MORGAN HERITAGE TO GIVE LIVE

Published on: Dec 23, 2018


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MORGAN HERITAGE TO GIVE LIVE PERFORMANCE AT BIGGEST NEW YEAR FETE, WASAFI FESTIVAL 2018

Grammy award winning group Morgan Heritage are set to headline the biggest end year party in 254 dubbed Wasafi Festival 2018 at Uhuru Gardens. The Jamaican stars will share the stage alongside celebrated Tanzania’s power house Diamond Platnumz and his WCB crew. They promise to give a thrilling two-hour performance for their Kenyan fans. This will also be the first time Diamond and Morgan Heritage perform their hit song, Hallelujah on Kenyan soil. The two acts met at Fiesta Rwanda in Kigali sometime back and talked their way into a collaboration that took East Africa by storm. Speaking about their upcoming performance by Morgan Heritage, the organisers, The Great Republic said, “We are thrilled to be the first event company in Kenya to do an event of such magnitude.” Adding, “We are bringing the three biggest genres of music among the youth on one platform. Fans of reggae, bongo and Kenyan music will get everything at the Wasafi Festival.” Also, on the night, Pan African TV show, Coke Studio Africa 2019 will also be officially launched on stage. Fans of Coke Studio Africa 2019 will get a glimpse of the music show set to hit the screens in February 2019.

The festival dubbed the biggest end year party in 254 will see Morgan Heritage also share a stage with  Kenya’s Naiboi, Band Beca, Nadia Mukami and  with  WCB crew- Harmonize, Rayvanny, Queen Darlene, Mbosso, Lavalava among others acts. The group was last year nominated for a Grammy for Best Reggae Album – Avrakedabra which has received massive airplay worldwide. Tickets for the festival are available at www.tgrtickets.com for Kshs 2000 Regular, VIP Kshs 5,000, and Kshs VVIP 15,000.

Wasafi festival is sponsored by Coca Cola Company.

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DIANI BEACH FESTIVAL (29TH -31ST DEC 2018)

Published on: Dec 23, 2018


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THE SECOND EDITION OF DIANI BEACH FESTIVAL (29TH -31ST DEC 2018) SET TO LIGHT UP KENYA’S COAST WITH WORLD-CLASS PERFORMANCES.

Diani Beach Festival (DBF) is the hub of day and night activities held in Diani, from 29th of December 2018 till 31st of Dec 2018, suitable for audiences of all ages. For 3 days, the festival’s apt location will bring Luxury Beach Club to Kenya, remaining open every day, offering facilities like bars, restaurants, a Xmas shopping village, lounges, a pool retreat and VIP areas. DBF is set to offer the best experience to guests. In December, the festival kicks off with the skydiving boogie and will be hosting the current skydiving world champions. This attracts tourists from all over the world, a sporting community coming together to do what they love!

The festival partners include Windhoek, Pernod Ricard who will be stocking the DBF bars with everyone’s favourite drinks – Jameson, Absolut and G.H.Mumm Champagne. Fly Tristar are also coming onboard and launching affordable flights from Nairobi directly to Ukunda airstrip, making the 1-hour direct flight from the city to Diani Beach even easier.

Following the success of the first edition of the Diani Beach Festival, East Africa’s premiere music and entertainment festival is back! The 3-day festival will take place at Diani Beach Club – right on the beach and home to Skydive Diani from 29th of Dec till 31st of Dec 2018. DBF will present a series of world-class concert performances including the MTV award winners, Best Group in Africa, Sauti Sol, set to light up the performance stage on the opening night Saturday 29th of Dec, with Kenyan MTV award nominee, Nyashinski ready to deliver an unforgettable showcase to usher in New Year’s Day on 31st Dec alongside the legendary DJ Adrian. DBF will open on 29th of December in style with performances from DJ Kace, DJ Skillz, and DJ JV from Kenya and European queen of Afrobeats DJ Brooke Bailey.

