are not as strong structurally, and the fitout doesn't hold up as well over time. But otherwise these are great boats and great value for the money.
17-12-2016, 19:23  
Boat: a sailing boat
19-12-2016, 08:48  
Boat: Jeanneau 57
(for a center cockpit).
rig.
Highly spec'd deck harware.
The in a separated zone; no walk-through to a .
NO waste-space garage.
Like Dockhead pointed out, tons of space. (I don't like crowded places) then I can spend a lot of money to get my dream boat and still spend less than in a new one.

Dockhead, at the end of the day your boat is very similar to the 64. Anything I should or need look for when I'm going to visit the boat(s)?
Anything in particular that you've noticed on your boat that I should check out?

The problem is that none of the boats is near to me. I'll have to take flights to visit them. Thus, I don't feel like sending "my" to visit the boats before I have seen them on my own.

Thanks,

Loredo
19-12-2016, 09:24  
, questionable , not happy with the deck joint, it seemed to leak where the aluminium backing plate that ran the length of the boat was screwed and riveted. If you wanted to get at any pipe wire etc it was a nightmare.I've now got a Malo which whilst not without the odd quirk is just a joy to on. Sorry don't kid yourself you are getting Swedish or Dutch quality on the . This is sent with a heavy heart. We looked hard at a m47 but just couldn't face the same issues again. Good luck with your search.
20-12-2016, 02:17  
was contracted out?

Best,

Jack.
20-12-2016, 04:42  
Boat: Cheoy Lee, 44 Cutter. Dolce Far Niente
at any time in its .
Before the state of was even officially a state, Caleb Hodgdon was building boats along its shores. Specifically, he constructed wooden schooners, starting in 1816, for the fleet of Boothbay Harbor. They are still around.

Also under no conditions is a cored , even encapsulated balsa, or the much stiffer "Aramat" stronger than solid glass construction.
20-12-2016, 04:47  
Boat: Wauquiez Hood 38
20-12-2016, 04:51  
Boat: ‘01 Catana 401
20-12-2016, 09:02  
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
.
Before the state of was even officially a state, Caleb Hodgdon was building boats along its shores. Specifically, he constructed wooden schooners, starting in 1816, for the fleet of Boothbay Harbor. They are still around.

where are moody yachts built

20-12-2016, 09:12  
Boat: Cutter-Rigged Moody 54
20-12-2016, 09:28  
Boat: Moody 31
work for small vessels and yachts etc now. C&N worked very closely with Halmatic just up the harbour from them and also now gone.

The Moody boat building business certainly goes back a while but probably not the oldest. I have their history book somewhere so must dig it out.

The older generation of yachts were probably designed by Angus Primrose and substantial numbers are still sailing today. Easily identified by the flare in the bows.

The C&N 55 is a lovely yacht designed in an era when yachts looked like yachts and large crews were easily available and didn't need much space. However, most would need some serious work to be an acceptable cruising yacht. They were lifting out the Royal 55s a couple of years ago so I stopped by and asked how they kept the topsides immaculate. Answer they are painted every few years.
 
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The Moody 35 is a 34.5ft masthead sloop designed by Bill Dixon and built in fiberglass by Moody Yachts (A. H. Moody & Sons) between 1990 and 1996.

192 units have been built..

The Moody 35 is a moderate weight sailboat which is slightly under powered. It is stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser. The fuel capacity is originally small. There is a short water supply range.

Moody 35 for sale elsewhere on the web:

where are moody yachts built

Main features

Model Moody 35
Length 34.50 ft
Beam 11.88 ft
Draft 3.92 ft
Country United Kingdom (Europe)
Estimated price $ 0 ??

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where are moody yachts built

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Sail area / displ. 14.56
Ballast / displ. 39.47 %
Displ. / length 247.78
Comfort ratio 24.93
Capsize 2.01
Hull type Monohull twin Keel
Construction Fiberglass
Waterline length 28.83 ft
Maximum draft 3.92 ft
Displacement 13300 lbs
Ballast 5250 lbs
Hull speed 7.19 knots

where are moody yachts built

We help you build your own hydraulic steering system - Lecomble & Schmitt

Rigging Masthead Sloop
Sail area (100%) 509 sq.ft
Air draft 0 ft ??
Sail area fore 285.19 sq.ft
Sail area main 223.44 sq.ft
I 42.25 ft
J 13.50 ft
P 35.75 ft
E 12.50 ft
Nb engines 1
Total power 35 HP
Fuel capacity 44 gals

Accommodations

Water capacity 51 gals
Headroom 0 ft
Nb of cabins 0
Nb of berths 0
Nb heads 0

Builder data

Builder Moody Yachts (A. H. Moody & Sons)
Designer Bill Dixon
First built 1990
Last built 1996
Number built 192

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The Moody 34 Sailboat Specs & Key Performance Indicators

The Moody 34 is a classic cruising sailboat that was designed by Bill Dixon and built by Moody Yachts in England. It features a centre cockpit, a fin keel, a masthead sloop rig, and a spacious interior with two cabins and a separate head. It's known for its solid construction, comfortable sailing performance, and generous storage space, and is a popular choice for long-distance cruising or liveaboard sailing.

A Moody 34 sailboat at anchor in Falmouth Harbour, Antigua

Published Specification for the Moody 34

Underwater Profile:  Fin keel & Skeg-Hung Rudder;

Hull Material : GRP;

Length Overall : 33'5" / 10.2m;

Waterline Length : 27'9" / 8.5m;

Beam : 11'8" / 3.6m;

Draft : 5'0" / 1.5m;

Rig Type : Masthead sloop;

Displacement : 11,200lb / 5,080kg;

Designer : Bill Dixon;

Builder :  Marine Projects Ltd (UK);

Year First Built : 1983;

Owners Association :  Moody Owners Association

Read more about the current range of Moody Yachts...

Published Design Ratios for the Moody 34

1. Sail Area/Displacement Ratio:  16.6

2. Ballast/Displacement Ratio:  40.2

3. Displacement/Length Ratio:  234

4. Comfort Ratio:  22.3

5. Capsize Screening Formula:   2.1

read more about these all-revealing numbers...

Summary Analysis of the Design Ratios for the  Moody 34

eBook: How to Avoid Buying the Wrong Sailboat

1. A Sail Area/Displacement Ratio of 16.6 suggests that the Moody 34 will, in the right conditions, approach her maximum hull speed readily and satisfy the sailing performance expectations of most cruising sailors.

