DORIS HMCo#625

Doris restoration project.

snediker yacht restoration

Original launch date May 10, 1905

Loa 77’6″ ~ lwl 56′ 7″.

yacht, DORIS

Languishing in a boat yard in New London CT for 30 years, DORIS, the largest all-wood sailing vessel built by Herreshoff Manufacturing Co in 1905, was scheduled to be scrapped at the end of August 2013.  Given a one-year lease on life by the generous collaboration of a good friend and Snediker Yacht Restoration of Pawcatuck, a search for a new owner was spearheaded. Now, thanks to an enthusiastic client, DORIS has been saved.

The complete restoration of DORIS will be the largest ever undertaken by Snediker Yacht Restoration. This website will follow the progress as she’s returned to her original specifications, featuring the latest information and pictures, in addition, will share her history as its discovered through past owners and maritime archives.

Beating the Great Gloriana

snediker yacht restoration

ON FINE RUN

DORIS Heads Three Sloops Into the Isles of Shoals

Boston Daily Globe; July 10, 1905, pg 10

The best racing of the day was between the three Herreshoff sloops, the DORIS, WASP and GLORIANA. The first named, with 10 feet greater waterline length, found her smaller but leaner rivals hard to shake off. They followed hard in her wake for half the course, the WASP often at her sternboard.

All the way from Thatchers to the finish their skippers were on edge using every means their knowledge suggested to get greater speed out of their boats.  It seemed at times as if one would take the lead clean, but again the boats fell in to a bunch bowling along in close order, with none gaining.

DORIS Holds Spinnaker.

As they neared the finish they, like the schooners, were obliged to drop their spinnakers. The DORIS held on to hers and made good by it.

The breeze was nor freshening a bit, and hauling still more westerly, off the land. This gave a lively swing to the finish of the sloops.

The DORIS led them home, with a cable’s length to spare. She carried her spinnaker to the finish, flowed well forward.  The GLORIANA was second over, 75 seconds behind the DORIS. The WASP was a cable’s length behind the Gloriana.  She towed a tender throughout the run, which did not improve her going.  The DORIS probably won, as she allows little, if anything, to the other two.

Restoration Gallery

Restoration Slide Show

  • 0 Shopping Cart $ 0.00 -->

Ink Publications

Snediker Yacht: Rescuing a Large Lady – Takes a lot of Work…

By Carolyn Battista / Photos by A. Vincent Scarano, Heather Holloway, MIT Museum &  Mystic Seaport Museum

For a long time, she was a large lady in dire distress. Now, to her admirers’ relief, she has arrived at just the right place.

CF-30-099

Doris in her original splendor. Photo courtesy MIT

S he would be Doris, a 78-foot sailing yacht built in 1905, with hull #625, by the Herreshoff Manufacturing Company in Bristol, Rhode Island. She’s the largest all-wooden boat ever built by the famed company, but a few years ago she seemed about to get scrapped, after decades of damage and neglect. At last she was rescued and brought to Snediker Yacht Restoration, an outfit in Pawcatuck, Connecticut, that’s known for meticulous care and skill in building, maintaining, and restoring boats, mostly wooden ones.

“Doris is an incredibly lucky girl. Even through neglect, people made sure she didn’t get cut up,” said Dave Snediker, whose boat shop has tackled everything from building a dory like Henry David Thoreau’s, to restoring a 1960’s “vaporetto,” a Venetian water taxi. Doris will become the shop’s largest project ever. Work to rebuild her from the inside out using original plans, proper materials, and a combination of traditional and modern methods, is expected to take about five years. The shop has established a website, Doris1905.com, to tell Doris’s history, show photos old and new, and report progress. Meanwhile, day to day, the shop keeps up with its other varied tasks.

Doris was designed by Nathanael G. Herreshoff  for S. Reed Anthony, an investment banker who paid $18,000 for her. She was the first boat designed and built under the Universal Rule which, Dave said, “rewarded a more voluminous hull. It really changed the way boats looked.” Doris soon turned heads as she defeated Gloriana, a prize-winning 1899 Herreshoff  boat of “old-rule” design, in a race series off Marblehead, Massachusetts.

Over the years Doris had several owners, several names (Astarte, Huntress, Vayu, Doris again) and many fine hours on the water; but she came upon hard times. In the late 1970’s, she ran aground. Her hull got badly damaged; and there was even talk of just packing her with hay, then setting her afire. Over the years there were noble efforts to fix, to restore, but all faltered.

1958_1682_814_DORIS_MSM

Doris Image courtesy: Mystic Seaport Museum

Early photos on the Doris website show a resplendent vessel; later ones include a group poignantly titled, “The Beautiful Decline of Vayu.” Eventually poor Doris spent more than 30 years just sitting, deteriorating, at Crocker’s Boatyard in New London. By 2013, Crocker’s was ready to scrap her, but waited while help was found–an anonymous Snediker’s client who stepped forward to buy Doris and fund her restoration. “He wants to stay in the background,” Dave said. “He’s a great guy.”