FESTIVAL SCHEDULE

Opening Night – 29th Dec 2018

Sauti Sol, DJ Kace, DJ Skillz, DJ UV & DJ Brooke Bailey (Europe). Hosted by Tracy Wanjiru

Jameson Live – 30th Dec 2018

H_art the Band, Roots Connection & The Beathogs

New Year’s Eve – 31st Dec 2018

Nyashinski, DJ Adrian, DJ Imran Mwangi & DJ Pink Mohawk. Hosted by Sheila Kwamboka

Hosting an array of local artists this time around, the event will also feature a diverse group of top Kenyan acts and bands performing on different nights. Among them, Afro pop band H_art The Band, Kenyan Roots & Culture reggae band – Roots Connection and The Beathogs (30th Dec); House/Electronic DJ Imran Mwangi (Kenya) and DJ Pink Mohawk will also have a special showcase on New Year’s Eve.  The festival will conclude with an incredible fireworks display dubbed as “Magical Kenya”, which will light up the skies at midnight as we usher in 2019.

DBF events & purchase tickets here: https://www.dianibeachfestival.com/

Speaking on the artist selection on this year’s edition, Natasha Reema, one of the event organizers says, “DBF is a platform to promote all the wonderful things about Kenya and one of the key things we want to emphasize is that we have some of the most incredible musical talent in the world and it’s for all our guests both domestic and international to enjoy the experience”.

In conjunction with Kenya Tourism Board, the festival combines sport, music and lifestyle. It will showcase to the world the incredible experiences the beach resort town has to offer. Diani Beach has been rated Africa’s leading beach destination 2018 by World Travel Awards for the 5th time in a row! A picture-perfect beach by the tranquil Indian Ocean, it hosts an array of star rated beach resorts, hotels and restaurants. Diani Reef Hotel CEO, Bobby Kimani says, “Last year, Diani Beach Festival provided an incredible launch pad and we have seen the positive increase in tourism throughout the year. I have no doubt this year the festival will continue to attract more people and we are all looking forward to the growth next year”.

Tom Odero, County Commander, is also working with his team day and night to ensure security is at its best.  He says, “Guests should not have any fears and have the confidence that our team are well trained and equipped to deal with any situation should they arise”.

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HAKUNA MATATA APPARENTLY KUNAYO!

Published on: Dec 17, 2018


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The first thing you do when you get to work is to check your emails. Usually it’s the client stuff, deadlines f*** ups, you know the kawaida. Today I got an email about a petition, honestly I didn’t know that this had actually could happen until a few days ago, the trade marking of a Swahili phrase huh? It kind of reminds you of the audacity of the ‘owning’ of black people for 400 years doesn’t it. How about the resources owned by Western Countries or the African owned companies founded by not-African, you’ll see this a lot when you start applying for funding, or the cultural dilution of the African heritage or the ‘Sound of Music’ that doesn’t have any Africanism in it. It is obvious that we look towards the west for major influences and trends. A perfect example is the Dashiki, it wasn’t that popular until Beyonce wore it.

Trademarking ‘hakuna matata’ a wakeup call?

Disneyland has been granted a US trademark over the words “Hakuna matata” vide registration number 27006605. Hakuna Matata is a Kiswahili slogan meaning no problem, no worries. This slogan is widely used in East Africa, especially the coastal region as a response to greetings.

Disneyland ‘robs’ Kenya of famous ‘Hakuna Matata’ phrase

The famous Kenyan phrase ‘Hakuna Matata’ has now been taken away and going forward one might sued or forced to pay to use it.

We are always a step behind in seeing the value of our own work or resources. Maasai blanket, something that we see hawkers selling on the street every day but all of a sudden we discovered its value when Luis Vitton (2012) used it in his fashion show as part of his collection.

Problem
Disney has trademarked the Swahili phrase “Hakuna Matata”.

I liken this to colonialism and robbery, the appropriation of something you have no right over. Imagine, “If we were to go that route, then we owe the British royalties for everyone who speaks English, or France for when we speak French.”

Join us and say NO to DISNEY or any corporations/individuals looking to trademark languages, terms or phrases they didn’t invent.