2. A Ballast/Displacement Ratio of 40.2 means that the Moody 34 will stand up well to her canvas in a blow, helping her to power through the waves.

3. A Displacement/Length Ratio of 234, tells us the Moody 34 is a moderate displacement cruiser, which means she'll carry all your cruising gear without it having a dramatic effect on her performance. Most of today's sailboats intended for offshore cruising fall into this displacement category.

4. Ted Brewer's Comfort Ratio of 22.3 suggests that crew comfort of a Moody 34 in a seaway is similar to what you would associate with the motion of a coastal cruiser with moderate stability, which is not encouraging news for anyone prone to seasickness.

5. The Capsize Screening Formula (CSF) of 2.1 indicates that a Moody 34 would not be the wisest choice of sailboat for ocean passage-making owing to the lower resistance to capsize in strong winds and heavy seas that is associated with sailboats with a CSF of 2.0 and above.

Any Questions?

Is the Moody 34 still in production and, if not, when did production end and how many of these sailboats were built?

No, the Moody 34 is not still in production. Production ended in 1986 after 165 units were built.

What is the history of the builders of the Moody 34 and is the company still in business?

The builders of the Moody 34 are Moody Yachts, a British company that was founded in 1827 by John Moody. The company has a long and distinguished history of building quality sailing yachts for various markets and purposes. The company went through several changes of ownership and management over the years, and is currently owned by HanseYachts AG, a German company that also owns Dehler, Hanse, Fjord, Sealine, and Privilège.

What keel options are available for the Moody 34?

One verion of the Moody 34 has a fin keel and a skeg-hung rudder; another has a bilge keel with a draft of 3'9".

How many berths does the Moody 34 have?

The Moody 34 has six berths in two cabins and the saloon. The forward cabin has a V-berth that can be converted into a double berth with an infill cushion. The aft cabin has a double berth that can be accessed from both sides. The saloon has two settees that can be used as single berths.

What is the Moody 34 like to sail?

The Moody 34 is a well-balanced and easy-to-handle sailboat that can perform well in various wind and sea conditions. It has a moderate displacement of about 5 tons (11,023 pounds) and a moderate sail area to displacement ratio of about 16. It has a good hull speed of about 7 knots (8 miles per hour) and can point up to about 45 degrees off the wind.

What is the average cost of a secondhand Moody 34?

The average cost of a secondhand Moody 34 depends on the condition, equipment, location, and age of the boat. According to YachtWorld , the current asking prices for Moody 34 boats for sale range from £25,689 to £69,995 (about $33,800 to $92,000). According to Apollo Duck , the current asking prices for Moody 34 boats for sale range from £36,000 to £42,000 (about $47,300 to $55,200).

What other sailboats have been created by the designer of the Moody 34?

The designer of the Moody 34 is Bill Dixon, a British naval architect who has designed many other sailboats for various brands and markets. Some of his other designs include the Moody Eclipse series, the Moody Halberdier series, the Westerly Ocean series, the Taswell series, the Hylas series, the Discovery series, the Clipper series, and the Azuree series

The above answers were drafted by sailboat-cruising.com using GPT-4 (OpenAI’s large-scale language-generation model) as a research assistant to develop source material; to the best of our knowledge,  we believe them to be accurate.

Other sailboats in the Moody range include:

A Moody 33 sailboat under sail

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Moody quality opinions

  • Thread starter Guest
  • Start date 8 Feb 2002

Hello all, this is just a general question to the forum for opinions on Moody yachts in general. Living in the US I hardly ever see any adverts or comments on Moodys. In your opinion, where would Moody yachts fall in the quality scale? High, medium, low? Just curious. I own a 1967 Moody Halberdier which I love and feel is built like the proverbial tank but that's just my opinion. I'd love to hear from other Moody owners. Regards Craig Poole  

marklongstaff

Craig I own a 1990 Moody 376 which we keep in Southampton and have no problems with the quality or the weight of build. It is my opinion however that despite the fact that I like the new range of Moodys I can't help but feel some of the final finishing leave a little to be desired - that said if I had a spare £300k or so a New "BIG" Moody could very well be on the shortlist!! Regards Mark L.  

gunnarsilins

gunnarsilins

I have a older.... ....Moody 42, built 1977. I would say, in average the quality is good. If I should critisize, I would say the attention to detail and extreme finish can be lacking sometimes: A bit of rough glassfibre here and there in unseen places and the woodwork is not up to the absolutely highest standards. But she seems to be strong and durable, so I´m not complaining really. I have not been able to have a closer look on the recent Moody´s but if they are of similar quality I wouldn´t hesitate to buy or recommend a new one. Apart from the fact that I neither can afford it or have any longing for these sportier and "harbour-friendlier" yachts.  

Even at the other end of the Moody range you get a build quality superior to the true mass market. The Moody 31 is a well-built boat, which is reflected in their resale values. I think that it is a shame that Moody has failed to invest in production automation that would have enabled it to compete in the Ben/Bav/Jen +15% price position. Our Moody 31 is now going up for sale, but unfortunately there seems to be nothing between the mass-market models, and the premium bespoke models. Jeremy Flynn www.yacht-goldeneye.co.uk  

Just to endorse what has already been said. We own a Moody 31 mark 2 and if anything the workmanship on this 15 year old far exceeds what you will find on a recently built vessel. Easy to handle, comfortable and confident in a blow. What imprest most when we first stepped on board was the feeling you were on a very sturdy and safe boat - unlike some modern day vessels (not Moodys') where you step up onto the gunwhale and the mast meets you half way! Cheers  

Have you seen the Moody Owners site www.moodyowners.org.uk/ I took delivery of a new 28 in 1986 followed by a 336 in 1990 followed by a 38 last year. The 336 & 28 were well but carefuly used and stood the test of time. The 38 looks promising. I think they fit between the Bav/Jen/Ben boats and the HR & Najads. Medium weight and sail reasonably. I lilke them but I would say that being on my third!!! Pete  

richardknight

We own a 1978 Moody 30 which we keep down in Poole Harbour. The ironic thing is when we were looking a few years ago we really never thought we'd end up with a Moody as they seemed expensive to us. Only when we had a really good look around did we realise that wasn't really the case. Although a 1978 boat she's generally in really good condition and has stood the test of time well. That says something very positive for the build quality......and probably the previous owners too. She's a sturdy boat and one which we feel very safe in. I'd also rate her as above the Beneteau/Jeanneau's of this world, but below the Hallberg Rassy for example. We're impressed enough to believe she'll be a long term boat for us.  