In September 2015, Doris traveled by truck-and-trailer with escort vehicles flashing their lights, down busy city streets, along I-95, and across the Gold Star Bridge to Snediker’s.  There Dave has the original construction profile for Doris (from Herreshoff papers at MIT) on one office wall, and one of her cast-iron malleable hanging knees on another. “We’ll start the restoration of Doris pretty much the way she was built,” Dave said. “We just got a truck load of oak for frames and deck beams….”

Because work on Doris will require more room than the boat shop has, Snediker’s is leasing an old sail loft building nearby. There, lofting—laying down plans for the hull—has already been completed. Doris has been resting on supports outside the boat shop, but she’s headed for another road trip—this one to the sail loft building with its nice indoor space, 90 feet long.

Dave launched the boat shop with Bill Taylor (who has since retired) more than 30 years ago, but he has worked with wood and with boats since he was a kid. “My dad always had cranky old wooden boats we worked on with him,” he said. The family lived on Long Island and sailed the local waters. “I loved it,” he said. He also liked a PBS woodworking show. “That’s so cool!” he thought, even of wooden buckets on the show. The family moved to Mystic when he was 14, and he soon signed up for a boat building course with the legendary John Gardner at Mystic Seaport.  In coming years he would help his brother Quentin build the Mystic Clipper (replica of a 19th-century Baltimore clipper), work as a shipwright at the Seaport, and do many building and carpentry projects. He noted that he and Taylor took on assorted jobs at first, but soon gravitated to what they especially favored—“all boats.”

Snediker’s has worked on boats of all sorts and sizes. In 2007, they constructed a close-as-possible replica of Musketaquid, the boat that Henry David Thoreau built with his brother John. Henry wrote about the boat and their 1839 trip in it in his first book, “A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers.” He described the boat as 15 feet long, 3 ½ feet wide, “in a form like a fisherman’s dory.” Dave said, “It was a fun project. We harvested knees in the woods, which is what I think Thoreau would have done.” The new Musketaquid was exhibited at the Concord Museum in Concord, Mass.

Another project was the restoration of Intermezzo, the vaporetto (or “motoscafi”) that had plied Venetian waterways. Now Intermezzo has among other improvements, a new engine, a new bottom, and restored chrome. “She flies,” Dave said.

This spring Snediker’s restored the 1950’s Arion, the first American fiberglass auxiliary sailing yacht. It was designed by Sidney Herreshoff, Nathanael’s son, who used traditional methods (such as starting with a half-hull model) along with the new-fangled fiberglass. “It’s a very significant boat,” Snediker said, adding that it left the boat shop in splendid shape. “We really tricked her out,” he said. “We used lots of  teak; she’s pretty fancy.”

Recently completed was the restoration of The Kid, a 21-foot 1901 raceabout designed by BB Crowninshield for a famed yachtsman, Oliver Harriman. She belonged for many years to the late Clifford D. Mallory, a longtime supporter and trustee of Mystic Seaport, who named her Cliphora and raced her on Long Island Sound. Snediker’s also builds boats, including lots of little Herreshoff models that have been shipped all over, from the Mediterranean to New Zealand. Current projects include building a 97-foot mast for a Sparkman & Stephens yawl and doing little extra tasks (like varnishing the binoculars rack) on Arion, which gets attention even after leaving the shop.

As the boat shop crew digs into the Doris project, Snediker’s will also engage cabinetmakers, metal fabricators, and other contractors for some jobs. “There’s a network of people who do such great work, so many little great machine shops,” Dave said. He appreciates the small operations, often run by old-timers with decades of experience, that take on painstaking projects that bigger, more modern places don’t want.  New work will have to be done around original work. “It’s boatbuilding with the old boat in the way,” he said. Always, the aim will be to stay true to Doris—the 1905 Herreshoff Doris.

Snediker’s welcomes more information, more photos, and even original components that will aid the restoration.  All were pleased when a truck pulled up with such items as paneling and bunk boards that answered some of their questions about detailing. Joel Plessala, of the boatshop crew, said, “Stuff comes out of the woodwork.  We have located the binnacle and the wheel. There are other things out there….”

Dave noted that many folks in southeastern Connecticut know Doris, remember seeing her on the water and never wanted to see her scrapped. “So many people cared about her,”he said. “It’s been a huge effort by a lot of people to get her this far.” He expects that when the restoration is completed, Doris will sail New England waters and maybe beyond. “The Mediterranean…,” he mused, “that’s where she should be seen!”

For more information and photos, visit: doris1905.com and snedikeryacht.com .