“Hakuna matata” is a Swahili language phrase from East Africa; translate, it means “no trouble”. The word “hakuna” means “there is not here” while “matata” means “problems”.

Hakuna Matata has been used by most Kiswahili-speaking countries suchs as Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Mozambique, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Disney can’t be allowed to trademark something that it didn’t invent.

Solution
Sign this petition and get Disney to remove the trademark on Hakuna Matata

https://www.change.org/p/the-walt-disney-company-get-disney-to-reverse-their-trademark-of-hakuna-matata?

Hakuna Matata where were we when the Swahili catch phrase was being trademarked by a country that doesn’t even speak the language. You see that one step behind thing I was talking about. So what do we do now, we sign petitions. Yup! Filling that little box and clicking that share button did amazing for the Rhinos and Elephants. I guess it’s doing something, it’s not that we can actually sue them for trying to own something that is ours… When do we take action to claim what belongs to us, or do we have to wait another 400 years to do that.

Welcome to modern colonialism, where western companies own African resources, where Chinese people have their own police stations and billboards, and where African phrases are trademarked by western companies. So apart from that 10 seconds it takes you fill a petition what are you going to do about it?

Interesting read https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/01/colonialism-in-africa-is-still-alive-and-well

 

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‘UNAPOLEGETICALLY AFRICAN’ by ADELLE ONYANGO

Published on: Dec 14, 2018


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Ladies and Gentlemen, allow me first off say thank you for being here for this. Thank you for giving me an audience to stand before, thank you for the opportunity to be heard, and for giving me a platform to be seen. I appreciate every one of you for supporting this Initiative. That’s right….the Adelle Onyango Initiative. It’s not quite sunk in, to be honest with you all; the fact that I have an initiative, the fact that I am addressing you all, the fact that today is happening. Almost two years I made a conscious effort and decision to try and make a difference in the world and specifically in Kenya and Africa, and today, part of that dream has come true. Making a difference in the world sounds vast and it is, and it is daunting! What I have learnt though in these two years is that each of us has our own little world. We each live in our own little worlds with our families and friends and workmates and the things we love and the things we hate, with our ecosystems and environments, our struggles and disappointments with our insufficiencies and our insecurities together with our hopes and our dreams.  I’ve learnt that making a difference in the world isn’t about one grand gesture. We are not a one size fits all society, each of us has different needs, different wants, different struggles and different challenges.  For me making a difference in the world is more about making a difference for each person, whether it be as simple as showing love, giving a chance or providing opportunity whatever the need may be, it’s about making a difference one world at a time, and eventually added up, we will make a difference in the whole world. And that is my drive. A lot has been said about the Initiative, and I need not add more onto that. Allow me though to share with you my opinion on two things, on women and African-ness.

In 2008 I was raped. Literally, ten years to the day the most brutal, barbaric, inhumane thing that can happen to a human being happened to me. I’m not saying this for you to feel sorry for me. So if you have a lump in your throat clear it, if you have a tear in your eye, wipe it off, and if you’re feeling uncomfortable, deal with it, because this is not only a reality but the norm. Where all of my friends have a story, all of my sisters have the same fears; we get into cabs in three’s and four’s. We live in a society where for a woman, being alone is being vulnerable; you are not secure,  think about that for a second. Being on your own is a risk to your fundamental human rights.

What does it mean to be a woman? What does it mean to be a woman in Africa? What does it mean to be an African woman? And I mean to be a woman, not a wife, not a sister, not a mother, not a girlfriend or a best friend, just to be a woman. Do you picture that lady with shukas around her waist and a baby on her back tied with a leso and pot of water on her head and toddler on her arm? or Do you picture a lady in a power suit in office the head of an organisation, kicking ass and taking names? Who is an African woman? Whatever you picture, recognise that we live in a society governed by gender roles that prescribes who we should be rather than accept who we are.  We need to break down these barriers.