Twister_Ken

Twister_Ken

Well-known member.

No personal experience at all, but I do seem to remember some fuss and furore many years back about Moody rudders (delaminating?) and a suggestion that some models were rather osmosis prone. I'm just going to duck to avoid the Revenge of the Moodiesta!  

last year we bought a Moody 336 built in 1990 to replace our Westerley Fulmar. The boat is fantastic on a reach or run, but slams into a headwind and sea. Other problems have been a lack of storage space and less design considerations into producing a good sea going boat, unlike the fulmar. Having said this, overall the boat build quality is good and far exceeds the french workmanship as one would expect. We also expect a good resale value in a couple of years.  

jamesjermain

jamesjermain

Active member.

Just to put the cat among the pigeons, none of the previous posts refer to Moodys actually built by A H Moody, which yours was. All the Moody's referred to were/are built by Marine Projects in Plymouth to Bill Dixon designs from briefs drawn up by the Moody board (David and John, in practice) and the MP key personnel of David King and SImon Limb. Moody Marketing handle the sales in the UK, MP distribute the boats overseas. Marine Projects also builds the Princess range of power boats and has an extremely automated operation with all the usual computer controlled laser cutters etc but not, I believe, robots (a la Bavaria) as yet. The Alan Hill-designed Halberdier and a range of others such as the Laurent Giles-designed Carbineer were fitted out at Moody's Swanwick yard although I believe the hulls were contract-moulded by Marine Construction. Having wittered on about that, I can only confirm what others have said, which is that Moody/Marine Projects build boats which are one up on the general run of mass produced craft. The older ones such as yours are very stout and strong, with solid joinery inside massively over-engineered hulls. Moody stopped building their own boats for economic reasons and lack of space in the late seventies. The MP Moodies are generally very good, middle-of-the-road designs, long on practicality and durability, short on flashy style and, as others have said, that little je ne sais quois which the French are so good at and which rocked the British boat building industry in the seventies and eighties. Moody's centre cockpit style has also helped them carve out a market of their own against the largely charter orientated Continental brands. In an American context I would put them ahead of Hunters and Catalinas, perhaps more in line with Morris and Valiant, fror example JJ  

castaway

Hi Craig Told u it was a good site didnt I? As you can see from the responses Moodys are still a quality yacht even if not quite so hand built as in the days when our Halberdiers first left the shed. I think that most people would put Moodys at the very top end of the quality list. Back in the late 60s and early 70s it was even more so. Regards Nick  

Bilge or fin? My fin was fine...  

err when ie how long ago?  

I agree - good boats (although their modern incarnation are a little too boat show driven) and compared to the rest of the USA market they are a good cut above the most common boats. I would always feel safer going to sea in a Moody vs a Hunter or a Catalina. I think this is because the Moody's are desinged for the English Channel and not for Florida and SoCal.  

Also helped by the fact the designer used to and may well still sails his designs!!!!  

Moodys from.... ...the seventies designed by Angus Primrose, like mine Moody 42 ketch (and maybe the 30, 31 and 33) were moulded by a company called Robert Ives. But they were fitted out by Moodys, weren´t they?  

Re: Moodys from.... The 31 was definitely built by Marine Projects. There's a metal plaque on mine to prove it! Jeremy Flynn www.yacht-goldeneye.co.uk  

Re: Moodys from.... You may be right that your Moody 42 was completed by A H Moody itself. They continued to build some of the bigger models longer than I may have implied - particularly the 471 and the 58. However, the Angus Primrose 33 was his first design for Moody and was the first to go to Marine Projects. The 333, 33S, 27, 29, 30, both 31s, 36, 39, 40 and 41 were all built by Marine Projects as were all subsequent designs such as the 34/346, 336, 376 etc drawn by Bill Dixon, Angus Primrose's protege, who continued to trade under the Primrose name for many years after the latter's tragic death. The 42 was a little different from all of these and may well have stayed in house. JJ  

I'm on my second moody (this time a 36) and like the boat a lot. We've had a few small niggles over the years but Moody have always been very good on the aftersales side and sorted things completely (even if they have taken a while some times!). The quality is nearly firts class - much better than the French and German boats - but not as good as the likes of Hallberg/Najad/ Malo etc. Very strongly built but a little slow in light winds. Stowage is superb and, to my tastes at least, nicely designed. Personally if you can't go to one of the Swedish or other really expensive boats I think they're the next best option.  

maybe 12-15 years back, tho' I guess the boats concerned were older than that. Severe test of an ageing memory!  

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  • Sailboat Guide

Moody 28 is a 27 ′ 5 ″ / 8.4 m monohull sailboat designed by Bill Dixon and Angus Primrose and built by Moody Yachts (A. H. Moody & Sons) between 1985 and 1987.

Drawing of Moody 28

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

Draft for Fin Keel model: 5’’.

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where are moody yachts built

Inside the last company building boats in Boston

W henever you drive the Tobin Bridge, just before you leave Charlestown, you’re passing over the last company making boats in Boston.

Along the Mystic River, with several of the Tobin’s trestles planted in the parking lot, Boston Boatworks is continuing a tradition that reaches back centuries. Boston has built boats big and small, from the USS Constitution constructed in the North End, to the clipper ships of Donald McKay’s shipyard in East Boston, to the “unsinkable” Boston Whaler, designed in Braintree.

Walk into Boston Boatworks, and you’re greeted by the smell of the special glue the company uses to make the carbon fiber hulls of its watercraft. Go a little further, and you’ll encounter a half-dozen boats in various stages of construction — including an electric ferry for a popular campground on Three Mile Island in Lake Winnipesaukee.

Boston Boatworks started life in 1995, as a partnership between Scott Smith, Mark Lindsay, and Geoff Berger. (Lindsay, a renowned designer of sailboats, died in 2019, and Berger is now CEO of Hinckley Yachts, a Rhode Island manufacturer.) The company’s original home was East Boston, in the former Bethlehem Atlantic Works shipyard, which repaired ships for the Navy and Coast Guard.

It outgrew its space there and moved in 2014 to a three-story building with offices on the top, a factory floor, and massive roll-up doors at both ends. One of those roll-up doors faces the Mystic, where docks and a lift allow the company to get boats in and out of the water.

Boston Boatworks first made custom racing sailboats, but eventually concluded that that market was too small. But the company realized that lightweight materials and designs used to make sailboats faster had not penetrated the world of powerboats.