HH.5

Original drawings courtesy: MIT

Share this entry

  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Google+
  • Share on Pinterest
  • Share on Linkedin
  • Share on Tumblr
  • Share on Vk
  • Share on Reddit
  • Share by Mail

Dirt Floor Recording & Production: Catching up with Eric Lichter

  • A Hundred Miles From Shore

snediker yacht restoration

  • Mollusk Masters Of Mystic: Part Two

snediker yacht restoration

Dave Gleason - Underwater In Southern New England

snediker yacht restoration

Little Pub - Food, Fun, & Familiarity

snediker yacht restoration

Counter Weight Brewing Company - A Delicate Balance

snediker yacht restoration

Wiffle Ball Incorporated - Saving Windows Since 1953

snediker yacht restoration

Mystic Oysters - Mollusk Masters of Connecticut Part One:

snediker yacht restoration

Saving 4-Legged Lives Every Day - How Waggle is Reducing “Economic Euthanasia”

snediker yacht restoration

email: [email protected]

Recent Posts

  • Dirt Floor Recording & Production: Catching up with Eric Lichter
  • Dave Gleason – Underwater In Southern New England

RECENT STORIES

snediker yacht restoration

August 2016
M T W T F S S
1234567
891011121314
161718192021
22232425262728
31  

EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS

Advertising contacts.

Bob Houde - Advertising Director [email protected]

Cheryl Powell - Saybrook/Clinton [email protected]

Rona Mann - Clinton/Rhode Island [email protected]

Jacqueline Hornish - Litchfield County [email protected]

Richard Malinsky - Shoreline [email protected]

snediker yacht restoration

A Herreshoff yacht on its way to new life

Relic from famed bristol boat builder to emerge restored.

The sailing yacht Doris, in storage since the 1970's in New London, begins its journey to Stonington, Conn., for restoration Tuesday. It was built in Bristol, by the Herreshoff Manufacturing Co. The Day/Sean D. Elliot

NEW LONDON, Conn. — It's not often you get to see a magnificent, historic yacht, one listed on the National Register of Historic Places, cruising down Interstate 95, at times taking up the entire northbound band of the highway.

But that was the unusual sight some motorists were treated to shortly after noon on Tuesday, as the 78-foot, 1905 Doris, the largest surviving wooden boat from the renowned Herreshoff Manufacturing Co. of Bristol, R.I., made her way by trailer from New London to Stonington.

The remarkable move, which included a team of escort trucks with flashing lights, is the beginning of a new restoration attempt, a project that has started but failed several times under different owners during the some 30 years the boat has been out of the water.

This one, under the direction of the respected Taylor & Snediker Yacht Restoration company of Pawcatuck, appears likely to succeed.

Not only will it eventually put a famous American racing yacht back in the water, but it will be a little economic development engine here.

David Snediker said his firm will increase the number of employees from 8 to 12 or so, and probably as many as 9 of them will be working full time for the next five years on Doris.

The firm also will employ dozens of subcontractors, like metal fabricators and cabinetmakers, to rebuild the yacht to museum-quality standards.

The boat was moved Tuesday to the company's location on Mechanic Street in Pawcatuck, where the work will begin.

But since it is not feasible to build a new building there that can accommodate the boat, the firm eventually will move to a new location, with a new building, and Doris will go along.

The yacht's new owner, who wishes to remain anonymous, is a customer of Taylor & Snediker, who was intrigued after learning that the abandoned and badly deteriorating Doris was probably going to be destroyed.

Snediker credits the owners of Crocker's Boatyard of New London as the heroes of the story of saving Doris. They kept the boat for years, even though tens of thousands of dollars of yard storage fees went unpaid for so long.

The latest effort to save her began when Crocker's notified people at Mystic Seaport that they were going to finally have to destroy the boat, which lost its deck and interior in one of the restoration attempts, unless someone would step forward.

Snediker, who is the brother of Quentin Snediker, director of the shipyard at Mystic Seaport, said he originally crafted a plan to at least buy the boat some more time, and then his customer grew more interested.

The customer eventually agreed to buy it from Crocker's, for what Snediker described as a very modest amount. A marine lawyer also had to be hired to clear the title, since so many liens had been placed on it by creditors over the years.

The boat, once it is restored, will retain its original U.S. Coast Guard documentation number from 1905, the one issued to S. Reed Anthony, a founding partner of the investment banking firm Tucker Anthony & Co.

Anthony originally paid Herreshoff Manufacturing $18,000 to build the boat, the first significant vessel of its kind built under more modern racing measuring rules that allowed boats to have more volume.

In reality, not much of the original boat will remain in the new version, although some equipment that was retained by one of the former owners who tried to restore it will be used.

The work, Snediker said, will be done in a way to ensure that the project is considered a restoration and not a replication. The building of a new structure will occur within the old one.

The boatbuilders at Taylor & Snediker joke that it's boatbuilding in which the old boat actually gets in the way.

Indeed, the restoration of Doris will be more complicated and costly than a replication, Snediker said.