The question is often asked, why are you a feminist? My problem is, why aren’t you a feminist? For the record, feminism and femininity are not mutually exclusive, be what you want to be. I am standing before you today, all dolled up and unapologetic about it, and I am telling you, I want equal rights.  All we want is equal rights, and that’s not just at a legislative level. A father will give his daughter a university student a 7 pm curfew. Because he knows the dark of the night can bring out a darkness in every man that put’s his daughter in danger? But yet, he lets his son wander the night and revel in all it has to offer.  The time has come to sit down with your sons and tell them; you cannot grab girls, you cannot use girls,  girls do not exist for your excitement and pleasure, we are not your playthings. Have honest conversations with your sons, because I guarantee you, your daughters are not the problem!  If my son knows what right, it doesn’t matter if she walks by naked; if my sons know what’s right, he will fight for equal pay, equal rights and equal opportunities, if my son knows what is right, my daughter can be out till 10 pm. If my sons know what’s right, we live in a society as equals. Women are incredible, and nobody ever denies that they are strong, we bear children, raise families, there’s a saying that goes “change a girl’s life, you change a family’s life, you change a community’s life”. And I think if we raise our men right, we will change a girl’s life; if we raise our men right, we will change the world.

And now, Africa!! How many times have you found yourself explaining Africa? Explaining and giving justifications about what it means to be African?”…”I’m from Kenya, a lovely country in East Africa. Over here we have fast Fiber internet just like other countries, Fancy Shopping malls, Smartphones everywhere(trust me Galaxy S7 and iPhone 7 went on sale same day in Nairobi as in NY or Barcelona) Sky scrappers, we know how to code and other geeky stuff too, We watch Aljazeera, CNN, BBC and know what happens in Detroit to what happens in Kosovo…” I read that off a comment on a site.  And I realised the world doesn’t react to Africa the way I think it should, as people, we don’t see things the way they are, we see them the way we are. We have let everyone else tell us who we are, and in doing so we have lost our African narrative in the rest of the worlds’ version of our story. We need to take back our narrative! And it’s not about convincing them; it’s about owning it for us!

I employ you today to be unapologetic about being African. Without giving excuses and explaining where we come from and why we do the things we do. We acknowledge that we are developing but so is everyone else, the only constant in life is, change! Appreciate the social, economic, customs and tradition,that exist in an African context. We cannot be afraid to make mistakes, and we need to be confident in finding our way and our solutions, cognisant of the fact that our solutions are not the rest of the world’s solutions!

We need to change the African narrative, take away the “but” or “despite” in our stories. We are exceptional! We don’t do extraordinary despite challenges; we just are exceptional!! We don’t seek validation, and we are not about comparison; we are not only creating a different set of rules, but we’re also playing a different game, an African game in an African context!! We are not diseased, broken and in need of help, we are gifted, rich, rhythmic, excellent, powerful, creative, modern, traditional, intelligent, we are kings and we are queens, understand that in being African we can change the world, but in trying to be like the world we cannot be African!

So here I stand an unapologetically African girl, who was raped ten years ago, launching an initiative trying to change the world. This is my dream, and it’s only the beginning.

I’d like to thank God, my family for their unconditional support, The Catapult Agency; I’d especially like to thank James for candour and work ethic and Wambaire for, just being everything that I have needed. I want to thank all the people that I have worked within the last two years, I tried to invite everyone, and I hope you all made it, I am grateful for the opportunity to have worked on the different campaigns and projects and concepts. The first sponsors of this initiative; Centonomy, Biwbiw. My partners on this Initiative; Fuzu. My trustees, thank you for believing in this and for taking your time. I want to thank my husband Falgun, for being my partner in life and in all that I do, for your support, your love and just who you are. Thank you.

I would again like to thank every one of you for coming here tonight. And as you leave, I hope you are in one way or another inspired, and if nothing else you will be unapologetically African and you will change someone’s world!

 

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ADELLE ONYANGO ‘UNAPOLEGETICALLY AFRICAN’ LAUNCH

Published on: Dec 14, 2018


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Adelle Onyango launches her initiative at event themed ‘Unapologetically African’

December 13, NAIROBI: Celebrated Media personality Adelle Onyango officially launched her initiative at a star studded event held at the Shift Eye Studios , Nairobi.  The initiative is centered on the foundations of Youth Empowerment, Mental Health and Gender Equality and seeks to give opportunities to the youth and women in this country.