With powerboats, Smith explained, “you can overcome a lot of design deficiencies just by adding more horsepower. Our approach was to take weight out of the boat, use smaller engines — which have less fuel consumption — and materials that don’t fatigue as the boat ages.”

Rather than traditional fiberglass, Boston Boatworks chose to use more expensive carbon fiber — which is lighter, stiffer, and tougher — and borrowed manufacturing techniques from aircraft production, which also uses the material. If you’ve seen the Encore Casino’s water shuttles — built at a cost of about $1 million each — you’ve seen their work.

In the early 2000s, Boston Boatworks was approached by a North Carolina company, MJM Yachts, to build a line of ocean-going yachts; MJM wanted to marry Boston Boatworks’ manufacturing expertise with a sleek, low-slung design from Doug Zurn, a naval architect in Marblehead.

MJM quickly became Boston Boatworks’ largest customer. But in 2019, Boston Boatworks’ relationship with MJM abruptly ended when MJM decided to set up its own factory in North Carolina, citing lower labor and other costs.

That forced Boston Boatworks to scramble. One lifeline came from a $20 million contract to build 10 boats for the Barton & Gray Mariner’s Club, a New Hampshire company that is like Zipcar for the yachting set. Members can reserve a boat and captain in places such as Nantucket, East Hampton, or Boca Raton.

That deal let Barton & Gray design a boat especially for its members, who go out for the day rather than on overnight trips. What had been a sleeping cabin in the Hinckley yachts the club offers became an outdoor space in the bow. The kitchen moved upstairs so that people could more easily gather around the food.

The 48-foot boat, called the Daychaster, is longer, wider, and larger than the Hinckleys, but it is 15 to 20 percent more fuel efficient because of the materials used by Boston Boatworks, said Douglas Gray, Barton & Gray’s cofounder and chief marketing officer.

The Daychaser has become the premium boat in the Barton & Gray’s fleet: members who want access to the Daychaser pay a higher level of annual dues — at least $80,000, in addition to a $20,000 initiation fee. “The Daychaser is very much a competitive advantage for us,” Gray said.

Barton & Gray recently signed a contract for its 16th Daychaser boat; three others have been sold to individual owners.

In 2023, Boston Boatworks announced a new boat that would be the first to bear its name: the Boston Boatworks Offshore Express Cruiser. Three are in various stages of production; a fourth is slated to get started next month.

The first customer in line is Ed Kaye, chief executive of a Bedford biotech company, Stoke Therapeutics. Kaye, who describes himself as “a sailor at heart,” expects to take delivery of the 50-foot craft with twin diesel engines later this year. The base price for that boat, the first model in the company’s Offshore Express Cruiser line, dubbed the BB44, is $2.85 million.

“The design appeals to sailors who are really focused on well-made and functional boats — not just pretty, fast boats,” Kaye said. He also likes the idea of “having a local group of people build something of quality — something that you’ll be proud of.”

Despite a COVID-fueled surge in recent years, sales of boats longer than 35 feet in recent years fell 9 percent in the first four months of this year, according to the National Marine Manufacturers Association. Boston Boatworks has reduced its workforce about 30 percent from its peak of 140 in 2019.

The company is still putting a dozen or so new boats into the water each year. The latest: the Appy, the electric ferry bound for service on Lake Winnipesaukee.

Smith, 66, said he plans to stick around his company as long as he can be useful. Boston Boatworks, he added, has never been about making boats at the lowest possible price, or at the fastest possible rate.

“We want to build the best,” he says. “There has always been an understanding that knowledgeable owners understand the value of what we do — and there’s a limited market of those.”

This story has been updated to correct the spelling of Lake Winnipesaukee.

Boats under construction at Boston Boatworks in Charlestown.

NT government says it intends to 'dispose of' historic Hobart-built Huon pine WWII warship

HDML 1321 in Hobart

A historic Hobart-built warship is set to be "disposed of" by the Northern Territory government because it is in the way of construction.

The Huon pine vessel, once used by commandos to go behind enemy lines during World War Two, has been rotting away in the middle of a major construction site despite aspirations to save it.

What's next?

A group of maritime enthusiasts has proposed moving the vessel 150 metres to another site, but says it needs more time.

A historic Hobart-built warship that took commandos behind enemy lines in World War Two is set to be "disposed of" by the Northern Territory government today if it is not moved from a construction site.

The 80 foot (24-metre) Huon pine patrol boat HDML 1321 later known as Rushcutter has been sitting on a cradle in a commercial shipyard since 2018.

The shipyard is being developed into northern Australia's largest ship lift.

A letter from the NT government's Infrastructure and Planning Logistics Department, seen by the ABC, said the continued presence of the vessel was a "significant hindrance" to the ongoing construction project.

"Therefore, we intend to dispose of the vessel on or after 10 July 2024, if it remains uncollected and/or no acceptable or satisfactory instructions for its delivery are provided," the letter said.

A boat in poor condition on a specially made cradle in a construction site

The letter said the group that owns the vessel, Save Motor Launch 1321, were notified in May of the urgent need to remove the boat.

"Despite the critical nature of this request and the potential impact of the vessel on construction activities, no response was received from the Association."

Robert Welfare, from Save Motor Launch 1321, said the group had not been granted access to the land the boat sits on because it is owned by a private company.

"There's a great deal of interest in Tasmania to bring this vessel back to where it was built and restore it," he said.

"Pursuant to that idea, it would be a travesty to dispose of it.

"I haven't been able to clarify how they will dispose of this vessel."

Elite WWII boat sinks off Darwin

Mr Welfare has proposed moving the boat to a common site 150 metres away, but that option would not be organised by today.

"We need a grace period, some time to organise these things," he said.

He said the boat would not be able to be moved by road because of its length, and would require a crane and low loader to move it to a suitable location near the water.

HDML 1321 — the letters stand for Harbour Defence Motor Launch — was used by Australia's elite Z Special Unit during WWII .

It was built in Hobart by Purdon and Featherstone in 1943 and was the first of nine patrol boats built in Australia for the Navy in WWII.

HDML 1321

Its most notorious operation was in 1945, when eight commandos used the vessel to go behind enemy lines in Papua New Guinea as part of Operation Copper.

It later became a training vessel before going into private ownership and in 2016 it sunk off Darwin and spent two years underwater.

A small group of volunteers who formed the Save Motor Launch 1321 group purchased the boat from its former owner for $2, and tried to recover it.

In 2018, it was finally pulled out of Darwin Harbour after a mammoth effort, and has since been sitting in a purpose-built cradle on the site of the $400 million ship lift development.