In the end, it is sure to be true to the intentions of famed yacht designer Nathanael Greene Herreshoff. They have copies of hundreds of pages of the original plans for Doris from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which has his papers.

Someone who once found pieces of the interior from Doris, rescued from a trash bin, also has come forward to donate them to the project.

And on Tuesday, a gaggle of wooden boat enthusiasts gathered to greet Doris as she arrived in Pawcatuck.

She is charmed, Snediker said, to have made it this far.

[email protected]

On Twitter: @DavidCollinsct

Open for Spring: Tues-Sat: 10-5pm, Sun: 12-5pm | Donate to the Museum

Herreshoff Marine Museum

Lecture: “The DORIS Restoration” by Dave Snediker

November 16, 2023 6:00 pm

Join us on Thursday, November 16 at 6:00 PM for a presentation with David Snediker of Snediker Yacht Restoration. David will discuss the story of DORIS, the 1905, 78’, Herreshoff yacht, that is being restored at Snediker Yacht Restoration. Built in Bristol, Rhode Island, in 1905, by the Herreshoff Manufacturing Co.,DORIS changed the course of American yachting and has been given National Historic Register recognition. The restoration is on course for completion in 2025.

Snediker Yacht Restoration builds, restores, and repairs classic wooden boats. They specialize in traditional construction and have been in the business for over thirty years. They have built an outstanding reputation for attention to quality and detail and have gained a deep understanding of what can go wrong in a wooden boat and how to fix it. Their small, conscientious crew represents about a century and a half of combined experience working on all types of boat projects. Snediker Yacht has worked on racing boats meant to be sailed hard and put away wet, museum pieces that will never see the water, and classic cruisers that are both comfortable and elegant. More importantly, they have built long-lasting relationships with their clients, their families, and the boats they love.

Languishing in a boat yard in New London CT for 30 years, DORIS, the largest all-wood sailing vessel built by Herreshoff Manufacturing Co in 1905, was scheduled to be scrapped at the end of August 2013. Given a one-year lease on life by the generous collaboration of a good friend and Snediker Yacht Restoration of Pawcatuck, a search for a new owner was spearheaded. Now, thanks to an enthusiastic client, DORIS has been saved.

The complete restoration of DORIS will be the largest ever undertaken by Snediker Yacht Restoration . This website will follow the progress as she’s returned to her original specifications, featuring the latest information and pictures, in addition, will share her history as its discovered through past owners and maritime archives.

November 16, 2023

In-Person Reception begins at 6 pm Lecture begins at 7 pm, Eastern

Purchase tickets below: Virtual Tickets: Members: $10, Non-Members: $15 In-Person Tickets: Members: $15, Non-Members: $20 Save $5. Support the Museum. Become a Member today .

ProBoat.com

Professional BoatBuilder Magazine

Arion celebrates her 70th anniversary.

By Dieter Loibner , May 12, 2021

snediker yacht restoration

Arion races upwind on Narragansett Bay. The world’s first auxiliary sailing yacht made of fiberglass turned 70.

She’s a slender double-ended ketch that kissed the water for the first time on May 15, 1951. Drawn by A. Sidney DeWolf Herreshoff, Arion measures 42 ‘ (12.8m) overall and 37 ‘ 11 “ (11.55m) on the waterline, with an 8 ‘ 1 “ (2.45m) beam, a 5 ‘ 6 “ draft (1.68m), a displacement of 10,500 lbs (4,757 kg) with nearly half, or 5,000 lbs (2,265 kg), as ballast, flying 562 sq ft (52.2m2) of canvas upwind. The boat was at the vanguard of a development that revolutionized boatbuilding and dramatically expanded the market of potential boat owners. Seven decades ago, fiberglass emerged as the “miracle material” that enabled cost-effective production with the use of tooling, despite Sidney’s brother, L. Francis Herreshoff, famously deriding it as “frozen snot.”

Commissioned by Verner Z. Reed, then the commodore of the Ida Lewis Yacht Club in Newport, Rhode Island, Arion emerged from the shed of The Anchorage in Warren, Rhode Island, where several hundred smaller fiberglass boats had been built from 1946 on. “Built of no-upkeep ‘Dyeresin,’ she’s the world’s largest one piece [sic] reinforced plastic yacht,” a magazine ad heralded the boat. “Smooth as an eel and strong as steel, won’t twist, work or leak. Her construction, prolonging life and GREATLY REDUCING THE COST OF YACHTING, makes her the Boat of the Future,” the ad continued.

Fiberglass Layup

At The Anchorage, personal protection was not yet mandatory for yard workers during hull layup.

Yachting magazine detailed the novel building technique: “The construction is interesting since there are no frames, longitudinal stringers or ‘backbone,’ rigidity being obtained by skin thickness and hull form. Her skin varies from ¼ “ [6mm] at the sheer to over 1 “ [25mm] at the keel pad.… Decks, cabin tops and watertight cockpit are of waterproof plywood covered with glass cloth and pigmented resin.”