Adelle has gained international recognition for her efforts in empowering Kenyan women and youth, most recently serving on the Youth Advisory Board for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s second annual Goalkeeper’s conference.

The launch dubbed #UnapologeticallyAfrican was a celebration of our “Africanness” through changing the African narrative, taking away the “but” or “despite” in our stories. Being exceptional! Not seeking validation and not comparing ourselves with the rest of the world.

Speaking during the launch, Caroline Mutoko said, “To be an African today means you have probably forgotten your past or are totally ignorant of it and elders explain to you that your future is tied to the past. There’s a choice of rejecting your tradition and flowing with popular culture and still yet be judged by outsiders based on a background you either know nothing about or have left behind. Don’t struggle to let go – don’t struggle to embrace the modern and feel like a sell-out have both because you can.”

Speaking on this milestone, Adelle said, “I implore you today to be unapologetic about being African. Without giving excuses and explaining where we come from and why we do the things we do. We acknowledge that we are developing but so is everyone else, the only constant in life is, change! Appreciate the social, economic, customs and tradition that exist in an African context. We cannot be afraid to make mistakes, and we need to be confident in finding our way and our solutions, cognisant of the fact that our solutions are not the rest of the world’s solutions!”

Adding, “We need to change the African narrative, take away the “but” or “despite” in our stories. We are exceptional! We don’t do extraordinary despite challenges; we just are exceptional!! We don’t seek validation, and we are not about comparison; we are not only creating a different set of rules, but we’re also playing a different game, an African game in an African context!! We are not diseased, broken and in need of help, we are gifted, rich, rhythmic, excellent, powerful, creative, modern, traditional, intelligent, we are kings and we are queens, understand that in being African we can change the world, but in trying to be like the world we cannot be African!”

Speaking on the initiative, Winnie Odinga, one of the Trustees said, “The launch of the Adelle Onyango Initiative is a great achievement for a phenomenal woman like Adelle, as it touches on issues (Mental Health, Youth Empowerment and Gender Equality) that affect our society”.  “It gives me satisfaction as a Kenyan to be part of this noble cause by Kenyans for Kenyans, I hope someone will see this and put a smile on someone’s face today”. She added.

Last year, Adelle was privileged to represent Kenya at the 2017 Children’s Global Media Summit, where she officially received the Duchess of Cambridge and chaired two sessions on youth and cyber-bullying.

In attendance to witness this milestone were Winnie Odinga -Trustee Adelle Onyango Initiative, media personalities –Caroline Mutoko, Shaffie Weru, Victoria Rubadiri, Mwalimu Rachel, Linda Nyangweso, Nelly Tuikong-Park –Pauline Cosmetics, Rama Oluoch, Kirigo Ng’arua, Patricia Kihoro and Patrick Ojil – Africa Business News, friend and family members.

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BORROWED; CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

Published on: Dec 13, 2018


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Creative industries and the informal sector

Creative industries are characterised by the use of creativity and intellectual capital as inputs in the production of goods and services. Increasing attention is being drawn to the sector after the release of multiple detailed reports by UNCTAD emphasising their growing importance for growth and development through the trade potential of creative products. The reference to creative industries usually applies to activities such as design, fashion, film, television, radio, music, the internet, performing arts, visual and graphic arts, digitalised creative content, software and other new media.

With proper investment in creative talents in sub-Saharan Africa, creative ideas can be turned into successful businesses. This is seen, for example, in Nigeria, where the film industry is undergoing important developments and has earned its own brand, labelled “Nollywood”; in Kenya, where digitalisation is expanding; and in different parts of the continent where the fashion and music industries are finally entering the international scene. These industries have a tremendous potential for income generation in Africa given the continent’s abundance of talents, cultural traditions and heritages. Moreover, the lack of a suitable support system to back the development of creative industries has confined these activities to mainly take place in the informal sector, where financial and other constraints limit their production to a small scale. To tap into the income generation potential of these industries in Africa, greater interest should be drawn to the informal sector.