Earlier this year Save Motor Launch 1321 merged with a group of passionate maritime enthusiasts including two Tasmanians to come up with a plan to save the boat from its slow death rotting away near East Arm wharf.

There were aspirations to try and return the vessel to Tasmania where it could be restored.

The vessel Rushcutter on a specially made cradle in the middle of a construction site

The group was hoping the Navy could deliver it to Tasmania using HMAS Choules, as it did for historic vessel Mistral II.

That option was ruled out by Defence Minister Richard Marles.

In a letter to Save Motor Launch 1321 he said HMAS Choules was not transiting from Darwin to Hobart over the next 12 months.

"I am also advised that Defence does not retain the specialist recovery capabilities necessary to safely transport the vessel to Tasmania," the letter said.

"I understand this may not be the outcome you were hoping for and wish you all the best for your endeavour to relocate the vessel for specialist restoration."

a large old boat sits in a construction site

Darwin boat captain and marine pilot Ian Brokenshire said he was disappointed by the response.

"It has a history that is worthy and interesting to the public if they get to know about it," he said.

"It's in invaluable heritage item for Australia.

"It shouldn't just be a small organisation in Darwin trying to save this vessel, it should be the Australian government looking after the heritage of their military history."

Mr Brokenshire said the vessel was "sacred" to a lot of military people.

"It saved many lives and was involved in conflicts that were invaluable in Australia's success in WWII," he said.

"It deserves being recognised for what it gave this country."

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Moody’s and Microsoft develop enhanced risk, data, analytics, research and collaboration solutions powered by Generative AI

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Strategic partnership for next-gen solutions built on Microsoft Azure OpenAI Service, Microsoft Fabric, and Microsoft Teams and Moody’s proprietary data to empower financial services, capital markets, and more

Moody's and Microsoft logos

NEW YORK and REDMOND, Wash. — June 2 9, 2023   —  Moody’s Corporation (NYSE:MCO) and Microsoft (NASDAQ: MSFT) today announced a new strategic partnership to deliver next-generation data, analytics, research, collaboration and risk solutions for financial services and global knowledge workers. Built on a combination of Moody’s robust data and analytical capabilities and the power and scale of Microsoft Azure OpenAI Service, the partnership creates innovative offerings that enhance insights into corporate intelligence and risk assessment, powered by Microsoft AI and anchored by Moody’s proprietary data, analytics, and research.

Strategic Partnership Highlights

  • Microsoft and Moody’s are co-creating new products and services for research and risk assessment, built on Azure OpenAI Service for enhanced data and risk management.
  • “Moody’s CoPilot,” an internal copilot tool, is now deployed to Moody’s 14,000 global employees, and will combine Moody’s proprietary data, analytics and research with the latest large language models (LLMs) and Microsoft’s world-class generative AI technology to drive firm-wide innovation and enhance employee productivity in a safe and secure digital sandbox.
  • Moody’s is adopting Microsoft Teams to provide a new platform for its knowledge workers and customers that will enhance collaboration, productivity, and communication, while maintaining the highest compliance standards.
  • For internal use and co-innovations, Microsoft is leveraging Moody’s broad range of solutions, including Moody’s Orbis database – one of the world’s most powerful databases on companies – with applications that include third-party reference data, counterparty risk assessment, and supply chain management.
  • Microsoft and Moody’s will collaborate on the opportunity to deliver data to their shared customers through Microsoft Fabric , a new analytics platform for end-to-end data management.
  • Moody’s commits to using Microsoft’s Azure cloud platform to power its growing suite of generative AI capabilities and cloud-based applications.

Rob Fauber, president and chief executive officer of Moody’s Corporation, said, “Generative AI represents a once-in-a-generation opportunity to enhance how companies navigate the ever-evolving world of exponential risk . By combining Microsoft’s cutting-edge AI capabilities with our proprietary data, research and analytics, Moody’s is positioned to lead the next generation of risk analysis, helping our customers make better decisions by unlocking deeper, more integrated, and unmatched perspectives on risk. We have activated our 14,000 global employees to drive unprecedented experimentation and ignite new innovations across our suite of products and solutions.  We are excited to partner with Microsoft to set the standard for how generative AI will pioneer new advancements across our industry.”

Unlocking Advancements in Integrated Risk Analysis

A new copilot tool for customers, “Moody’s Research Assistant” will unlock the full potential of Moody’s resources and solutions to provide customers with a multifaceted view of risk. Built on Microsoft Azure OpenAI Service and available through multiple channels, including Microsoft Teams, Moody’s Research Assistant will quickly compile and summarize complex information from multiple data sources, all in a safe and secure environment that protects private and proprietary information. Among its many anticipated uses will be the ability to generate custom, detailed analyses of a company or sector by seamlessly combining data from across multiple dimensions – such as firmographic data, credit indicators, economic forecasts, and risk and reputational profiles – to provide fast, contextual and informative answers based on the integration of expansive LLMs and Moody’s industry-leading data, analytics and research.

Bill Borden, corporate vice president of worldwide financial services at Microsoft said, “Our partnership will bring together world-class insights from Moody’s with the capabilities, trust and breadth of Microsoft Cloud — including Azure OpenAI Service, Fabric and Teams — to enable next-gen solutions that will unlock powerful business intelligence and transform productivity and collaboration. We look forward to the new opportunities and value this will bring to employees and firms across banking, capital markets and insurance as well as those in other industries such as manufacturing, telecommunications, transportation and utilities.”

Enhancing Moody’s Collaboration and Productivity through Microsoft Teams

Additionally, through the partnership, Moody’s will leverage Microsoft Teams to create a new collaboration, productivity and communication platform for its knowledge workers and customers. With the integration of Moody’s copilot tools, Teams will automate and streamline manual workflows, provide more efficient access to data and content, and synthesize and summarize information from across multiple data sets, resulting in better insights, improved productivity and compliance, and enhanced employee and customer experiences.

Collaborating to Enhance the New Microsoft Fabric

Microsoft and Moody’s will collaborate on the opportunity to deliver data to their shared customers through Microsoft Fabric, a new end-to-end data analytics platform. Microsoft Fabric includes technologies like Azure Synapse Analytics, Azure Data Factory, and Power BI in a single unified product, allowing data engineers opportunity to easily connect and curate data from multiple sources, eliminating sprawl, while better governing data across the entire organization.