Arion Rings in the Revolution

Her sweet lines and light weight made Arion a force on the race course. And builder W.J.H. Dyer, who’s also the resin’s name patron, was quoted in a local paper: “The hull is quite flexible, not brittle…it is easy and inexpensive to repair.” To say nothing about superior resistance to damage inflicted by marine growth and the lack of appeal to pests like termites or worms, which can wreak havoc on wooden hulls. Her many virtues should have assured Arion ’s commercial success, but that’s not how it panned out.

Damian McLaughlin

Boatbuilder Damian McLaughlin saved and restored Arion before relaunching her in 2001.

Even though Dyer’s predictions were spot-on and this vessel was a catalyst for a boatbuilding materials revolution that created a new industry and put millions of people on the water, Arion remained a unicorn. Eventually she fell on hard times as a derelict boat in a field, until she was rescued from a potential date with the chainsaw. Her savior was Massachusetts boatbuilder Damian McLaughlin , who made his name constructing oceangoing multihulls designed by the likes of Dick Newick, Chris White, and James Wharram, and also has a predilection for conventional monohull designs by Herres­hoff, Sparkman & Stephens, and Chuck Paine. Arion was just what McLaughlin had been looking for, “long, lean, light and low,” as he states in “The Story of Arion ,” posted on his website. In essence, he wanted a bigger version of L. Francis Herreshoff’s seminal canoe-bodied 28 ‘ (8.53 m) ketch Rozinante, a successful design that still enjoys a following today.

Cosmetically, Arion was a disaster after many years of neglect, but her structure was sound, without any noticeable delamination or excessive moisture in the fiberglass. McLaughlin bought her and started the rehab. Matthew Smith assisted with a lines plan, hydrostatic calculations, and drawings for a new rig. McLaughlin set to work, replacing interior, deck, deckhouse, keel, and aft cabin before relaunching her in Pocasset, Massachusetts, in June 2001, nearly 50 years to the day when Arion first tasted the brine.

“To me it was the resurrection of an antiquity, an archeological excavation, and the assembly of what I thought to be the perfect combination for sailing/cruising,” he explains on his website. “I have been ecstatic over the discoveries of the attributes of this vessel [that I] learned while rebuilding her, getting her tuned, and just sailing her.”

snediker yacht restoration

Sidney DeWolf Herreshoff’s drawings show Arion’s sensible arrangement and elegant proportions.

Arion is not a stripped-out camper, he explains, with hull and deck getting plenty of support from six full bulkheads, while floor timbers support the keel. In terms of creature comforts, he lists galley, stove, sink and refrigerator, small settee, enclosed head, two single and two double berths in two separate cabins, and 14 opening ports, inspired by L. Francis Herreshoff’s Goldenball . The boat even has plenty of standing headroom, as long as one stays on deck. “It’s a sailboat, not a kitchen and a bathroom you can take sailing,” McLaughlin quipped, because to him, good boats must move well. Sailing the boat reefed down with his wife, he claims the knotmeter hit 13.9. “She is very fast, with an easy motion; she sails herself with almost no input on the tiller, and she maneuvers inside the harbor like a 15 ‘ day sailor [sic],” he writes in his website. To drive home the point he tells this anecdote: “On Arion the batteries went dead at times because I never used the engine, always sailed her to and from the mooring.”

That does not mean he did not find plenty to improve. McLaughlin said he disliked the sag in the headstay, so he reinforced the wooden spars with carbon fiber, changed the rig to 7/8, and added running backstays. Increasing the size of the main and doubling the rudder’s depth [not length, Ed.] “made a big difference in handling,” he said.

Inspiring a Wooden Replica

Only a year later, McLaughlin started building the Walter Greene , a wooden replica of Arion for a client who’d fallen in love with the shape and appearance of this boat (see also WoodenBoat No. 200, page 74), thus reversing the common procedure that brings about fiberglass copies of wooden boats (e.g., Dragon, Nordic Folkboat, Herreshoff’s 12½ and Alerion, and many others). Walter Greene very much resembled Arion , but her new wooden hull was somewhat lighter, which prompted McLaughlin to add 1,000 lbs of ballast in the keel, which made her stiffer upwind and helped her win the Opera House Cup.

In 2012, Arion was bought by Steve Frary , a now-retired business executive who had grown up sailing Blue Jays in Barrington, Rhode Island, and later was a deckhand on the Bill of Rights , a replica of the gaff schooner Wanderer . Frary found an online advertisement for the boat and liked the idea of owning a Sidney Herreshoff design, as he had also owned boats by Nathanael Greene Herreshoff and L. Francis Herreshoff.