Investing in informal and talented designers would strengthen African fashion both locally and internationally. Most small-scale production is realised in poor neighbourhoods where individual producers would have direct contact with a meagre customer base that helps maintain the business with no growth prospects. Lack of important financial support and business knowledge limits their capacity to move beyond their modest local market. This seems to be a common issue in the informal sector in general.

SOURCE https://africadata.com/blog/2017/09/18/africa-creative-industries/

For the fashion industry, building a network that increases opportunities for exposure, besides providing financial and knowledge support to individual producers, would help to build up local markets in different African countries and boost the global presence of African fashion through trade. Euromonitor (2015) has reported that sub-Saharan Africa’s apparel and footwear market is worth US$31bn, and Africa together with the Middle East are expected to provide fashion’s long-term growth. This is an expanding industry in which efficient use of talents working in the informal sector can result in colossal income generation.

Beyond fashion, African visual arts in general have tremendous income potential. Although fashion is only starting to receive global attention, African artifacts have always held the international eye, even if most are generally perceived as craftworks rather than fine arts. Best known for their representation of African core culture, visual arts in different regions across Africa carry the regional ethnic identity that makes them popular in the tourism industry in Africa. The lack of proper art displays leaves most local artists to organise themselves and try to sell their products in the most touristic sites or in markets in different African cities.

The fact that artifacts trade mainly in informal markets further contributes to keeping most African arts at craftwork level. A solid investment should consist of providing more opportunities to increase local and international exposure of artifacts to change the perceived value of African arts and support skill-building for long-term growth prospects of the industry. There is already growing awareness around supporting professional artists in Africa, as seen with the setting up of the African Arts Trust, which facilitates exhibitions, and funds art organisations and various art projects. We may, however, still be missing investments to tap into the raw talents that are operating in the informal sector.

At this nascent stage of development of creative industries in Africa, the scarcity of intermediaries between the production of creative products and retailing to consumers shortens its value chain and thus keeps African creative products under-valued. The music industry, for example, is on the rise with countries like Democratic Republic of Congo and Nigeria among those leading the way. However, the shortage of recording studios not only encourages talented artists to venture overseas where they reach higher levels of recognition, it also limits the distribution of music products. This constrains the income potentials of this industry, since the distribution to consumers is mostly done through live performances and new media like YouTube, rather than recordings. The industry realises sizeable income losses from a general lack of respect for copyright. Nonetheless, many artists are succeeding in creating music with international appeal and have achieved global recognition. We can see this growing success in a country like Nigeria, which has joined South Africa in increasing its music infrastructure.

Another promising creativity-fuelled industry that is cropping up in Africa is digital technology. With the rise of multimedia and telecommunications technologies comes a global emergence of digital goods that are creatively answering different consumers’ needs. Just like the rest of the world, Africa is not staying behind. Kenya is now leading the world in mobile money with M-Pesa, Nigeria’s e-commerce platform Jumia is booming and attracting international investors like JP Morgan, and the entertainment industry has now very successful online streaming platforms with the biggest being iRoko for African entertainment. At the heart of this digital revolution in Africa are numerous start-ups with innovative and transformative ideas that mostly operate in the informal sector. The ideas stem primarily from the need to answer economic or development needs and they mostly come from an entrepreneurial mind-set that lives the realities of underdevelopment. Those are the entrepreneurs or potential entrepreneurs that mainly operate in the informal sector and need the right investment to turn their ideas into successful businesses.

Besides great income potential, another investment attraction for creative industries is their proven resilience to economic crises, as observed with the last global crisis. Their cultural and geographically-specialised characteristics give them a strong advantage on the global market and make them more resistant to international competition pressures. Cultural goods have the uniqueness of the region that facilitates the build-up of an indelible trademark that further supports the development and growth of the industry. One has to look at what the developed world has made of its movie and music industries, how visual arts (especially fashion) are now driving the society, and how digitalisation is affecting every aspect of our life, to realise the potential of building up African creatives industries. Beyond the income potential, this can also fuel development in the continent and further guarantee a great return to incoming investments.

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