ABOUT MOODY’S CORPORATION

Moody’s (NYSE: MCO) is a global integrated risk assessment firm that empowers organizations to make better decisions. Its data, analytical solutions and insights help decision-makers identify opportunities and manage the risks of doing business with others. We believe that greater transparency, more informed decisions, and fair access to information open the door to shared progress. With approximately 14,000 employees in more than 40 countries, Moody’s combines international presence with local expertise and over a century of experience in financial markets.

ABOUT MICROSOFT

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @Microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

“SAFE HARBOR” STATEMENT UNDER THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995

Certain statements contained in this release are forward-looking statements and are based on future expectations, plans and prospects for Moody’s business and operations that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Such statements involve estimates, projections, goals, forecasts, assumptions and uncertainties that could cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those contemplated, expressed, projected, anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements. Stockholders and investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements and other information in this release are made as of the date hereof, and Moody’s undertakes no obligation (nor does it intend) to publicly supplement, update or revise such statements on a going-forward basis, whether as a result of subsequent developments, changed expectations or otherwise, except as required by applicable law or regulation. In connection with the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Moody’s is identifying certain factors that could cause actual results to differ, perhaps materially, from those indicated by these forward-looking statements. Those factors, risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to: the impact of current economic conditions, including capital market disruptions, inflation and related monetary policy actions by governments in response to inflation, on worldwide credit markets and on economic activity, including on the volume of mergers and acquisitions, and their effects on the volume of debt and other securities issued in domestic and/or global capital markets; the uncertain effectiveness and possible collateral consequences of U.S. and foreign government initiatives and monetary policy to respond to the current economic climate, including instability of financial institutions, credit quality concerns, and other potential impacts of volatility in financial and credit markets; the global impact of the Russia – Ukraine military conflict on volatility in world financial markets, on general economic conditions and GDP in the U.S. and worldwide, on global relations and on the Company’s own operations and personnel; other matters that could affect the volume of debt and other securities issued in domestic and/or global capital markets, including regulation, increased utilization of technologies that have the potential to intensify competition and accelerate disruption and disintermediation in the financial services industry, as well as the number of issuances of securities without ratings or securities which are rated or evaluated by non-traditional parties; the level of merger and acquisition activity in the U.S. and abroad; the uncertain effectiveness and possible collateral consequences of U.S. and foreign government actions affecting credit markets, international trade and economic policy, including those related to tariffs, tax agreements and trade barriers; the impact of MIS’s withdrawal of its credit ratings on countries or entities within countries and of Moody’s no longer conducting commercial operations in countries where political instability warrants such action; concerns in the marketplace affecting our credibility or otherwise affecting market perceptions of the integrity or utility of independent credit agency ratings; the introduction of competing products or technologies by other companies; pricing pressure from competitors and/or customers; the level of success of new product development and global expansion; the impact of regulation as an NRSRO, the potential for new U.S., state and local legislation and regulations; the potential for increased competition and regulation in the EU and other foreign jurisdictions; exposure to litigation related to our rating opinions, as well as any other litigation, government and regulatory proceedings, investigations and inquiries to which Moody’s may be subject from time to time; provisions in U.S. legislation modifying the pleading standards and EU regulations modifying the liability standards applicable to credit rating agencies in a manner adverse to credit rating agencies; provisions of EU regulations imposing additional procedural and substantive requirements on the pricing of services and the expansion of supervisory remit to include non-EU ratings used for regulatory purposes; uncertainty regarding the future relationship between the U.S. and China; the possible loss of key employees and the impact of the global labor environment; failures or malfunctions of our operations and infrastructure; any vulnerabilities to cyber threats or other cybersecurity concerns; the timing and effectiveness of our restructuring programs, such as the 2022 – 2023 Geolocation Restructuring Program; currency and foreign exchange volatility; the outcome of any review by controlling tax authorities of Moody’s global tax planning initiatives; exposure to potential criminal sanctions or civil remedies if Moody’s fails to comply with foreign and U.S. laws and regulations that are applicable in the jurisdictions in which Moody’s operates, including data protection and privacy laws, sanctions laws, anti-corruption laws, and local laws prohibiting corrupt payments to government officials; the impact of mergers, acquisitions, such as our acquisition of RMS, or other business combinations and the ability of Moody’s to successfully integrate acquired businesses; the level of future cash flows; the levels of capital investments; and a decline in the demand for credit risk management tools by financial institutions. These factors, risks and uncertainties as well as other risks and uncertainties that could cause Moody’s actual results to differ materially from those contemplated, expressed, projected, anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements are described in greater detail under “Risk Factors” in Part I, Item 1A of Moody’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2022, and in other filings made by the Company from time to time with the SEC or in materials incorporated herein or therein. Stockholders and investors are cautioned that the occurrence of any of these factors, risks and uncertainties may cause the Company’s actual results to differ materially from those contemplated, expressed, projected, anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements, which could have a material and adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition. New factors may emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for the Company to predict new factors, nor can the Company assess the potential effect of any new factors on it. Forward-looking and other statements in this document may also address our corporate responsibility progress, plans, and goals (including sustainability and environmental matters), and the inclusion of such statements is not an indication that these contents are necessarily material to investors or required to be disclosed in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, historical, current, and forward-looking sustainability-related statements may be based on standards for measuring progress that are still developing, internal controls and processes that continue to evolve, and assumptions that are subject to change in the future.

For more information:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777, [email protected] Moody’s Investor Relations, Shivani Kak, (212) 553, 0298, [email protected] Moody’s Communications, Michael Adler, (212) 553-4667, [email protected]

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Inside the last company building boats in Boston

Boats under construction at Boston Boatworks in Charlestown.

Whenever you drive the Tobin Bridge, just before you leave Charlestown, you’re passing over the last company making boats in Boston.

Along the Mystic River, with several of the Tobin’s trestles planted in the parking lot, Boston Boatworks is continuing a tradition that reaches back centuries. Boston has built boats big and small, from the USS Constitution constructed in the North End, to the clipper ships of Donald McKay’s shipyard in East Boston, to the “unsinkable” Boston Whaler, designed in Braintree.

Walk into Boston Boatworks, and you’re greeted by the smell of the special glue the company uses to make the carbon fiber hulls of its watercraft. Go a little further, and you’ll encounter a half-dozen boats in various stages of construction — including an electric ferry for a popular campground on Three Mile Island in Lake Winnipesaukee.