He also liked the looks of this double-ended ketch and the center cockpit arrangement, which was unusual for Herreshoff. Primarily, Frary bought the boat for practical reasons and the performance potential hinted by her long waterline, narrow beam, and relatively light displacement. “All sailors are racers at some point,” he laughed as he explained that he wanted a “daysailer with weekend capabilities for my young family, a boat that was fun and easy to sail, either single- or doublehanded,” adding, “I did not quite understand what I had until I got deeper into the project.”

Arion refit

A deckbeam is fitted on the aft cabin.

That project was a no-expenses-spared affair at Snediker Yacht Restoration in Pawcatuck, Connecticut, including a new cabintop with two layers of 1⁄4 “ marine ply and 1⁄4 “ Sitka spruce, with V-jointed staving running fore-and-aft, and varnished white oak deckbeams, all covered with one layer of glass cloth and Dynel on the outside and then Awlgripped. “We built it upside down on a female jig off the boat to allow prefinishing and installation of the deckbeams,” explained David Snediker. The interior is all teak, with a cypress ceiling. The yard also installed all new systems and tankage, a new 28-hp Yanmar 3YM30 auxiliary diesel, and built new main and staysail booms. “The original glass is in amazingly good shape. We repaired only about 12 blisters,” Snediker added. “Her hull construction is interesting, [consisting] of pigmented resin and narrow cloth strips. Hull thickness tapers from about 1⁄4 “ at the sheer to 13⁄4 “ at the garboard area, [with] yellow pine deadwood between the bottom of the keel and the ballast. Ballast bolts are Monel.”

Arion’s Restoration for Future Generations

While the restoration added some amenities, it also increased Arion ’s displacement to around 11,800 lbs (5.35 t), according to Frary.  “She [still] covers a lot of ground quickly, doing 8.5 knots, no problem,” he said. He mostly day-sails and races her around Narragansett Bay, with an occasional overnighter. Truth is that her narrow beam of 8 ‘ and her low freeboard, which define her distinctive looks and generate compliments, can also make for a wet ride when the breeze and chop are up.

snediker yacht restoration

Crew at Snediker Yacht Restoration assemble Arion’s new housetop, turned upside down. It comprises marine ply and Sitka spruce staving on white oak deckbeams.

On the other hand, the boat is “300% overbuilt,” as Frary observed, so she can take a licking. Her robust constitution is the reason she survived her first 70 years and is still around to dazzle those who like the classic looks of a Herreshoff design. But back in the day, building this performance-oriented design in a new and unproven material was a huge gamble for Dyer. As history shows, his vision for fiberglass as a boatbuilding material was correct, but no other boats were built from Arion ’s mold, which makes her one of a kind and adds to her appeal.

Boldly predicting that she “could be around for another 100 years,” Frary said he intends to pass her down to his daughter Elizabeth and son Nathaniel. They are already steeped in her lore and the history that informed her design. Halsey Herreshoff, Sidney’s son, was a high school senior when the vessel was launched in 1951. He accompanied his father and Bill Dyer on the shakedown cruise, and several years ago used Sidney’s original drawings to carve a white-oak tiller, which he presented to Frary’s children.

By the look of things, Arion , the boat that started it all, continues to write her own story. (See also, “Still Ticking,” a 2015 Rovings item in PBB No. 157.)

Damian McLaughlin Jr. Corporation, 294 Sam Turner Rd., North Falmouth, MA 02556 USA, tel. 508–563–3075.

Snediker Yacht Restoration, 22 Mechanic Rd., Paw­­catuck, CT 06379 USA, tel. 860–599–0800.

Read more Construction , Design , Refit , Rovings articles

snediker yacht restoration

  • Saildrone Launches 65′ Aluminum USV

Richard Jenkins, an Englishman trained in mechanical engineering, stepped into the limelight on March 26, 2009, in California’s Mojave Desert by setting a 126.1 mph (203 km/h) land sailing speed… Read more »

snediker yacht restoration

  • Gunderson Marine Pays Welding Students

Gunderson Marine of Portland, Oregon, recently side-launched Makani Loa, a 438‘ x 105‘ (133.5m x 32m) container barge for Lynden/Alaska Marine Lines from its 58-acre (32.5-hectare) manufacturing site in the industrial area north… Read more »

snediker yacht restoration

  • Noise Reduction with QuietRide Sound Shield

From Ray Hunt Design comes a timely answer to the growing menace of outboard motor noise.

Subscribe to Professional BoatBuilder magazine

Recent Posts

  • AkzoNobel’s Awlgrip brand launches revolutionary 3D Color Visualizer for boaters and professionals
  • CTM Marine Prepares for Summer 2024
  • Companies (90)
  • Construction (111)
  • Design (166)
  • Drawing Board (11)
  • Education (27)
  • Environment (16)
  • Events (22)
  • Materials (52)
  • Obituary (18)
  • People/Profiles (49)
  • Products (17)
  • Propulsion Systems (34)
  • Racing (17)
  • Repair (37)
  • Rovings (323)
  • Short Cuts (3)
  • Sponsored Partner News (18)
  • Systems (80)
  • Task Sheet (1)
  • Uncategorized (27)
  • Wood to Glass (7)

ProBoat.com Archives

Login on site

Remember Me

Remind the password

Follow the Restoration

Snedikeryacht.

Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC, restoring, maintaining, building wooden boats to the highest level of craftsmanship for over 30 years.

Snediker Yacht Restoration

“Doris, the first yacht of any consequence built under the Universal Rule.”

~ l. francis herreshoff.

Client logo

Long known as VAYU, DORIS has been a part of the New London, CT waterfront since 1955. During those years there have been at least three restoration efforts, and many dreams to save her.  In September of 2015 she was moved to the boat shop of Snediker Yacht Restoration, where her restoration is now underway.

View the work

See the restoration in progress.

DORIS at Low Ebb

DORIS at Low Ebb

Moving Day

Restoration Gallery

Beating the great gloriana.

ON FINE RUN

DORIS Heads Three Sloops Into the Isles of Shoals

Boston Daily Globe; July 10, 1905, pg 10

The best racing of the day was between the three Herreshoff sloops, the DORIS, WASP and GLORIANA. The first named, with 10 feet greater waterline length, found her smaller but leaner rivals hard to shake off. They followed hard in her wake for half the course, the WASP often at her sternboard.

All the way from Thatchers to the finish their skippers were on edge using every means their knowledge suggested to get greater speed out of their boats.  It seemed at times as if one would take the lead clean, but again the boats fell in to a bunch bowling along in close order, with none gaining.

DORIS Holds Spinnaker.

As they neared the finish they, like the schooners, were obliged to drop their spinnakers. The DORIS held on to hers and made good by it.

The breeze was nor freshening a bit, and hauling still more westerly, off the land. This gave a lively swing to the finish of the sloops.

The DORIS led them home, with a cable’s legnth to spare. She carried her spinnaker to the finish, flowed well forward.  The GLORIANA was second over, 75 seconds behind the DORIS. The WASP was a cable’s length behind the Gloriana.  She towed a tender throughout the run, which did not improve her going.  The DORIS probably won, as she allows little, if anything, to the other two.

Image module

Visual galleries illustrating the life of DORIS across the years, featuring photo albums from the private collections of previous owners

Blog posts and articles provide context to DORIS

See the restoration in progress through a series of video segments

Specializing in traditional construction for over thirty years, Snediker Yacht Restoration has built an outstanding reputation for attention to quality and detail. Take a virtual tour of the shop here.

IMAGES

  1. Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC

    snediker yacht restoration

  2. Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC

    snediker yacht restoration

  3. Taylor & Snediker Yacht Restoration: May 2013

    snediker yacht restoration

  4. Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC

    snediker yacht restoration

  5. Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC

    snediker yacht restoration

  6. Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC

    snediker yacht restoration

VIDEO

  1. Owltree

  2. Super Yacht Restoration Project

  3. Vintage Yacht Restoration Vol 3

  4. Cadet 170

  5. DON'T START A BOAT PROJECT

  6. First R143 train on Snediker Curve

COMMENTS

  1. Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC

    After an extensive restoration, Snediker Yacht Restoration has relaunched THE KID. The last remaining American Yacht Club One-Design Class Raceabout was designed by BB Crowninshield and built by Rice Bros Corp in 1902. Originally built for famous yachtsman Oliver Harriman Jr, later in her career she gained a reputation as an award winning Long ...

  2. Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC

    Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC, Pawcatuck, Connecticut. 2,282 likes · 188 talking about this · 21 were here. Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC restoring, maintaining, and building wooden boats to the...

  3. Inside the Shop of Snediker Yacht Restoration

    It's the first week of March 2024 and David Snediker gives a virtual tour of the latest work completed on the historic restoration of HMCo's DORIS Hull 625. ...

  4. Snediker Yacht Restoration

    Snediker Yacht Restoration builds, restores and repairs classic wooden boats. We specialize in traditional construction and have for over thirty years. We have built an outstanding reputation for ...

  5. Tour the Boatshop of Snediker Yacht Restoration in Old Mystic CT

    Snediker Yacht Restoration builds, restores and repairs classic wooden boats. We specialize in traditional construction and have for over thirty years. We ha...

  6. Contact Us

    Custom Boatbuilding and Fine Yacht Restoration / Contact Us. Your name. Your email. Subject. Your message (optional)

  7. DORIS HMCo#625

    Given a one-year lease on life by the generous collaboration of a good friend and Snediker Yacht Restoration of Pawcatuck, a search for a new owner was spearheaded. Now, thanks to an enthusiastic client, DORIS has been saved. The complete restoration of DORIS will be the largest ever undertaken by Snediker Yacht Restoration.