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Boston Boatworks started life in 1995, as a partnership between Scott Smith, Mark Lindsay, and Geoff Berger. (Lindsay, a renowned designer of sailboats, died in 2019, and Berger is now CEO of Hinckley Yachts, a Rhode Island manufacturer.) The company’s original home was East Boston, in the former Bethlehem Atlantic Works shipyard, which repaired ships for the Navy and Coast Guard.

Burnham Kenyon (in boat) spoke with Scott Smith and Mark Lindsay at the stern of a boat under construction at Boston Boatworks in East Boston in 1997.

It outgrew its space there and moved in 2014 to a three-story building with offices on the top, a factory floor, and massive roll-up doors at both ends. One of those roll-up doors faces the Mystic, where docks and a lift allow the company to get boats in and out of the water.

Boston Boatworks first made custom racing sailboats, but eventually concluded that that market was too small. But the company realized that lightweight materials and designs used to make sailboats faster had not penetrated the world of powerboats.

With powerboats, Smith explained, “you can overcome a lot of design deficiencies just by adding more horsepower. Our approach was to take weight out of the boat, use smaller engines — which have less fuel consumption — and materials that don’t fatigue as the boat ages.”

Rather than traditional fiberglass, Boston Boatworks chose to use more expensive carbon fiber — which is lighter, stiffer, and tougher — and borrowed manufacturing techniques from aircraft production, which also uses the material. If you’ve seen the Encore Casino’s water shuttles — built at a cost of about $1 million each — you’ve seen their work.

In the early 2000s, Boston Boatworks was approached by a North Carolina company, MJM Yachts, to build a line of ocean-going yachts; MJM wanted to marry Boston Boatworks’ manufacturing expertise with a sleek, low-slung design from Doug Zurn, a naval architect in Marblehead.

Boston Boatworks employees at work in a hull on the company's factory floor in Charlestown.

MJM quickly became Boston Boatworks’ largest customer. But in 2019, Boston Boatworks’ relationship with MJM abruptly ended when MJM decided to set up its own factory in North Carolina, citing lower labor and other costs.

That forced Boston Boatworks to scramble. One lifeline came from a $20 million contract to build 10 boats for the Barton & Gray Mariner’s Club, a New Hampshire company that is like Zipcar for the yachting set. Members can reserve a boat and captain in places such as Nantucket, East Hampton, or Boca Raton.

That deal let Barton & Gray design a boat especially for its members, who go out for the day rather than on overnight trips. What had been a sleeping cabin in the Hinckley yachts the club offers became an outdoor space in the bow. The kitchen moved upstairs so that people could more easily gather around the food.

The 48-foot boat, called the Daychaster, is longer, wider, and larger than the Hinckleys, but it is 15 to 20 percent more fuel efficient because of the materials used by Boston Boatworks, said Douglas Gray, Barton & Gray’s cofounder and chief marketing officer.

The Daychaser has become the premium boat in the Barton & Gray’s fleet: members who want access to the Daychaser pay a higher level of annual dues — at least $80,000, in addition to a $20,000 initiation fee. “The Daychaser is very much a competitive advantage for us,” Gray said.

Barton & Gray recently signed a contract for its 16th Daychaser boat; three others have been sold to individual owners.

where are moody yachts built

In 2023, Boston Boatworks announced a new boat that would be the first to bear its name: the Boston Boatworks Offshore Express Cruiser. Three are in various stages of production; a fourth is slated to get started next month.

The first customer in line is Ed Kaye, chief executive of a Bedford biotech company, Stoke Therapeutics. Kaye, who describes himself as “a sailor at heart,” expects to take delivery of the 50-foot craft with twin diesel engines later this year. The base price for that boat, the first model in the company’s Offshore Express Cruiser line, dubbed the BB44, is $2.85 million.

“The design appeals to sailors who are really focused on well-made and functional boats — not just pretty, fast boats,” Kaye said. He also likes the idea of “having a local group of people build something of quality — something that you’ll be proud of.”

Despite a COVID-fueled surge in recent years, sales of boats longer than 35 feet in recent years fell 9 percent in the first four months of this year, according to the National Marine Manufacturers Association. Boston Boatworks has reduced its workforce about 30 percent from its peak of 140 in 2019.

The company is still putting a dozen or so new boats into the water each year. The latest: the Appy, the electric ferry bound for service on Lake Winnipesaukee.

Boston Boatworks CEO Scott Smith (right ) with COO Raphael Silva took their shoes off to step onto a new boat at the company's dock along the Mystic River.

Smith, 66, said he plans to stick around his company as long as he can be useful. Boston Boatworks, he added, has never been about making boats at the lowest possible price, or at the fastest possible rate.

“We want to build the best,” he says. “There has always been an understanding that knowledgeable owners understand the value of what we do — and there’s a limited market of those.”

This story has been updated to correct the spelling of Lake Winnipesaukee.

Scott Kirsner can be reached at [email protected] . Follow him @ScottKirsner .

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COMMENTS

  1. Moody Yachts

    Moody is an English brand of sailing yachts. It is originated in the former Moody shipyard in Swanwick that was founded in 1827 by John Moody. As of 2007, the brand belongs to German yacht builder HanseYachts AG, Greifswald .

  2. Our History

    Moody's story is deeply woven into the fabric of sailing history, holding the title of one of the oldest yacht-building brands in the world. John Moody, a skilled skipper, founded a repair yard in Swanwick, near Southampton, in 1827. Requests from colleagues poured in, and although initially specialised in servicing fishing boats, he also ...

  3. Moody Yachts (A. H. Moody & Sons)

    Though the company was founded in the mid-19th century, the first yacht was built in 1934. The Moody 33 by Angus Primrose in 1972 was first production yacht developed jointly between A.H. Moody & Son Ltd, Southampton and Princess Yachts International (Formerly Marine Projects). It was an immediate success and the MOODY brand was born. Moody has a long earned reputation among experienced ...

  4. Moody Yachts (A. H. Moody & Sons)

    Though the company was founded in the mid-19th century, the first yacht was built in 1934. The Moody 33 by Angus Primrose in 1972 was first production yacht developed jointly between A.H. Moody & Son Ltd, Southampton and Princess Yachts International (Formerly Marine Projects). It was an immediat...

  5. Moody 36 MkII: a centre-cockpit cruiser that's practical and fun

    Built at Marine Projects in Plymouth (now Princess Yachts), a total of 118 Moody 36 MkIIs were constructed to Lloyd's 100A1 yardstick. Hulls were laid up by hand, using mat and woven rovings with waterproof isophthalic resins.

  6. A Deep Dive into Moody Yachts

    When it comes to high-quality sailing yachts, Moody Yachts stands out as a beacon of excellence. With a rich history dating back to 1827, Moody Yachts has built a legacy of producing robust, reliable, and elegantly designed vessels. In this comprehensive guide, we delve into the world of Moody Yachts, focusing on popular models like the Moody 36 and Moody 35.

  7. Boat Review: Moody 45DS

    Moody Yachts were built in Swanwick, England, on the banks of the Hamble River from the middle of the 18th century into the early years of the 21st, and Bill Dixon has been designing Moody's cruising boats since 1981.

  8. Comfortable & Seaworthy Sailing Yachts

    One hundred and fifty years of experience, coupled with unmatched excellence in design and manufacturing. It is qualities like these that have made Moody one of the most illustrious names in the sailing yacht world. Over many generations, Moody has developed an exemplary boat building culture culminating in its current range of deck saloon yachts.

  9. Live aboard offshore luxury blue water sailing yachts

    In 1965, the Solar 40 became the first GRP yacht to be built by Moody. Cruising sailors were quick to praise its offshore long-distance sailing performance and high level of live aboard comfort.

  10. Moody S38: a good all-round family cruising boat

    Looking for a good all-round family cruising boat with a good turn of speed, there are plenty of strong contenders, including the Moody S38. An obvious sheer and high topsides make the Moody S38 a dry boat, while the beam carried aft boosts performance. Credit: Duncan Kent. This product is featured in: Island Packet 380: The best liveaboard ...

  11. Moody 29

    Moody 29 is a 29′ 6″ / 9 m monohull sailboat designed by Angus Primrose and built by Moody Yachts (A. H. Moody & Sons) between 1980 and 1983.

  12. Moody 45

    Moody 45. The acquisition a few years ago of British boatbuilder Moody Yachts by Germany s Hanse set the scene for an unlikely marriage. Moody was known for solid, staid cruising boats, built for comfort, not speed; Hanse s spectacular growth during the previous decade had been fuelled by an attractive line-up of fast cruisers that combined ...

  13. Moody 41 Aft Cockpit

    Moody Aft Cockpit 41. The Moody AC41 took traditional yacht-building into the modern era, combining a classic flat superstructure with comfortable handling and exclusive on-board luxury . The yacht has been designed for speedy yet comfortable cruising, but it is just as ideally equipped for marina life, short hops along the coast and long voyages.

  14. Moody overall quality?

    1. The structure is built to extremely high standards, second to none I think. The chain plates on my boat are bigger than the ones on a Swan 90 I spent some time on -- they must weigh 50 pounds each, and appear to have been stolen off a railroad bridge. These boats are fully stick built with no liner, no grid, etc.

  15. Moody 35

    The Moody 35 is a 34.5ft masthead sloop designed by Bill Dixon and built in fiberglass by Moody Yachts (A. H. Moody & Sons) between 1990 and 1996. Moody 35 detailed characteristics and performance ratios.

  16. The Moody 46 Sailboat

    The Moody 46, designed by Bill Dixon * and built by Moody Yachts between 1997 and 2001, is a well-appointed cruiser that offers plenty of space, performance and features for recreational sailors.

  17. The Moody 34 Sailboat

    The Moody 34 is a classic cruising sailboat that was designed by Bill Dixon and built by Moody Yachts in England. It features a centre cockpit, a fin keel, a masthead sloop rig, and a spacious interior with two cabins and a separate head. It's known for its solid construction, comfortable sailing performance, and generous storage space, and is a popular choice for long-distance cruising or ...

  18. Moody quality opinions

    All the Moody's referred to were/are built by Marine Projects in Plymouth to Bill Dixon designs from briefs drawn up by the Moody board (David and John, in practice) and the MP key personnel of David King and SImon Limb. Moody Marketing handle the sales in the UK, MP distribute the boats overseas.

  19. Moody 28

    Moody 28 is a 27′ 5″ / 8.4 m monohull sailboat designed by Bill Dixon and Angus Primrose and built by Moody Yachts (A. H. Moody & Sons) between 1985 and 1987.

  20. Four great centre cockpit Moody yachts

    A former giant of the British sailboat building industry (now a marque owned and built by Hanse ), from the early 1970s onwards Moody forged a reputation for producing quality family cruisers with spacious accommodation. The range was perceived as being a quality offering and found favour with those who were looking for a luxurious cruiser for weekend and holiday cruising, as well as live ...

  21. Moody Sailing Yachts

    Made for you. Since the beginning, Hanse has been breaking rules and setting trends in the sailing world. From 31 to 58 feet, you'll find the Hanse of your dreams combining extremely comfortable handling with impressive sailing dynamics. Made in Germany. And made with a passion for sailing and innovation.

  22. Inside the last company building boats in Boston

    Along the Mystic River, Boston Boatworks continues a tradition that reaches back centuries to the construction of the USS Constitution and the clipper ships built in Donald McKay's shipyard.

  23. NT government says it intends to 'dispose of' historic Hobart-built

    The Northern Territory government says it will "dispose of" a historic Huon pine warship used by the elite Z Special Group in World War Two. A group of enthusiasts is hoping to save the rotting ...

  24. Wooden boat built in the '60s lovingly restored

    A boat called the Thingabob is back in the water after being completely refurbished by a Nova Scotia company. It was originally built 58 years ago and launched again this week in Chester Basin, N.S.

  25. Our Philosophy

    Delve into the philosophy that powers Moody's iconic sailing yachts. Understand our commitment to seaworthiness, innovation, and unmatched comfort.

  26. Moody's and Microsoft develop enhanced risk, data, analytics, research

    Built on a combination of Moody's robust data and analytical capabilities and the power and scale of Microsoft Azure OpenAI Service, the partnership creates innovative offerings that enhance insights into corporate intelligence and risk assessment, powered by Microsoft AI and anchored by Moody's proprietary data, analytics, and research. ...

  27. Boston Boatworks is the last company building boats in Boston

    Along the Mystic River, Boston Boatworks continues a tradition that reaches back centuries to the construction of the USS Constitution and the clipper ships built in Donald McKay's shipyard.

  28. Moody Sailing Yachts

    Moody yachts are synonymous with sophisticated luxury on the high seas. Whether you prefer the globally unique deck saloon concept or the revived classic sailing tradition of the Aft Cockpit design. All Moody boats are easy to sail, uncompromisingly seaworthy, and built to last, so much so that you will want to embark on voyage after voyage. Find your perfect blue water sailing yacht!