  8. Snediker Yacht Restoration (@snedikeryacht)

    1,782 Followers, 68 Following, 186 Posts - Snediker Yacht Restoration (@snedikeryacht) on Instagram: "Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC, restoring, maintaining, building wooden boats to the highest level of craftsmanship for over 30 years."

  9. Snediker Yacht: Rescuing a Large Lady

    At last she was rescued and brought to Snediker Yacht Restoration, an outfit in Pawcatuck, Connecticut, that's known for meticulous care and skill in building, maintaining, and restoring boats, mostly wooden ones. "Doris is an incredibly lucky girl. Even through neglect, people made sure she didn't get cut up," said Dave Snediker, whose ...

  10. Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC

    Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC is located at 22 Mechanic St in Pawcatuck, Connecticut 06379. Snediker Yacht Restoration, LLC can be contacted via phone at (860) 599-0800 for pricing, hours and directions.

  11. A Herreshoff sloop gets restored

    Jan 15, 2024. Doris, t he 1905 Herreshoff built sloop, is currently undergoing restoration. Snediker Yacht Restoration. D oris was built in 1905 and launched that May by the Herreshoff Manufacturing Co. At 77 feet, 6 inches long, she was the largest all-wooden sailing vessel built by the yard. Doris was also the first yacht built to the then ...

  12. Bringing old boats back from the brink

    Taylor and Snediker Yacht Restoration, wooden-boat builders and masters of repair. For more than a dozen years Bill Taylor, 51, and his partner, Dave Snediker, 42, have brought old wooden boats back to life: Cara Mia, a classic New York 30; Circe, a 53-year-old Sparkman & Stephens cruising sailboat; and The Washingtonian, a 59-foot Trumpy ...

  13. Welcome to Snediker Yacht Restoration

    Snediker Yacht Restoration builds, restores and repairs classic wooden boats. We specialize in traditional construction and have for over thirty years. We have built an outstanding reputation for attention to quality and detail, and have gained a deep understanding of what can go wrong in a wooden boat and how to fix it. Our small ...

  14. A Herreshoff yacht on its way to new life

    Indeed, the restoration of Doris will be more complicated and costly than a replication, Snediker said. In the end, it is sure to be true to the intentions of famed yacht designer Nathanael Greene ...

  15. Welcome to Snediker Yacht Restoration on Vimeo

    Snediker Yacht Restoration builds, restores and repairs classic wooden boats. We specialize in traditional construction and have for over thirty years. We have built…

  16. An Italian on the Bay

    Features. Outside of James Bond movies, David Snediker had never before seen a Venetian water taxi. The boats are practically nonexistent on America's waterways, having been built for Italian canals. Intermezzo was purchased in Venice, Italy, as a functional water taxi by a woman who kept the boat in Sag Harbor, New York, for a few years.

  17. Lecture: "The DORIS Restoration" by Dave Snediker

    Snediker Yacht Restoration builds, restores, and repairs classic wooden boats. They specialize in traditional construction and have been in the business for over thirty years. They have built an outstanding reputation for attention to quality and detail and have gained a deep understanding of what can go wrong in a wooden boat and how to fix it ...

  18. Arion Celebrates Her 70th Anniversary

    Crew at Snediker Yacht Restoration assemble Arion's new housetop, turned upside down. It comprises marine ply and Sitka spruce staving on white oak deckbeams. On the other hand, the boat is "300% overbuilt," as Frary observed, so she can take a licking. Her robust constitution is the reason she survived her first 70 years and is still ...

  19. Snediker Yacht Restoration

    116 likes, 1 comments - snedikeryacht on September 20, 2023: "A view of the bronze hanging knees, and deck beams, in place on DORIS (1905 Herreshoff Cutter). . . . #ngh #herreshoff #classicboats #woodenboat #woodenboats #restorationproject #sailing #sailinglife #boatbuilders #boatshop".

  20. A New Beginning

    Languishing in a boat yard in New London CT for 30 years, DORIS, the largest all-wood sailing vessel built by Herreshoff Manufacturing Co in 1905, was scheduled to be scrapped at the end of August 2013. ... Given a one-year lease on life by the generous collaboration of a good friend and Snediker Yacht Restoration of Pawcatuck, a search for a ...

  21. Yacht, DORIS

    Long known as VAYU, DORIS has been a part of the New London, CT waterfront since 1955. During those years there have been at least three restoration efforts, and many dreams to save her. In September of 2015 she was moved to the boat shop of Snediker Yacht Restoration, where her restoration is now underway.

  22. A Tour of the Snediker Yacht Restoration Boat Shop in Old ...

    Snediker Yacht Restoration builds, restores and repairs classic wooden boats. We specialize in traditional construction and have for over thirty years. We ha...

  23. Snediker Yacht Restoration

    View Snediker Yacht Restoration (www.snedikeryacht.com) location in Connecticut, United States , revenue, industry and description. Find related and similar companies as well as employees by title and much more.